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OT: alcohol based perfume removal?...

L

Liz Tuddenham

Guest
amdx <amdx@knology.net> wrote:

On 11/17/2021 9:57 AM, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
amdx <amdx@knology.net> wrote:

On 11/16/2021 11:06 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

Anyone with a chemistry background?

There are now laundry perfumes and fabric finishes
(that are highly scented) that are not meant to
wash  out.  They toxic substances are very difficult
on folks with allergies, especially asthma.   They
don\'t wash out.

Somewhere that I do not remember, I read that these
toxic substances are alcohol soluble and won\'t wash
out in water.  Am I correct?

Anyway, if alcohol soluble, how do you get them out?
Dump a bottle of rubbing alcohol in the washer?

Any other ideas one way other the other?

Many thanks,
-T
I suggest you call the manufacturers of ODOBAN and ODOR-BAN and ask if

their product would help.

https://odoban.com/what-is-odoban/
https://www.janilink.com/shop/deodorizer-freshener/deodorizer-chemicals/
https://odorban-odor-neutralizer/
Some of the so-called \'fresheners\' are just as bad as the perfumes for
triggering allergies.

 Does that include these two?
I have never come across them, but I am in the UK and they may not be on
sale here. Most things here with \'Fresh\' on the labels are toxic as
hell.

I eliminated two that had a scent, like vanilla citrus. I did suggest
calling the manufacturer to get more info.
I doubt if you will get anything other than a bland statement that their
products are fine or only contain \'natural\' ingredients (such as
D-Limonene, oxalic acid, tannin and aconitine?).


--
~ Liz Tuddenham ~
(Remove the \".invalid\"s and add \".co.uk\" to reply)
www.poppyrecords.co.uk
 
L

Liz Tuddenham

Guest
amdx <amdx@knology.net> wrote:

On 11/17/2021 9:57 AM, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
amdx <amdx@knology.net> wrote:

On 11/16/2021 11:06 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

Anyone with a chemistry background?

There are now laundry perfumes and fabric finishes
(that are highly scented) that are not meant to
wash  out.  They toxic substances are very difficult
on folks with allergies, especially asthma.   They
don\'t wash out.

Somewhere that I do not remember, I read that these
toxic substances are alcohol soluble and won\'t wash
out in water.  Am I correct?

Anyway, if alcohol soluble, how do you get them out?
Dump a bottle of rubbing alcohol in the washer?

Any other ideas one way other the other?

Many thanks,
-T
I suggest you call the manufacturers of ODOBAN and ODOR-BAN and ask if

their product would help.

https://odoban.com/what-is-odoban/
https://www.janilink.com/shop/deodorizer-freshener/deodorizer-chemicals/
https://odorban-odor-neutralizer/
Some of the so-called \'fresheners\' are just as bad as the perfumes for
triggering allergies.

 Does that include these two?
I have never come across them, but I am in the UK and they may not be on
sale here. Most things here with \'Fresh\' on the labels are toxic as
hell.

I eliminated two that had a scent, like vanilla citrus. I did suggest
calling the manufacturer to get more info.
I doubt if you will get anything other than a bland statement that their
products are fine or only contain \'natural\' ingredients (such as
D-Limonene, oxalic acid, tannin and aconitine?).


--
~ Liz Tuddenham ~
(Remove the \".invalid\"s and add \".co.uk\" to reply)
www.poppyrecords.co.uk
 
R

Rick C

Guest
On Wednesday, November 17, 2021 at 4:23:45 AM UTC-4, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 17/11/2021 05:06, T wrote:
Hi All,

Anyone with a chemistry background?

There are now laundry perfumes and fabric finishes
(that are highly scented) that are not meant to
wash out. They toxic substances are very difficult
on folks with allergies, especially asthma. They
don\'t wash out.

Somewhere that I do not remember, I read that these
toxic substances are alcohol soluble and won\'t wash
out in water. Am I correct?
There are lots of fragrances listed at
https://smartlabel.pg.com/00037000754480.html>. These would, in
general, show very limited solubility in water as they are mainly
esters, aldehydes, and cyclic compounds which are highly lipophilic.
I\'m remembering some of my organic chemistry which I took at Hood College, formally an all girls school. Esters are made of a reaction of an alcohol and an acid, each of which has an aliphatic group (simple hydrocarbon). The resulting ester often has a very strong aroma. I want to say we had a lab where we each made a different ester, some were a very nice scent such as banana, but the starting ingredients can be quite foul such as butyric acid.

