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Does a parrot's foot conduct electricity?

M

Michael Terrell

Guest
On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 8:06:48 AM UTC-5, ABLE1 wrote:
Sorry, I must have missed that one.
I use to use a Megger to test the insulation on large DC motors.
NEVER considered touching anything to see the intensity of
the output.

Did think it would do similar that of a Bell Telephone generator
to get night crawlers out of the ground. My dad had one and it
worked quite well. I suspect the Megger would do the same.

As for the Parrot for this thread, it is a innocent bystander.
And as such, should not be used in a lab experiment.
The thread can't end without hearing from Monty Python!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZw35VUBdzo
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 09:39:04 -0000, Phil Allison <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

Jasen Betts wrote:

------------------


Hello,

With all the long conversation on the issue, and not.

Nobody has mentioned the use of a Megohmmeter or Megger to test
the quality or effectiveness of an insulating substance.


** "Megger " is an brand name.

Refers to a high voltage ( 500 or 1000VDC ) ohm meter - with a dial calibrated in megohms. Human skin would likely show as a dead short.
Considering how much that hurts, how much damage do you think you're doing to the equipment you test with it?
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 13:06:40 -0000, ABLE1 <somewhere@nowhere.net> wrote:

On 2/24/2020 2:02 AM, Jasen Betts wrote:
On 2020-02-23, ABLE1 <somewhere@nowhere.net> wrote:
On 2/21/2020 3:56 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?


Hello,

With all the long conversation on the issue, and not.

Nobody has mentioned the use of a Megohmmeter or Megger to test
the quality or effectiveness of an insulating substance.

I did a few days back, I called it by its other name "insulation tester"
and got a response from Phil A.

Sorry, I must have missed that one.
I use to use a Megger to test the insulation on large DC motors.
NEVER considered touching anything to see the intensity of
the output.
Similar to a TENS machine on full power when the victim isn't expecting it.

Did think it would do similar that of a Bell Telephone generator
to get night crawlers out of the ground. My dad had one and it
worked quite well. I suspect the Megger would do the same.

As for the Parrot for this thread, it is a innocent bystander.
And as such, should not be used in a lab experiment.
It's also incapable of learning not to touch the wires!
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 15:52:40 -0000, Michael Terrell <terrell.michael.a@gmail.com> wrote:

On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 8:06:48 AM UTC-5, ABLE1 wrote:

Sorry, I must have missed that one.
I use to use a Megger to test the insulation on large DC motors.
NEVER considered touching anything to see the intensity of
the output.

Did think it would do similar that of a Bell Telephone generator
to get night crawlers out of the ground. My dad had one and it
worked quite well. I suspect the Megger would do the same.

As for the Parrot for this thread, it is a innocent bystander.
And as such, should not be used in a lab experiment.

The thread can't end without hearing from Monty Python!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZw35VUBdzo
If that's the sketch I think it is, I refuse to watch it, it's sick. Everything else from Monty Python is hilarious, but not that.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 12:45:55 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 20:08:45 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 19:57:08 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 18:30:55 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 13:15:28 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

And you shouldn't discount mitigating circumstances if safety is
involved. I was working on my boat, hands covered with salt-water and
figured I'd have no problem with 12V, yet touching the battery leads
reminded me of every little cut, abrasion, torn cuticle, etc., on my
hands. Not lethal maybe, but disagreeable.

I doubt it was even possible to harm you, even a 9V battery on your tongue just stings. Mind you if you're up a ladder anything that gives you a fright can make you fall off. I was painting my neighbour's eaves once and his stupid wife tried to have a bloody conversation with me from below. It was the only time I've used rather strong swearwords at her. Her husband found it amusing.

The salt water and battery thing wasn't dangerous since there needs to
be sufficient current through a vital organ. (the Navy said 100
milliamps - but not how they arrived at that figure) It was
disagreeable enough to make it hard to work on the system.

I heard something I believe is a myth, that someone in the army gave himself a heart attack from a multimeter on resistance mode by holding each end with a cut finger. No way there's many milliamps from those things. I think the accepted amount for death is somewhere around what you said the Navy said (hence breakers trip at 30 or 50mA).

Those old hand-cranked "meggers" (insulation testers) were reputed to
give an impressive shock. I never used one that was the bailiwick of
the antenna people. At a transmitter site I saw one guy have a spark
jump from his ass to the scope cart behind him when the safety
discharge contactors and his shorting stick failed. Old WW2 large HF
transmitter. He wasn't killed but did go into shock after laughing
about it, we had to get him off the mountain and to a hospital.
What a pussy. Awww were his buttocks sore? Hospital indeed....

