OT: alcohol based perfume removal?...

T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 10:15, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
I did suggest
calling the manufacturer to get more info.

I doubt if you will get anything other than a bland statement that their
products are fine or only contain \'natural\' ingredients (such as
D-Limonene, oxalic acid, tannin and aconitine?).

I have tried calling the manufacturers. They won\'t
answer you as they think your are about to sue them
and they really just don\'t care. Tide for example.
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 13:06, Cydrome Leader wrote:
T <T@invalid.invalid> wrote:
Hi All,

Anyone with a chemistry background?

There are now laundry perfumes and fabric finishes
(that are highly scented) that are not meant to
wash out. They toxic substances are very difficult
on folks with allergies, especially asthma. They
don\'t wash out.

Somewhere that I do not remember, I read that these
toxic substances are alcohol soluble and won\'t wash
out in water. Am I correct?

Anyway, if alcohol soluble, how do you get them out?
Dump a bottle of rubbing alcohol in the washer?

Any other ideas one way other the other?

Many thanks,
-T

Not sure what you\'re after here, but if you want a laundry detergent
itself with no extra smells of any type added, look at the lineup from
Atsko. The no UV hunting detergent and sport wash are the same product
with different labelling. Nothing else comes close to just being detergent
with no additives. The stuff has virtually no odor even if you smell from
the jug itself. It also leaves no weird residues on washed clothing. It\'s
perfect for hypochondriacs or people who just need rags with no residue on
them.

I am after getting other people chemicals out of
my cloths. I have tried stuff for hunters and
it does not work.
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 13:06, Cydrome Leader wrote:
T <T@invalid.invalid> wrote:
Hi All,

Anyone with a chemistry background?

There are now laundry perfumes and fabric finishes
(that are highly scented) that are not meant to
wash out. They toxic substances are very difficult
on folks with allergies, especially asthma. They
don\'t wash out.

Somewhere that I do not remember, I read that these
toxic substances are alcohol soluble and won\'t wash
out in water. Am I correct?

Anyway, if alcohol soluble, how do you get them out?
Dump a bottle of rubbing alcohol in the washer?

Any other ideas one way other the other?

Many thanks,
-T

Not sure what you\'re after here, but if you want a laundry detergent
itself with no extra smells of any type added, look at the lineup from
Atsko. The no UV hunting detergent and sport wash are the same product
with different labelling. Nothing else comes close to just being detergent
with no additives. The stuff has virtually no odor even if you smell from
the jug itself. It also leaves no weird residues on washed clothing. It\'s
perfect for hypochondriacs or people who just need rags with no residue on
them.

I am after getting other people chemicals out of
my cloths. I have tried stuff for hunters and
it does not work.
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 13:56, Clifford Heath wrote:
> vinegar in the rinse

That use to work, until they came up with these
new persistent chemicals
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 13:56, Clifford Heath wrote:
> vinegar in the rinse

That use to work, until they came up with these
new persistent chemicals
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 13:56, Clifford Heath wrote:
> vinegar in the rinse

That use to work, until they came up with these
new persistent chemicals
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 13:56, Clifford Heath wrote:
> vinegar in the rinse

That use to work, until they came up with these
new persistent chemicals
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 02:03, Carlos E. R. wrote:
The obvious solution is simply to not add a softener to the machine -
our machines have 4 receptacles: pre-wash, wash, bleach, and softener.

Hi Carlos,

Oh lord! What makes you think I would use these chemicals?
My house is totally unscented.

I am picking them up from other people\'s houses and businesses.

-T
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 02:03, Carlos E. R. wrote:
The obvious solution is simply to not add a softener to the machine -
our machines have 4 receptacles: pre-wash, wash, bleach, and softener.

Hi Carlos,

Oh lord! What makes you think I would use these chemicals?
My house is totally unscented.

I am picking them up from other people\'s houses and businesses.

-T
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 04:02, Rick C wrote:
> To people who aren\'t sensitive, all these scents smell good.

Forbes did an article about 40 years ago about that.
The new fragrances are meant to be remembered. The
easiest way is for them to be \"offensive\".

I remember walking down a business hallway and remarking
\"Did someone spray for ants?\" and a secretary proudly
announced \"It is my new perfume! It is called \'Poison\'!\"
And yes, I remembered it.