I don\'t think there would be anything special about esters in terms of hanging onto clothing when washed. But then I recall having trouble getting the funk out of clothes when used for kayaking. That would likely be the butyric acid. Probably just a degree of amount, but possibly there is something created by microbes while waiting to be washed that makes the scent hang. You have to consider there can be agents added specifically to make the scent hang to the clothing. I believe they add compounds to perfumes just for that purpose.

--

Rick C.

-+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
-+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
R

Rick C

Guest
On Wednesday, November 17, 2021 at 4:23:45 AM UTC-4, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 17/11/2021 05:06, T wrote:
Hi All,

Anyone with a chemistry background?

There are now laundry perfumes and fabric finishes
(that are highly scented) that are not meant to
wash out. They toxic substances are very difficult
on folks with allergies, especially asthma. They
don\'t wash out.

Somewhere that I do not remember, I read that these
toxic substances are alcohol soluble and won\'t wash
out in water. Am I correct?
There are lots of fragrances listed at
https://smartlabel.pg.com/00037000754480.html>. These would, in
general, show very limited solubility in water as they are mainly
esters, aldehydes, and cyclic compounds which are highly lipophilic.
I\'m remembering some of my organic chemistry which I took at Hood College, formally an all girls school. Esters are made of a reaction of an alcohol and an acid, each of which has an aliphatic group (simple hydrocarbon). The resulting ester often has a very strong aroma. I want to say we had a lab where we each made a different ester, some were a very nice scent such as banana, but the starting ingredients can be quite foul such as butyric acid.

I don\'t think there would be anything special about esters in terms of hanging onto clothing when washed. But then I recall having trouble getting the funk out of clothes when used for kayaking. That would likely be the butyric acid. Probably just a degree of amount, but possibly there is something created by microbes while waiting to be washed that makes the scent hang. You have to consider there can be agents added specifically to make the scent hang to the clothing. I believe they add compounds to perfumes just for that purpose.

--

Rick C.

-+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
-+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
C

Cydrome Leader

Guest
T <T@invalid.invalid> wrote:
Hi All,

Anyone with a chemistry background?

There are now laundry perfumes and fabric finishes
(that are highly scented) that are not meant to
wash out. They toxic substances are very difficult
on folks with allergies, especially asthma. They
don\'t wash out.

Somewhere that I do not remember, I read that these
toxic substances are alcohol soluble and won\'t wash
out in water. Am I correct?

Anyway, if alcohol soluble, how do you get them out?
Dump a bottle of rubbing alcohol in the washer?

Any other ideas one way other the other?

Many thanks,
-T
Not sure what you\'re after here, but if you want a laundry detergent
itself with no extra smells of any type added, look at the lineup from
Atsko. The no UV hunting detergent and sport wash are the same product
with different labelling. Nothing else comes close to just being detergent
with no additives. The stuff has virtually no odor even if you smell from
the jug itself. It also leaves no weird residues on washed clothing. It\'s
perfect for hypochondriacs or people who just need rags with no residue on
them.
 
C

Cydrome Leader

Guest
T <T@invalid.invalid> wrote:
Hi All,

Anyone with a chemistry background?

There are now laundry perfumes and fabric finishes
(that are highly scented) that are not meant to
wash out. They toxic substances are very difficult
on folks with allergies, especially asthma. They
don\'t wash out.

Somewhere that I do not remember, I read that these
toxic substances are alcohol soluble and won\'t wash
out in water. Am I correct?

Anyway, if alcohol soluble, how do you get them out?
Dump a bottle of rubbing alcohol in the washer?

Any other ideas one way other the other?

Many thanks,
-T
Not sure what you\'re after here, but if you want a laundry detergent
itself with no extra smells of any type added, look at the lineup from
Atsko. The no UV hunting detergent and sport wash are the same product
with different labelling. Nothing else comes close to just being detergent
with no additives. The stuff has virtually no odor even if you smell from
the jug itself. It also leaves no weird residues on washed clothing. It\'s
perfect for hypochondriacs or people who just need rags with no residue on
them.
 
C

Cydrome Leader

Guest
T <T@invalid.invalid> wrote:
Hi All,

Anyone with a chemistry background?

There are now laundry perfumes and fabric finishes
(that are highly scented) that are not meant to
wash out. They toxic substances are very difficult
on folks with allergies, especially asthma. They
don\'t wash out.

Somewhere that I do not remember, I read that these
toxic substances are alcohol soluble and won\'t wash
out in water. Am I correct?