I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.
With all the timers, pumps, lights, and fans, it seemed like a good
idea to check the conductivity. One side is an insulator the other
reads zero ohms everywhere I checked, even 5 feet apart. The stuff
isn't totally light proof it just attenuates the light ~80%, so I know
the aluminum coating can't be very thick.

One day that will fall down and short something and cause a fire, I'd be careful if I were you.

The potential is there. The lights use a current limiter, but the
open circuit voltage is 80 VDC. Current limiting (300 ma) and the
voltage is 30 volts or so. The pumps are 120 V submersible types and
the prime danger IMO. There is a GFI and 5 amp circuit breaker built
in too.

You probably don't need much current to set fire to that blanket. Is it flammable?

It is plastic so I expect it is flammable, but from my experience with
Mylar, it takes a high temperature without melting.

I just tried it. It wouldn't light readily with a match but the torch
did the job and it sustained a flame once lit.
If you have one to spare, you could have some fun passing current through it when in your garden, then you'd know if it's a fire hazard.

It weighs 50 pounds or so with a large footprint and low center of
gravity,

My house still has fuses. I detest nuisance trips.

My wife's house had plug fuses,
You say "plug fuses" like that's a bad thing. All UK plugs have fuses.

> fabric covered wiring, and no grounds.

Grounds can be dangerous. Consider you touch something that you didn't know was live. Now you need to touch a ground aswell to get a shock. And if that ground is your knee against an appliance while the live is on your finger, your heart is in the middle.

The copper was all black with either oxidation or some coating, and
the enclosed lights had insulation that was falling apart.

She paid an electrician some $3,000 to bring it to code.
Why are Americans obsessed with this "code" thing? In the UK we do whatever we like with our own homes.

I thought
that was a good deal considering the amount of work involved. The
electric range needed 4 wires, and the wall outlets went from 14 AWG
to 12 AWG and 20 amp breakers. I think the only thing that guy didn't
change were the light switches and light fixtures.

I've done some wiring in her house, but I didn't want to tackle that
job.
I'm sure you could have done it for a lot less than $3000 unless it was a 10 bedroom mansion.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 13:20:26 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 20:09:15 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 19:57:08 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.

You mean marijuana farm :)

Actually no. My marijuana days are over. Too many side effects like
gallons of mint chocolate chip ice cream...
Never happened with me, I never got "munchies", just sleepy.

I bought my wife one of the Aerogarden planters for Xmas a year ago,
and was so impressed with how well it worked that I had to have one,
so I built it.

I got her the "harvest" version and paid $129 at the time.
https://www.aerogarden.com/

I already had a light frame for growing seedlings, and got tired of
All gardening makes me tired. I'm way too lazy to make plants work. They're so fussy about everything.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 14:38:20 -0000, Archer <iam@here.com.invalid> wrote:

On Fri, 21 Feb 2020 20:56:42 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?


https://youtu.be/sWg2xScJ6JM

See the above video showing someone in India who is not affected by
240 v passing through his body
This is most likely much more than 240V, but it shows not all Indians are immune:
https://youtu.be/-H2CKMrKqps
 
P

Phil Allison

Guest
Commander Kinsey the Steaming Turd wrote:

---------------------------------------

** "Megger " is an brand name.

Refers to a high voltage ( 500 or 1000VDC ) ohm meter - with a dial calibrated in megohms. Human skin would likely show as a dead short.

Considering how much that hurts,
** Fuck all really.

> how much damage do you think you're doing to the equipment you test with it?

** Absolutely none.

You clueless POS.


...... Phil
 
J

Jasen Betts

Guest
On 2020-02-24, Archer <iam@here.com.invalid> wrote:
On Fri, 21 Feb 2020 20:56:42 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?


https://youtu.be/sWg2xScJ6JM

See the above video showing someone in India who is not affected by
240 v passing through his body
it looks like some sort of trick, there's possibly a triac somewhere in
that setup that's taking most of the current.

--
Jasen.
 
D

default

Guest
On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 20:02:47 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
<CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 13:20:26 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 20:09:15 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 19:57:08 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.

You mean marijuana farm :)

Actually no. My marijuana days are over. Too many side effects like
gallons of mint chocolate chip ice cream...