Some still smell good. Most now smell like roach spray
or the sweat off a pig. We call it \"dress for success
perfume\" because women dressed in business suites
are the worst offenders.

> To the rest of us it\'s not a lot different from spreading the smell of feces or decaying flesh. Some scents are barely noticeable and not offensive to me, like in the antiperspirants I use.

To those that are sensitive, your deodorant does
bother them, especially Brute. Your hand lotion,
hand soap, shampoo, shaving lotion, hand sanitize
too.

Keep in mine that your nose can only smell
differences, so you quickly get immune to the smell
and can\'t tell it is there. To add insult to injury,
some folks keep adding perfume some they can
smell it again, not to mention \"layering\" perfumes.

Consider using White Vinegar as your deodorant. No
toxic chemicals in it and it works really well.


>I wonder why they use the scents that are much stronger and easily offend. I guess it\'s still a tiny minority who are sensitive and what sells, sells.

A \"minority for sure, but not a \"tiny minority\".
And corporations could come up with stinks that are
non-toxic if they wanted to. But those cost
more money.

I hate to say it, but when dealing with large corporations,
they are neither moral nor immoral. They are \"amoral\".
All that matters is the number at the bottom line of
their spreadsheet. It is the job of lawyers to tilt
that number towards them using nontoxic scents.

Or our neighbors could give a damn about the affect
on those around them and stop purchasing those products.
That would tilt the number on the bottom line in
a hell of a hurry.

Unfortunately, most do not give a damn if their neighbor
has to leave the grocery store gasping in terror trying
to breath and could not purchase food.
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 04:02, Rick C wrote:
> To people who aren\'t sensitive, all these scents smell good.

Forbes did an article about 40 years ago about that.
The new fragrances are meant to be remembered. The
easiest way is for them to be \"offensive\".

I remember walking down a business hallway and remarking
\"Did someone spray for ants?\" and a secretary proudly
announced \"It is my new perfume! It is called \'Poison\'!\"
And yes, I remembered it.

Some still smell good. Most now smell like roach spray
or the sweat off a pig. We call it \"dress for success
perfume\" because women dressed in business suites
are the worst offenders.

> To the rest of us it\'s not a lot different from spreading the smell of feces or decaying flesh. Some scents are barely noticeable and not offensive to me, like in the antiperspirants I use.

To those that are sensitive, your deodorant does
bother them, especially Brute. Your hand lotion,
hand soap, shampoo, shaving lotion, hand sanitize
too.

Keep in mine that your nose can only smell
differences, so you quickly get immune to the smell
and can\'t tell it is there. To add insult to injury,
some folks keep adding perfume some they can
smell it again, not to mention \"layering\" perfumes.

Consider using White Vinegar as your deodorant. No
toxic chemicals in it and it works really well.


>I wonder why they use the scents that are much stronger and easily offend. I guess it\'s still a tiny minority who are sensitive and what sells, sells.

A \"minority for sure, but not a \"tiny minority\".
And corporations could come up with stinks that are
non-toxic if they wanted to. But those cost
more money.

I hate to say it, but when dealing with large corporations,
they are neither moral nor immoral. They are \"amoral\".
All that matters is the number at the bottom line of
their spreadsheet. It is the job of lawyers to tilt
that number towards them using nontoxic scents.

Or our neighbors could give a damn about the affect
on those around them and stop purchasing those products.
That would tilt the number on the bottom line in
a hell of a hurry.

Unfortunately, most do not give a damn if their neighbor
has to leave the grocery store gasping in terror trying
to breath and could not purchase food.
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 09:12, Martin Brown wrote:
> You might get better answers in sci.chem than here

I just posted over there.

I originally searched for it in subscriptions, but I
typed out \"chemistry\" and could not find it. Thank
you!
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 09:12, Martin Brown wrote:
> You might get better answers in sci.chem than here

I just posted over there.

I originally searched for it in subscriptions, but I
typed out \"chemistry\" and could not find it. Thank
you!
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 09:12, Martin Brown wrote:
> You might get better answers in sci.chem than here

I just posted over there.

I originally searched for it in subscriptions, but I
typed out \"chemistry\" and could not find it. Thank
you!
 
