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OT: Kitchen appliance weirdness...

J

John Doe

Guest
An air fryer. Settings.

Fan speed, temperature, and Watts.

What\'s the difference between temperature and Watts?

If it\'s set to 400°, what\'s the difference between 600 W and 1300 W?

I just don\'t get it.

Thanks.
 
S

server

Guest
You are over thinking it. The competition has 2 control knobs.....you have 3
 
R

rangerssuck

Guest
On Wednesday, August 19, 2020 at 2:39:52 PM UTC-4, John Doe wrote:
An air fryer. Settings.

Fan speed, temperature, and Watts.

What\'s the difference between temperature and Watts?

If it\'s set to 400°, what\'s the difference between 600 W and 1300 W?

I just don\'t get it.

Thanks.
one difference would be how fast it reaches the set temperature.
 
R

rangerssuck

Guest
On Wednesday, August 19, 2020 at 8:35:19 PM UTC-4, bule...@columbus.rr.com wrote:
> You are over thinking it. The competition has 2 control knobs.....you have 3

reminiscent of \"the battle of the bulbs\" back in the old days of radio when manufacturers would add tubes with nothing more than their filaments wired so they\'d light up.

We have more tubes. We must be better.
 
L

Lasse Langwadt Christensen

Guest
torsdag den 20. august 2020 kl. 03.01.24 UTC+2 skrev rangerssuck:
On Wednesday, August 19, 2020 at 8:35:19 PM UTC-4, bule...@columbus.rr.com wrote:
You are over thinking it. The competition has 2 control knobs.....you have 3

reminiscent of \"the battle of the bulbs\" back in the old days of radio when manufacturers would add tubes with nothing more than their filaments wired so they\'d light up.

We have more tubes. We must be better.
now you can get \"tube\" amplifiers that just shine an orange led through the base of a random tube prominently displayed on top of the case
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 8/19/2020 5:59 PM, rangerssuck wrote:
On Wednesday, August 19, 2020 at 2:39:52 PM UTC-4, John Doe wrote:
An air fryer. Settings.

Fan speed, temperature, and Watts.

What\'s the difference between temperature and Watts?

If it\'s set to 400°, what\'s the difference between 600 W and 1300 W?

one difference would be how fast it reaches the set temperature.
And maintains.

Control systems are all about dumping energy INTO a process.
Dial back the power to *50W* and see how happy you are with the
results! :>
 
C

Corvid

Guest
On 08/19/2020 11:39 AM, John Doe wrote:
An air fryer. Settings.

Fan speed, temperature, and Watts.

What\'s the difference between temperature and Watts?

If it\'s set to 400�, what\'s the difference between 600 W and 1300 W?

I just don\'t get it.

Thanks.
Set 400* @ 600 W, and the fryer will have a very small volume.
Set 400* @ 1300 W, the fryer becomes much bigger.
 
T

Tabby

Guest
On Wednesday, 19 August 2020 19:39:52 UTC+1, John Doe wrote:
An air fryer. Settings.

Fan speed, temperature, and Watts.

What\'s the difference between temperature and Watts?

If it\'s set to 400°, what\'s the difference between 600 W and 1300 W?

I just don\'t get it.

Thanks.
I presume the difference is the proportion of IR versus heated air


NT
 
J

John Doe

Guest
If you can\'t dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with bullshit.

see also...
=?UTF-8?B?8J+QriBDb3dzIGFyZSBOaWNlIPCfkK4=?= <nice@cows.moo>
Banders <snap@mailchute.com>
Corvid <bl@ckbirds.org>
Cows Are Nice <cows@nice.moo>
Cows are nice <moo@cows.org>
Cows are Nice <nice@cows.moo>
dogs <dogs@home.com>
Great Pumpkin <pumpkin@patch.net>
Jose Curvo <jcurvo@mymail.com>
Local Favorite <how2recycle@palomar.info>
Sea <freshness@coast.org>
Standard Poodle <standard@poodle.com>
and others...

--
Corvid <bl@ckbirds.org> wrote:

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From: Corvid <bl@ckbirds.org
Newsgroups: sci.electronics.design
Subject: Re: OT: Kitchen appliance weirdness
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On 08/19/2020 11:39 AM, John Doe wrote:
An air fryer. Settings.

Fan speed, temperature, and Watts.

What\'s the difference between temperature and Watts?

If it\'s set to 400‹¨«, what\'s the difference between 600 W and 1300 W?

I just don\'t get it.