Anyway, if alcohol soluble, how do you get them out?
Dump a bottle of rubbing alcohol in the washer?

Any other ideas one way other the other?

Many thanks,
-T
Not sure what you\'re after here, but if you want a laundry detergent
itself with no extra smells of any type added, look at the lineup from
Atsko. The no UV hunting detergent and sport wash are the same product
with different labelling. Nothing else comes close to just being detergent
with no additives. The stuff has virtually no odor even if you smell from
the jug itself. It also leaves no weird residues on washed clothing. It\'s
perfect for hypochondriacs or people who just need rags with no residue on
them.
 
C

Clifford Heath

Guest
On 17/11/21 9:22 pm, T wrote:
Most
folks without skin irritations to detergents seldom
rise all the soap out of their cloths.
Sorry you\'ve become so sensitive. I have no help to offer you.

For other folk here: residual soap is a problem, even with low-irritant,
low-perfume or low-allergenic washing soaps. I found that I get a
persistent rash (like, 3mo of steroid creams to remove) under my sox or
undies from residual soap. It takes a few days for the rash to come up.

We adopted the practise of putting vinegar in the rinse aid/fabric
treatment section of the washer, and the problem vanished. Better than
fabric treatment products, which didn\'t work for me.

If you get similar symptoms, you might find that helps you too.

CH
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 01:59, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
In my opinion, these chemicals should be banned outright because we have
no way of avoiding them. (Some are already banned as known carcinogens
and other toxins, but the manufacturers are under no obligation to list
the ingredients in perfumes. so they just go on using them.)
100% agree.
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 01:59, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
In my opinion, these chemicals should be banned outright because we have
no way of avoiding them. (Some are already banned as known carcinogens
and other toxins, but the manufacturers are under no obligation to list
the ingredients in perfumes. so they just go on using them.)
100% agree.
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 01:59, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
In my opinion, these chemicals should be banned outright because we have
no way of avoiding them. (Some are already banned as known carcinogens
and other toxins, but the manufacturers are under no obligation to list
the ingredients in perfumes. so they just go on using them.)
100% agree.
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 04:02, Rick C wrote:
On Wednesday, November 17, 2021 at 6:22:16 AM UTC-4, T wrote:

What sort-of works on old cloths (that pick it up
by me sitting in peoples chairs):

You talk about picking it up from other people\'s furniture, but don\'t you smell that as soon as you enter the room or sit in the chair?
Of course. I am a computer consultant. I have to
enter their rooms and sit in their chairs or my
family will starve.
I\'m presently living in Airbnb places for a couple of weeks at a time. I often walk into an apartment only to find it has been fumigated with these sorts of scents. Sometimes I can\'t sleep in the bed right away. I think this is mostly fabric softeners, but sometimes they add special scents to the place when cleaning or even have those plug in fresheners.
Oh and the exhaust from their dryers after using
fabric softeners pollutes the air in the
neighborhood too

To people who aren\'t sensitive, all these scents smell good. To the rest of us it\'s not a lot different from spreading the smell of feces or decaying flesh. Some scents are barely noticeable and not offensive to me, like in the antiperspirants I use. I wonder why they use the scents that are much stronger and easily offend. I guess it\'s still a tiny minority who are sensitive and what sells, sells.
Oh I do not know about \"tiny\". Just under 20% of
the population has breathing issues of one type
or another. Asthma especially.
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 04:02, Rick C wrote:
On Wednesday, November 17, 2021 at 6:22:16 AM UTC-4, T wrote:

What sort-of works on old cloths (that pick it up
by me sitting in peoples chairs):

You talk about picking it up from other people\'s furniture, but don\'t you smell that as soon as you enter the room or sit in the chair?
Of course. I am a computer consultant. I have to
enter their rooms and sit in their chairs or my
family will starve.
I\'m presently living in Airbnb places for a couple of weeks at a time. I often walk into an apartment only to find it has been fumigated with these sorts of scents. Sometimes I can\'t sleep in the bed right away. I think this is mostly fabric softeners, but sometimes they add special scents to the place when cleaning or even have those plug in fresheners.
Oh and the exhaust from their dryers after using
fabric softeners pollutes the air in the
neighborhood too

To people who aren\'t sensitive, all these scents smell good. To the rest of us it\'s not a lot different from spreading the smell of feces or decaying flesh. Some scents are barely noticeable and not offensive to me, like in the antiperspirants I use. I wonder why they use the scents that are much stronger and easily offend. I guess it\'s still a tiny minority who are sensitive and what sells, sells.
Oh I do not know about \"tiny\". Just under 20% of
the population has breathing issues of one type
or another. Asthma especially.
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 04:02, Rick C wrote:
On Wednesday, November 17, 2021 at 6:22:16 AM UTC-4, T wrote:

What sort-of works on old cloths (that pick it up
by me sitting in peoples chairs):

You talk about picking it up from other people\'s furniture, but don\'t you smell that as soon as you enter the room or sit in the chair?
Of course. I am a computer consultant. I have to
enter their rooms and sit in their chairs or my
family will starve.
I\'m presently living in Airbnb places for a couple of weeks at a time. I often walk into an apartment only to find it has been fumigated with these sorts of scents. Sometimes I can\'t sleep in the bed right away. I think this is mostly fabric softeners, but sometimes they add special scents to the place when cleaning or even have those plug in fresheners.
Oh and the exhaust from their dryers after using
fabric softeners pollutes the air in the
neighborhood too

To people who aren\'t sensitive, all these scents smell good. To the rest of us it\'s not a lot different from spreading the smell of feces or decaying flesh. Some scents are barely noticeable and not offensive to me, like in the antiperspirants I use. I wonder why they use the scents that are much stronger and easily offend. I guess it\'s still a tiny minority who are sensitive and what sells, sells.
Oh I do not know about \"tiny\". Just under 20% of
the population has breathing issues of one type
or another. Asthma especially.
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 07:57, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
Some of the so-called \'fresheners\' are just as bad as the perfumes for
triggering allergies.
No fooling!
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 07:57, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
Some of the so-called \'fresheners\' are just as bad as the perfumes for
triggering allergies.
No fooling!
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 07:57, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
Some of the so-called \'fresheners\' are just as bad as the perfumes for
triggering allergies.
No fooling!
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 07:57, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
Some of the so-called \'fresheners\' are just as bad as the perfumes for
triggering allergies.
No fooling!
 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 08:17, amdx wrote:
On 11/17/2021 9:57 AM, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
amdx <amdx@knology.net> wrote:

On 11/16/2021 11:06 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

Anyone with a chemistry background?

There are now laundry perfumes and fabric finishes
(that are highly scented) that are not meant to
wash  out.  They toxic substances are very difficult
on folks with allergies, especially asthma.   They
don\'t wash out.

Somewhere that I do not remember, I read that these
toxic substances are alcohol soluble and won\'t wash
out in water.  Am I correct?

Anyway, if alcohol soluble, how do you get them out?
Dump a bottle of rubbing alcohol in the washer?

Any other ideas one way other the other?

Many thanks,
-T
I suggest you call the manufacturers of ODOBAN and ODOR-BAN and ask if

their product would help.

https://odoban.com/what-is-odoban/
https://www.janilink.com/shop/deodorizer-freshener/deodorizer-chemicals/

https://odorban-odor-neutralizer/
Some of the so-called \'fresheners\' are just as bad as the perfumes for
triggering allergies.

 Does that include these two?
Yup!

I eliminated two that had a scent, like vanilla citrus. I did suggest
calling the manufacturer to get more info.
To clear the house of bad smells, such as fish cooking,
boil a couple of cinnamon sticks.





 
T

T

Guest
On 11/17/21 08:17, amdx wrote:
On 11/17/2021 9:57 AM, Liz Tuddenham wrote:
amdx <amdx@knology.net> wrote:

On 11/16/2021 11:06 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

Anyone with a chemistry background?

There are now laundry perfumes and fabric finishes
(that are highly scented) that are not meant to
wash  out.  They toxic substances are very difficult
on folks with allergies, especially asthma.   They
don\'t wash out.

Somewhere that I do not remember, I read that these
toxic substances are alcohol soluble and won\'t wash
out in water.  Am I correct?

Anyway, if alcohol soluble, how do you get them out?
Dump a bottle of rubbing alcohol in the washer?

Any other ideas one way other the other?

Many thanks,
-T
I suggest you call the manufacturers of ODOBAN and ODOR-BAN and ask if

their product would help.

https://odoban.com/what-is-odoban/
https://www.janilink.com/shop/deodorizer-freshener/deodorizer-chemicals/

https://odorban-odor-neutralizer/
Some of the so-called \'fresheners\' are just as bad as the perfumes for
triggering allergies.

 Does that include these two?
Yup!

I eliminated two that had a scent, like vanilla citrus. I did suggest
calling the manufacturer to get more info.
To clear the house of bad smells, such as fish cooking,
boil a couple of cinnamon sticks.





 
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