L

Liz Tuddenham

Guest
Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote:

On Friday, November 19, 2021 at 3:26:22 PM UTC-4, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:

torsdag den 18. november 2021 kl. 22.18.51 UTC+1 skrev
gnuarm.del...@gmail.com:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 3:48:12 PM UTC-4, Carlos E.R. wrote:
On 18/11/2021 20.22, Rick C wrote:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 3:09:58 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 11/18/21 11:01, Rick C wrote:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 1:37:22 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 11/18/21 06:38, Rick C wrote:

Having asthma does not equate to being sensitive to perfumes.
There may be a correlation, but how strong?

I sincerely hope you or anyone you love ever get
sensitive. Your outlook will change dramatically.

My having the condition does not change the facts which you seem
to be exaggerating.

That is a good excuse for not giving a shit about
what harm your behavior causes your neighbors.

This is the sort of exaggeration I\'m referring to.


And I am not exaggerating. You need to watch helplessly
as someone you love gasps in terror trying to breath.
Or maybe have it happen to you.

You still can\'t respond to the actual statement I made.


Whatsoever you would have others do unto you, do
unto them. Have you ever heard of \"karma\"?

Here you have gone off the deep end casting me as someone who
creates problems for you. You\'ve lost it now.

The condition is very real. People like you who can\'t be rational
about it and only talk in terms of emotion should stay away from the
forefront or others will think we are all like you. Yes, it is real,
but it is psychosomatic. Doesn\'t make it less real.
It is not psychosomatic (caused or aggravated by a mental factor such as
internal conflict or stress). Anything you say about psychosomatic
illnesses is not relevant.

how can you rules out it is psychosomatic? the mind can do weird things,
and smells are already know to be powerful triggers of for example
memories
I can\'t speak for everyone, but in my case some of the chemicals in
perfumes act as neurotoxins, causing confusion, nausea and making my
eyes unable to focus. This has happened on occasions when I was unaware
of any smell but later discovered that an odourless \'air freshener\' had
been installed without my knowledge.

Where there is a psychological element, it is when I avoid perfumes I
can smell in case they contain substances that are toxic to me. I would
rather do that than wait to see if they make me ill. It\'s called
\'learning\'.

I had no idea you were affected so profoundly. Is there anything about
this in the MSDS for the substances you are talking about?

I haven\'t been able to identify the substances because the manufacturers
aren\'t under any obligation to disclose them (\'perfume\' is unique in
this respect). I believe some research bodies have conducted
independent tests and found banned carcinogens and other known toxins,
but I don\'t have copies of these results.

[I shan\'t be able to respond to your replies for a couple of days
because I shall be out of internet contact]

--
~ Liz Tuddenham ~
(Remove the \".invalid\"s and add \".co.uk\" to reply)
www.poppyrecords.co.uk
 
L

Liz Tuddenham

Guest
Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote:

On Friday, November 19, 2021 at 3:26:22 PM UTC-4, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:

torsdag den 18. november 2021 kl. 22.18.51 UTC+1 skrev
gnuarm.del...@gmail.com:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 3:48:12 PM UTC-4, Carlos E.R. wrote:
On 18/11/2021 20.22, Rick C wrote:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 3:09:58 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 11/18/21 11:01, Rick C wrote:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 1:37:22 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 11/18/21 06:38, Rick C wrote:

Having asthma does not equate to being sensitive to perfumes.
There may be a correlation, but how strong?

I sincerely hope you or anyone you love ever get
sensitive. Your outlook will change dramatically.

My having the condition does not change the facts which you seem
to be exaggerating.

That is a good excuse for not giving a shit about
what harm your behavior causes your neighbors.

This is the sort of exaggeration I\'m referring to.


And I am not exaggerating. You need to watch helplessly
as someone you love gasps in terror trying to breath.
Or maybe have it happen to you.

You still can\'t respond to the actual statement I made.


Whatsoever you would have others do unto you, do
unto them. Have you ever heard of \"karma\"?

Here you have gone off the deep end casting me as someone who
creates problems for you. You\'ve lost it now.

The condition is very real. People like you who can\'t be rational
about it and only talk in terms of emotion should stay away from the
forefront or others will think we are all like you. Yes, it is real,
but it is psychosomatic. Doesn\'t make it less real.
It is not psychosomatic (caused or aggravated by a mental factor such as
internal conflict or stress). Anything you say about psychosomatic
illnesses is not relevant.

how can you rules out it is psychosomatic? the mind can do weird things,
and smells are already know to be powerful triggers of for example
memories
I can\'t speak for everyone, but in my case some of the chemicals in
perfumes act as neurotoxins, causing confusion, nausea and making my
eyes unable to focus. This has happened on occasions when I was unaware
of any smell but later discovered that an odourless \'air freshener\' had
been installed without my knowledge.