Never happened with me, I never got "munchies", just sleepy.
Besides the "high" I'd occasionally have total memory recall. I would
be able to remember some of my motorcycle bum days camped along the
Snake River in Idaho for instance. But the memory was in color, the
smell of the wood smoke, sound of the river, my GF, splinters,
mosquito bites, quite literally everything, just like being there
again.
I bought my wife one of the Aerogarden planters for Xmas a year ago,
and was so impressed with how well it worked that I had to have one,
so I built it.

I got her the "harvest" version and paid $129 at the time.
https://www.aerogarden.com/

I already had a light frame for growing seedlings, and got tired of

All gardening makes me tired. I'm way too lazy to make plants work. They're so fussy about everything.
I'm not much better. I do love to cook though, and there's no dried
herb or spice that can sub for the real thing. I really just wanted
basil in the winter... and I like to tinker with stuff and build
things.
 
D

default

Guest
On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 19:28:48 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
<CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 12:45:55 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 20:08:45 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 19:57:08 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 18:30:55 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 13:15:28 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

And you shouldn't discount mitigating circumstances if safety is
involved. I was working on my boat, hands covered with salt-water and
figured I'd have no problem with 12V, yet touching the battery leads
reminded me of every little cut, abrasion, torn cuticle, etc., on my
hands. Not lethal maybe, but disagreeable.

I doubt it was even possible to harm you, even a 9V battery on your tongue just stings. Mind you if you're up a ladder anything that gives you a fright can make you fall off. I was painting my neighbour's eaves once and his stupid wife tried to have a bloody conversation with me from below. It was the only time I've used rather strong swearwords at her. Her husband found it amusing.

The salt water and battery thing wasn't dangerous since there needs to
be sufficient current through a vital organ. (the Navy said 100
milliamps - but not how they arrived at that figure) It was
disagreeable enough to make it hard to work on the system.

I heard something I believe is a myth, that someone in the army gave himself a heart attack from a multimeter on resistance mode by holding each end with a cut finger. No way there's many milliamps from those things. I think the accepted amount for death is somewhere around what you said the Navy said (hence breakers trip at 30 or 50mA).

Those old hand-cranked "meggers" (insulation testers) were reputed to
give an impressive shock. I never used one that was the bailiwick of
the antenna people. At a transmitter site I saw one guy have a spark
jump from his ass to the scope cart behind him when the safety
discharge contactors and his shorting stick failed. Old WW2 large HF
transmitter. He wasn't killed but did go into shock after laughing
about it, we had to get him off the mountain and to a hospital.

What a pussy. Awww were his buttocks sore? Hospital indeed....
I doubt he had control. He started shaking, sat down, passed out and
his extremities were getting cold. The building was cold- a twenty
horse blower in the basement blew air up through the transmitters, 200
watts to 100 kw, in Alaska. The transmitters heated the building.
(mostly 40kw SSB rigs fsk modulated)
I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.
With all the timers, pumps, lights, and fans, it seemed like a good
idea to check the conductivity. One side is an insulator the other
reads zero ohms everywhere I checked, even 5 feet apart. The stuff
isn't totally light proof it just attenuates the light ~80%, so I know
the aluminum coating can't be very thick.

One day that will fall down and short something and cause a fire, I'd be careful if I were you.

The potential is there. The lights use a current limiter, but the
open circuit voltage is 80 VDC. Current limiting (300 ma) and the
voltage is 30 volts or so. The pumps are 120 V submersible types and
the prime danger IMO. There is a GFI and 5 amp circuit breaker built
in too.

You probably don't need much current to set fire to that blanket. Is it flammable?

It is plastic so I expect it is flammable, but from my experience with
Mylar, it takes a high temperature without melting.

I just tried it. It wouldn't light readily with a match but the torch
did the job and it sustained a flame once lit.

If you have one to spare, you could have some fun passing current through it when in your garden, then you'd know if it's a fire hazard.
No thanks.
It weighs 50 pounds or so with a large footprint and low center of
gravity,

My house still has fuses. I detest nuisance trips.

My wife's house had plug fuses,

You say "plug fuses" like that's a bad thing. All UK plugs have fuses.
Those edison-base, screw-in, fuses in a panel? Those turkeys are
expensive if you can even find a source today.
fabric covered wiring, and no grounds.

Grounds can be dangerous. Consider you touch something that you didn't know was live. Now you need to touch a ground aswell to get a shock. And if that ground is your knee against an appliance while the live is on your finger, your heart is in the middle.
The ground is there so metal parts of a device that you may normally
touch won't be above ground potential. Better the fuse blows or the
GFI trips, than the drill you're gripping in your sweaty hand goes
live.
The copper was all black with either oxidation or some coating, and
the enclosed lights had insulation that was falling apart.