Thanks.

Set 400* @ 600 W, and the fryer will have a very small volume.
Set 400* @ 1300 W, the fryer becomes much bigger.
 
C

Corvid

Guest
On 08/20/2020 11:25 PM, John Doe wrote:
If you can\'t dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with bullshit.

-- Corvid <bl@ckbirds.org> wrote:
On 08/19/2020 11:39 AM, John Doe wrote:
An air fryer. Settings.

Fan speed, temperature, and Watts.

What\'s the difference between temperature and Watts?
What are those watts heating? A filament? An anvil?

If it\'s set to 400���, what\'s the difference between 600 W and 1300 W?
Idiot. The difference is 700 W.

I just don\'t get it.

Thanks.

Set 400* @ 600 W, and the fryer will have a very small volume.
Set 400* @ 1300 W, the fryer becomes much bigger.
I gave you the best answer you\'re going to get.
 
P

Pimpom

Guest
On 8/20/2020 6:29 AM, rangerssuck wrote:
On Wednesday, August 19, 2020 at 2:39:52 PM UTC-4, John Doe wrote:
An air fryer. Settings.

Fan speed, temperature, and Watts.

What\'s the difference between temperature and Watts?

If it\'s set to 400°, what\'s the difference between 600 W and 1300 W?

I just don\'t get it.

Thanks.

one difference would be how fast it reaches the set temperature.
And the amount of food it can cope with to maintain that temperature.
 
J

John Doe

Guest
Pimpom <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote:

rangerssuck wrote:
John Doe wrote:

An air fryer. Settings.

Fan speed, temperature, and Watts.

What\'s the difference between temperature and Watts?

If it\'s set to 400°, what\'s the difference between 600 W and
1300 W?

I just don\'t get it.

one difference would be how fast it reaches the set temperature.

And the amount of food it can cope with to maintain that
temperature.
Only if you assume the fan speed varies AND the cooking temperature
is monitored. Not the case here.

The air fryer operation has nothing to do with volume of food.

This is the popular \"AS SEEN ON TV\" unit I\'m talking about...

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075X3287P/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s02?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I should ask the same in the question section, to get some very
silly answers.
 
J

John Doe

Guest
Even if it did sense cooking temperature (somehow, no telling how) and
adjust accordingly, what would be the point of a wattage control? You
set the temperature and it heats the food at that temperature.

It makes no sense.

A fan speed control would make sense, while regulating the heating
element temperature. But apparently that\'s not what it is. If it were,
surely they would say so.
 
J

John Doe

Guest
They tout the wattage control as a safety feature, to match your house
current sourcing capability. As if ordinary people have a clue. Their
circuit breaker keeps tripping? The house catches on fire?

In any case, lower wattage means lower temperature. They should specify
wattage as a requirement, instead.
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 8/21/2020 10:05 PM, John Doe wrote:
Pimpom <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote:

rangerssuck wrote:
John Doe wrote:

An air fryer. Settings.

Fan speed, temperature, and Watts.

What\'s the difference between temperature and Watts?

If it\'s set to 400°, what\'s the difference between 600 W and
1300 W?

I just don\'t get it.

one difference would be how fast it reaches the set temperature.

And the amount of food it can cope with to maintain that
temperature.

Only if you assume the fan speed varies AND the cooking temperature
is monitored. Not the case here.
The temperature of the AIR is likely monitored and used to control
the heating element.

Set the temperature to its minimum. Observe element (or, observe
power drawn from mains). It will likely cycle at a slow rate or
duty cycle (depending on control algorithm).

Set temperature to its maximum. Element will likely stay on for
longer periods of time; power consumption will be higher as it
tries to maintain that higher temperature in the face of inevitable
losses.

[There may even be an indication as to whether it has reached the
DESIRED temperature, yet -- as is common with most ovens]

In either case, you\'re dumping energy into the process (the
process being \"heating the interior space to the specified
temperature despite the presence of a thermal mass). More watts
translates to more energy (work) per unit time.

> The air fryer operation has nothing to do with volume of food.

The fryer is doing *work*. Watts define the RATE at which work is being done.

Put a frozen turkey on the counter. Time how long it takes to defrost.

Put same turkey in an oven \"on LOW\". Note difference in time. Oven is
doing work at a rate defined by the number of \"watts\" in the heating
element (assuming it is on continuously... adjust, otherwise).

Repeat \"on HIGH\".