Where there is a psychological element, it is when I avoid perfumes I
can smell in case they contain substances that are toxic to me. I would
rather do that than wait to see if they make me ill. It\'s called
\'learning\'.

I had no idea you were affected so profoundly. Is there anything about
this in the MSDS for the substances you are talking about?

I haven\'t been able to identify the substances because the manufacturers
aren\'t under any obligation to disclose them (\'perfume\' is unique in
this respect). I believe some research bodies have conducted
independent tests and found banned carcinogens and other known toxins,
but I don\'t have copies of these results.

[I shan\'t be able to respond to your replies for a couple of days
because I shall be out of internet contact]

--
~ Liz Tuddenham ~
(Remove the \".invalid\"s and add \".co.uk\" to reply)
www.poppyrecords.co.uk
 
L

Liz Tuddenham

Guest
Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote:

On Friday, November 19, 2021 at 3:26:22 PM UTC-4, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:

torsdag den 18. november 2021 kl. 22.18.51 UTC+1 skrev
gnuarm.del...@gmail.com:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 3:48:12 PM UTC-4, Carlos E.R. wrote:
On 18/11/2021 20.22, Rick C wrote:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 3:09:58 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 11/18/21 11:01, Rick C wrote:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 1:37:22 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 11/18/21 06:38, Rick C wrote:

Having asthma does not equate to being sensitive to perfumes.
There may be a correlation, but how strong?

I sincerely hope you or anyone you love ever get
sensitive. Your outlook will change dramatically.

My having the condition does not change the facts which you seem
to be exaggerating.

That is a good excuse for not giving a shit about
what harm your behavior causes your neighbors.

This is the sort of exaggeration I\'m referring to.


And I am not exaggerating. You need to watch helplessly
as someone you love gasps in terror trying to breath.
Or maybe have it happen to you.

You still can\'t respond to the actual statement I made.


Whatsoever you would have others do unto you, do
unto them. Have you ever heard of \"karma\"?

Here you have gone off the deep end casting me as someone who
creates problems for you. You\'ve lost it now.

The condition is very real. People like you who can\'t be rational
about it and only talk in terms of emotion should stay away from the
forefront or others will think we are all like you. Yes, it is real,
but it is psychosomatic. Doesn\'t make it less real.
It is not psychosomatic (caused or aggravated by a mental factor such as
internal conflict or stress). Anything you say about psychosomatic
illnesses is not relevant.

how can you rules out it is psychosomatic? the mind can do weird things,
and smells are already know to be powerful triggers of for example
memories
I can\'t speak for everyone, but in my case some of the chemicals in
perfumes act as neurotoxins, causing confusion, nausea and making my
eyes unable to focus. This has happened on occasions when I was unaware
of any smell but later discovered that an odourless \'air freshener\' had
been installed without my knowledge.

Where there is a psychological element, it is when I avoid perfumes I
can smell in case they contain substances that are toxic to me. I would
rather do that than wait to see if they make me ill. It\'s called
\'learning\'.

I had no idea you were affected so profoundly. Is there anything about
this in the MSDS for the substances you are talking about?

I haven\'t been able to identify the substances because the manufacturers
aren\'t under any obligation to disclose them (\'perfume\' is unique in
this respect). I believe some research bodies have conducted
independent tests and found banned carcinogens and other known toxins,
but I don\'t have copies of these results.

[I shan\'t be able to respond to your replies for a couple of days
because I shall be out of internet contact]

--
~ Liz Tuddenham ~
(Remove the \".invalid\"s and add \".co.uk\" to reply)
www.poppyrecords.co.uk
 
L

Liz Tuddenham

Guest
Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote:

On Friday, November 19, 2021 at 3:26:22 PM UTC-4, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:

torsdag den 18. november 2021 kl. 22.18.51 UTC+1 skrev
gnuarm.del...@gmail.com:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 3:48:12 PM UTC-4, Carlos E.R. wrote:
On 18/11/2021 20.22, Rick C wrote:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 3:09:58 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 11/18/21 11:01, Rick C wrote:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 1:37:22 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 11/18/21 06:38, Rick C wrote:

Having asthma does not equate to being sensitive to perfumes.
There may be a correlation, but how strong?