She paid an electrician some $3,000 to bring it to code.

Why are Americans obsessed with this "code" thing? In the UK we do whatever we like with our own homes.
The electrical code is there for a reason. It is rare to find a code
requirement that doesn't make sense. I do my own wiring. I don't
take chances with things that can hurt other people.

Employed in industry, some of my work had to pass inspection by
outside under-writers.

In the pharmaceutical industry it was always a war between engineering
and product safety. They want lubricants that can't harm people - the
machines need lubricants that actually work. We want safety valves
and burst disks on our boilers, they are afraid the valves can harbor
bacteria and take them off.

It is nice to be able to point to a requirement for these things...
before it becomes a matter for the lawyers.
I thought
that was a good deal considering the amount of work involved. The
electric range needed 4 wires, and the wall outlets went from 14 AWG
to 12 AWG and 20 amp breakers. I think the only thing that guy didn't
change were the light switches and light fixtures.

I've done some wiring in her house, but I didn't want to tackle that
job.

I'm sure you could have done it for a lot less than $3000 unless it was a 10 bedroom mansion.
I doubt it. Every wire was changed, a new breaker panel installed,
GFI outlets and breakers where needed. It was a two-person job
fishing wires from a sweltering attic down to the rooms. I think they
earned every penny of 3K. $300 went to the power company to provide
an in-ground power delivery to the meter and panel.

I'd be doing it after driving for our bi-monthly visit. I donno about
you, but I'd rather spend my time enjoying my wife's company. If I
want something to do, there's always a door that needs fixing, a
computer to fix, a shelf to install, a tree to trim, etc..
 
A

Archer

Guest
On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 20:08:27 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
<CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

This is most likely much more than 240V, but it shows not all Indians are immune:
https://youtu.be/-H2CKMrKqps
AFAIK that is 11KV in India Railworks

--
Archer
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Tue, 25 Feb 2020 14:46:59 -0000, Archer <iam@here.com.invalid> wrote:

On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 20:08:27 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

This is most likely much more than 240V, but it shows not all Indians are immune:
https://youtu.be/-H2CKMrKqps

AFAIK that is 11KV in India Railworks
Is the UK like that? AFAIK the London underground for example is 400V DC. Still quite sore and dangerous, but not quite as likely to cause instant evaporation.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 01:33:33 -0000, Michael Terrell <terrell.michael.a@gmail.com> wrote:

On Saturday, February 22, 2020 at 6:53:39 PM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 23:50:10 -0000, RheillyPhoull <Rheilly@bigslong.com> wrote:

On 23/02/2020 7:25 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 22:58:20 -0000, RheillyPhoull <Rheilly@bigslong.com
wrote:

On 23/02/2020 4:39 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 05:50:10 -0000, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz
wrote:

On 2020-02-21, Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?

for useful measurements at such high resistances you really need to use
an insulation tester. expect some discomfort.

It's over 20MOhms, that's good enough for me.

A VOM is useless for a proper insulation test.

Are you saying it somehow lies to me?

No but you obviously have no experience in insulation testing.

Arrogant shit.

We've already figured that out, so stop bragging.
Is that a variation of "ner ner ner ner ner I know you are"?
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Tue, 25 Feb 2020 02:06:29 -0000, Phil Allison <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

Commander Kinsey the Steaming Turd wrote:

---------------------------------------

** "Megger " is an brand name.

Refers to a high voltage ( 500 or 1000VDC ) ohm meter - with a dial calibrated in megohms. Human skin would likely show as a dead short.

Considering how much that hurts,

** Fuck all really.
Even a TENS unit fucking hurts. And that's only 110V pulses.

how much damage do you think you're doing to the equipment you test with it?

** Absolutely none.

You clueless POS.
I've seen the results. They're expensive. Do not ever test computer equipment with those things.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Tue, 25 Feb 2020 05:55:56 -0000, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote:

On 2020-02-24, Archer <iam@here.com.invalid> wrote:
On Fri, 21 Feb 2020 20:56:42 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?


https://youtu.be/sWg2xScJ6JM

See the above video showing someone in India who is not affected by
240 v passing through his body

it looks like some sort of trick, there's possibly a triac somewhere in
that setup that's taking most of the current.
Why can't you accept some bodies are different?
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Tue, 25 Feb 2020 10:31:07 -0000, default <default@defaulter.neo> wrote:

On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 20:02:47 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 13:20:26 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 20:09:15 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 19:57:08 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.