The reason you want to adjust the power level (Watts) is because some
foods may not respond well to higher \"work rates\". E.g., trying to defrost
that turkey \"on HIGH\" will likely lead to a charred exterior before the
interior has completely thawed. I.e., you\'d want to use the \"LOW\"
setting, there.

As I said upthread, imagine what would likely happen if you tried to
fry 3 pounds of potatoes with a \"50W\" setting! Likely \"warm\" potatoes
with no \"crunch\"!

(put a 60W light bulk next to a diced potato and let us know how that
turns out for you!)

This is the popular \"AS SEEN ON TV\" unit I\'m talking about...

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075X3287P/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s02?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I should ask the same in the question section, to get some very
silly answers.
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 8/21/2020 10:30 PM, John Doe wrote:
In any case, lower wattage means lower temperature. They should specify
wattage as a requirement, instead.
No. Lower watts means lower rate of CHANGING temperature for a given thermal
mass.

Leave the device empty. Set temperature to maximum and wattage to minimum.
I suspect you will discover that it can attain that maximum temperature
in some amount of time.

Now, put a chunk of lead in it and set temperature to minimum and wattage to
maximum. Why is it taking so long to \"cook\" that chunk of lead?? You\'ve
set the desired temperature LOWER and the \"rate of work\" higher... yet it\'s
still COLD (room temperature) when you take it out 5 minutes later!
 
P

Phil Allison

Guest
John Dope Head wrote:

=======================

They tout the wattage control as a safety feature, to match your house
current sourcing capability.
** Exactly what it is.


> As if ordinary people have a clue.

** As if you have one either.


> Their circuit breaker keeps tripping?

** That would be a warning you are using too much power.


> The house catches on fire?

** Is your fat arse on fire?


In any case, lower wattage means lower temperature.
** ROTFL !! No it don\'t.


They should specify wattage as a requirement,
** Shame not one poster here agrees.

Why don\'t you just fuck off and stop making an utter ass of yourself ??



..... Phil
 
J

John Doe

Guest
Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

John Doe wrote:

In any case, lower wattage means lower temperature. They should
specify wattage as a requirement, instead.

No. Lower watts means lower rate of CHANGING temperature for a
given thermal mass.
No. You are suggesting they have some sort of sophisticated
temperature measuring device. They don\'t.

You think they actually monitor the temperature of your food, as if
you stuck a temperature probe into it? That\'s silly. Not for cheap.
 
J

John Doe

Guest
Regular troll...

--
Phil Allison <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

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John Dope Head wrote:

=======================

They tout the wattage control as a safety feature, to match your house
current sourcing capability.

** Exactly what it is.


As if ordinary people have a clue.

** As if you have one either.


Their circuit breaker keeps tripping?

** That would be a warning you are using too much power.


The house catches on fire?

** Is your fat arse on fire?


In any case, lower wattage means lower temperature.


** ROTFL !! No it don\'t.


They should specify wattage as a requirement,


** Shame not one poster here agrees.

Why don\'t you just fuck off and stop making an utter ass of yourself ??



.... Phil
 
J

John Doe

Guest
Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

John Doe wrote:
Pimpom <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote:
rangerssuck wrote:
John Doe wrote:

An air fryer. Settings.

Fan speed, temperature, and Watts.

What\'s the difference between temperature and Watts?

If it\'s set to 400°, what\'s the difference between 600 W
and 1300 W?

I just don\'t get it.

one difference would be how fast it reaches the set
temperature.

And the amount of food it can cope with to maintain that
temperature.

Only if you assume the fan speed varies AND the cooking
temperature is monitored. Not the case here.

The temperature of the AIR is likely monitored and used to control
the heating element.
You think? I don\'t think so. More likely, as you should know, it\'s
just a preset current through the heating element that is hopefully
resulting in a temperature corresponding to the oven setting.

Set the temperature to its minimum. Observe element (or, observe
power drawn from mains). It will likely cycle at a slow rate or
duty cycle (depending on control algorithm).
Very likely I will in fact do that. But my wattage meter is
temporarily monitoring a new portable freezer. It will be free for
use on the air fryer within a few weeks.

The air fryer operation has nothing to do with volume of food.

The fryer is doing *work*. Watts define the RATE at which work is
being done.
Just like the heating element temperature, that\'s also a setting on
the air fryer.

But if you limit the Watts, your oven temperature setting won\'t
function properly. That might be good for people who have
substandard electrical wiring and maybe think they will soon move
into a better place or get their wiring fixed.
 
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