I sincerely hope you or anyone you love ever get
sensitive. Your outlook will change dramatically.

My having the condition does not change the facts which you seem
to be exaggerating.

That is a good excuse for not giving a shit about
what harm your behavior causes your neighbors.

This is the sort of exaggeration I\'m referring to.


And I am not exaggerating. You need to watch helplessly
as someone you love gasps in terror trying to breath.
Or maybe have it happen to you.

You still can\'t respond to the actual statement I made.


Whatsoever you would have others do unto you, do
unto them. Have you ever heard of \"karma\"?

Here you have gone off the deep end casting me as someone who
creates problems for you. You\'ve lost it now.

The condition is very real. People like you who can\'t be rational
about it and only talk in terms of emotion should stay away from the
forefront or others will think we are all like you. Yes, it is real,
but it is psychosomatic. Doesn\'t make it less real.
It is not psychosomatic (caused or aggravated by a mental factor such as
internal conflict or stress). Anything you say about psychosomatic
illnesses is not relevant.

how can you rules out it is psychosomatic? the mind can do weird things,
and smells are already know to be powerful triggers of for example
memories
I can\'t speak for everyone, but in my case some of the chemicals in
perfumes act as neurotoxins, causing confusion, nausea and making my
eyes unable to focus. This has happened on occasions when I was unaware
of any smell but later discovered that an odourless \'air freshener\' had
been installed without my knowledge.

Where there is a psychological element, it is when I avoid perfumes I
can smell in case they contain substances that are toxic to me. I would
rather do that than wait to see if they make me ill. It\'s called
\'learning\'.

I had no idea you were affected so profoundly. Is there anything about
this in the MSDS for the substances you are talking about?

I haven\'t been able to identify the substances because the manufacturers
aren\'t under any obligation to disclose them (\'perfume\' is unique in
this respect). I believe some research bodies have conducted
independent tests and found banned carcinogens and other known toxins,
but I don\'t have copies of these results.

[I shan\'t be able to respond to your replies for a couple of days
because I shall be out of internet contact]

--
~ Liz Tuddenham ~
(Remove the \".invalid\"s and add \".co.uk\" to reply)
www.poppyrecords.co.uk
 
M

Martin Brown

Guest
On 19/11/2021 19:26, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

torsdag den 18. november 2021 kl. 22.18.51 UTC+1 skrev
gnuarm.del...@gmail.com:
On Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 3:48:12 PM UTC-4, Carlos E.R. wrote:
On 18/11/2021 20.22, Rick C wrote:

The condition is very real. People like you who can\'t be rational
about it and only talk in terms of emotion should stay away from the
forefront or others will think we are all like you. Yes, it is real,
but it is psychosomatic. Doesn\'t make it less real.

It is not psychosomatic (caused or aggravated by a mental factor such as
internal conflict or stress). Anything you say about psychosomatic
illnesses is not relevant.

how can you rules out it is psychosomatic? the mind can do weird things,
and smells are already know to be powerful triggers of for example
memories

Smells and taste are primitive senses and go very deep into the lowest
levels of awareness. There are reflex actions like sneezes that trigger
well before the brain has time to classify what the smell is or even
recognise that it is present. Bitterness and some revolting smells are
there as a warning. Covid has been shown to scramble sense of smell.

Not good if you make your living as a food taster or whiskey blender.

I can\'t speak for everyone, but in my case some of the chemicals in
perfumes act as neurotoxins, causing confusion, nausea and making my
eyes unable to focus. This has happened on occasions when I was unaware
of any smell but later discovered that an odourless \'air freshener\' had
been installed without my knowledge.

I think you are making up word salad here. I am very sensitive to smells
at a level where I can identify many organic chemicals by smell alone. I
can also match worn clothes to their owners quite reliably.

I was allergic to tobacco smoke and perfume counters as a child but I
grew out of it. The only remaining thing is that on exposure to an
unexpected strong (to me) smell I can sneeze violently a full 2s before
I can smell it. Sometimes I cannot quite smell it but know it is there.

Most times people with me cannot smell it at all and the odd one can
identify something that makes their nose tingle but no smell as such.
Bad ones sometimes bring tears to my eyes but I can live with that.