You mean marijuana farm :)

Actually no. My marijuana days are over. Too many side effects like
gallons of mint chocolate chip ice cream...

Never happened with me, I never got "munchies", just sleepy.

Besides the "high" I'd occasionally have total memory recall. I would
be able to remember some of my motorcycle bum days camped along the
Snake River in Idaho for instance. But the memory was in color, the
smell of the wood smoke, sound of the river, my GF, splinters,
mosquito bites, quite literally everything, just like being there
again.
The dreams I had while sleeping were much more realistic, like you're describing. But not while I was awake.

I bought my wife one of the Aerogarden planters for Xmas a year ago,
and was so impressed with how well it worked that I had to have one,
so I built it.

I got her the "harvest" version and paid $129 at the time.
https://www.aerogarden.com/

I already had a light frame for growing seedlings, and got tired of

All gardening makes me tired. I'm way too lazy to make plants work. They're so fussy about everything.

I'm not much better. I do love to cook though,
I can't cook for peanuts. I love the invention called the microwave oven.

and there's no dried
herb or spice that can sub for the real thing. I really just wanted
basil in the winter... and I like to tinker with stuff and build
things.
I like to build things, but things that work, like computers. Or stuff made out of wood, like a house extension.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Tue, 25 Feb 2020 11:40:23 -0000, default <default@defaulter.neo> wrote:

On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 19:28:48 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 12:45:55 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 20:08:45 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 19:57:08 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 18:30:55 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 13:15:28 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

And you shouldn't discount mitigating circumstances if safety is
involved. I was working on my boat, hands covered with salt-water and
figured I'd have no problem with 12V, yet touching the battery leads
reminded me of every little cut, abrasion, torn cuticle, etc., on my
hands. Not lethal maybe, but disagreeable.

I doubt it was even possible to harm you, even a 9V battery on your tongue just stings. Mind you if you're up a ladder anything that gives you a fright can make you fall off. I was painting my neighbour's eaves once and his stupid wife tried to have a bloody conversation with me from below. It was the only time I've used rather strong swearwords at her. Her husband found it amusing.

The salt water and battery thing wasn't dangerous since there needs to
be sufficient current through a vital organ. (the Navy said 100
milliamps - but not how they arrived at that figure) It was
disagreeable enough to make it hard to work on the system.

I heard something I believe is a myth, that someone in the army gave himself a heart attack from a multimeter on resistance mode by holding each end with a cut finger. No way there's many milliamps from those things. I think the accepted amount for death is somewhere around what you said the Navy said (hence breakers trip at 30 or 50mA).

Those old hand-cranked "meggers" (insulation testers) were reputed to
give an impressive shock. I never used one that was the bailiwick of
the antenna people. At a transmitter site I saw one guy have a spark
jump from his ass to the scope cart behind him when the safety
discharge contactors and his shorting stick failed. Old WW2 large HF
transmitter. He wasn't killed but did go into shock after laughing
about it, we had to get him off the mountain and to a hospital.

What a pussy. Awww were his buttocks sore? Hospital indeed....

I doubt he had control. He started shaking, sat down, passed out and
his extremities were getting cold. The building was cold- a twenty
horse blower in the basement blew air up through the transmitters, 200
watts to 100 kw, in Alaska. The transmitters heated the building.
(mostly 40kw SSB rigs fsk modulated)
A jolt through a large muscle shouldn't make you do that. He was clearly a pussy.

I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.
With all the timers, pumps, lights, and fans, it seemed like a good
idea to check the conductivity. One side is an insulator the other
reads zero ohms everywhere I checked, even 5 feet apart. The stuff
isn't totally light proof it just attenuates the light ~80%, so I know
the aluminum coating can't be very thick.

One day that will fall down and short something and cause a fire, I'd be careful if I were you.

The potential is there. The lights use a current limiter, but the
open circuit voltage is 80 VDC. Current limiting (300 ma) and the
voltage is 30 volts or so. The pumps are 120 V submersible types and
the prime danger IMO. There is a GFI and 5 amp circuit breaker built
in too.

You probably don't need much current to set fire to that blanket. Is it flammable?

It is plastic so I expect it is flammable, but from my experience with
Mylar, it takes a high temperature without melting.

I just tried it. It wouldn't light readily with a match but the torch
did the job and it sustained a flame once lit.

If you have one to spare, you could have some fun passing current through it when in your garden, then you'd know if it's a fire hazard.

No thanks.
Better to know what it might do without trying it in your house.