The weirdest thing is that my mum had no sense of smell or taste (nor
did my great aunt) and one of my female cousins is also a super taster.
The genetic difference between being a super taster and can\'t smell at
all must be almost a hard on/off genetic switch somewhere.

Where there is a psychological element, it is when I avoid perfumes I
can smell in case they contain substances that are toxic to me. I would
rather do that than wait to see if they make me ill. It\'s called
\'learning\'.

They are not truly toxic to you unless you go into anaphylactic shock. I
do have such a vulnerability but not to any smell. I wear a medic alert
bracelet and have an ICE warning on my mobile phone lock screen.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
 
M

Martin Brown

Guest
On 18/11/2021 23:24, Dave Platt wrote:
In article <f3394a4a-a349-4f6b-bcd0-d4d479b6df0an@googlegroups.com>,
Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote:

I\'m surprised that natural scents are an issue.

\"Natural\" doesn\'t necessarily equate to \"benign\". A lot of plants
seem to have evolved the ability to generate volatiles which are quite
effective insecticides. Orange and lemon oils are very effective ant
repellants and killers, and mint oil is apparently neurotoxic to many
insects (it\'s the key active ingredient, along with soap, in some
\"green\" wasp killing sprays).

Most natural flavours and smells are intended by the plant as either a
fungicide, pesticide or sunscreen. The fact that some of the stimulant
neurotoxins that plants use to kill insects have a very different effect
on us in trace doses makes them interesting to human cultivation.

Of the things in the Alnwick poison garden the henbane was the only
thing I found unbearable to remain near. I found its smell overpowering.
Daturas by comparison only smell bad if you bruise the plant - the
flowers smell absolutely divine (once used as a soap fragrance).
Here\'s an interesting research article (from 2018) citing evidence that
natural emissions of volatile oils from plants can be a significant
contributor to asthma problems:

https://www.dovepress.com/getfile.php?fileID=50644

It discusses the fact that many of these terpenes, aldehydes, and
ketones are sensitizers, and that their sensitizing ability tends to
increase as the compounds oxidize.

I\'m sure that is true. Especially in places where there are lots of
trees growing that exude hydrocarbons. The blue haze around certain
Australian forest trees like eucalyptus is an example

http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/motm/isoprene/isoprenec.htm

If you are sensitive to orange oil, can you not handle an orange or eat
orange?

I can handle them OK, as long as the skin isn\'t abraded - the volatile
oil is contained mostly in oil glands in the skin. My main
sensitivity seems to be by inhalation - I can\'t recall ever having a
problem with skin dermatitis from the oil.

When my wife eats an orange I ask her to peel it outside and throw
away the peel.

I can get away with eating a small amount of citrus, or drinking a
small amount of orange juice, occasionally... my sensitivity to it
seems to worsen after repeated exposure and retreat with time.

How about grapefruit? That is a known problem for anyone on statins
since it contains enough of a compound furanocoumarins that radically
alters drug uptake rates to cause potentially serious problems.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/nov/26/grapefruit-health-risk-warning

Different species of citrus affect me differently. The common oranges
(e.g. naval) seem to be the worst. Lemons are intermediate, and I
have good tolerance for lime and for blood oranges. I presume this
is due to differences in the volatile oil chemistry of the different
species..

It might be worth looking to see which compounds are present in the ones
that you find acceptable. Limes are considerably less aromatic than most
lemons. There are many hybrid citrus fruit to try in all shapes and
sizes so that you may be able to find some that you can eat OK.
It\'s a shame - I love the flavor of citrus and I would eat it more
often than I do, if I could get away with it.

Stay away from the bruised skin of citrus fruit. That is where you are
most likely to have a problem.

I stopped wearing cologne and now wear essential oils because they don\'t cause me any trouble. They don\'t last as
long, but I haven\'t found anyone they offend. Now that you mention it, I will look for orange oil next time I\'m in the
store. I would like wearing that and I don\'t think it will be strong enough to bother anyone here through the Internet.

No, fortunately, the amount of volatile-oil transfer down the wires
(capillary action) or through fiber-optic or microwave links is quite
negligible :)

Increasingly limonene is being used as an eco friendly cleaning solvent.
This may pose a problem for people who are sensitive to it (or rather to
the oxidised impurities present in it).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limonene

Citral is much more likely to be a source of \"perfume\" allergy though:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citral

(around 1-2% of people are allergic to citral to some extent)

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
 

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