It weighs 50 pounds or so with a large footprint and low center of
gravity,

My house still has fuses. I detest nuisance trips.

My wife's house had plug fuses,

You say "plug fuses" like that's a bad thing. All UK plugs have fuses.

Those edison-base, screw-in, fuses in a panel? Those turkeys are
expensive if you can even find a source today.
No, the fuse is inside the plug, meaning every single appliance has its own protection, like this:
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/b6exht/replacing-a-13-amp-fuse-in-a-domestic-uk-electric-plug-b6exht.jpg

fabric covered wiring, and no grounds.

Grounds can be dangerous. Consider you touch something that you didn't know was live. Now you need to touch a ground aswell to get a shock. And if that ground is your knee against an appliance while the live is on your finger, your heart is in the middle.

The ground is there so metal parts of a device that you may normally
touch won't be above ground potential. Better the fuse blows or the
GFI trips, than the drill you're gripping in your sweaty hand goes
live.
Except when it's something else that's live and the earthed thing is forming the other half of the circuit.

The copper was all black with either oxidation or some coating, and
the enclosed lights had insulation that was falling apart.

She paid an electrician some $3,000 to bring it to code.

Why are Americans obsessed with this "code" thing? In the UK we do whatever we like with our own homes.

The electrical code is there for a reason. It is rare to find a code
requirement that doesn't make sense. I do my own wiring. I don't
take chances with things that can hurt other people.
But when it's YOUR house, the government should mind it's own fucking business.

Employed in industry, some of my work had to pass inspection by
outside under-writers.

In the pharmaceutical industry it was always a war between engineering
and product safety. They want lubricants that can't harm people - the
machines need lubricants that actually work. We want safety valves
and burst disks on our boilers, they are afraid the valves can harbor
bacteria and take them off.

It is nice to be able to point to a requirement for these things...
before it becomes a matter for the lawyers.
It would be nice for everything to work rather than pansy about with safety.

I thought
that was a good deal considering the amount of work involved. The
electric range needed 4 wires, and the wall outlets went from 14 AWG
to 12 AWG and 20 amp breakers. I think the only thing that guy didn't
change were the light switches and light fixtures.

I've done some wiring in her house, but I didn't want to tackle that
job.

I'm sure you could have done it for a lot less than $3000 unless it was a 10 bedroom mansion.

I doubt it. Every wire was changed, a new breaker panel installed,
GFI outlets and breakers where needed. It was a two-person job
fishing wires from a sweltering attic down to the rooms. I think they
earned every penny of 3K. $300 went to the power company to provide
an in-ground power delivery to the meter and panel.

I'd be doing it after driving for our bi-monthly visit. I donno about
you, but I'd rather spend my time enjoying my wife's company. If I
want something to do, there's always a door that needs fixing, a
computer to fix, a shelf to install, a tree to trim, etc..
But you could have one it without all that pointless shit. I could rewire my house in a few days at a cost of Ł300. I have one box with 5 fuses in it. No breakers, ever. I don't want nuisance trips.
 
R

RheillyPhoull

Guest
On 27/02/2020 3:27 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 25 Feb 2020 05:55:56 -0000, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote:

On 2020-02-24, Archer <iam@here.com.invalid> wrote:
On Fri, 21 Feb 2020 20:56:42 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own
dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?


https://youtu.be/sWg2xScJ6JM

See the above video showing someone in India who is not affected by
240 v passing through his body

it looks like some sort of trick, there's possibly a triac somewhere in
that setup that's taking most of the current.

Why can't you accept some bodies are different?
So here's a guy supposed to be passing a few amps through his tongue
etc. without any sign of heating or steam, and you believe that.
I imagine you also go along with the old "Cut the lady in half" trick as
well :)
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Wed, 26 Feb 2020 22:07:40 -0000, RheillyPhoull <Rheilly@bigslong.com> wrote:

On 27/02/2020 3:27 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 25 Feb 2020 05:55:56 -0000, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote:

On 2020-02-24, Archer <iam@here.com.invalid> wrote:
On Fri, 21 Feb 2020 20:56:42 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own
dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?


https://youtu.be/sWg2xScJ6JM

See the above video showing someone in India who is not affected by
240 v passing through his body

it looks like some sort of trick, there's possibly a triac somewhere in
that setup that's taking most of the current.

Why can't you accept some bodies are different?

So here's a guy supposed to be passing a few amps through his tongue
etc. without any sign of heating or steam, and you believe that.
I imagine you also go along with the old "Cut the lady in half" trick as
well :)
You missed out the word "briefly".
 
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