Welcome Notice

Register Log in

Does a parrot's foot conduct electricity?

C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?
 

Guest
On Friday, 21 February 2020 20:56:49 UTC, Commander Kinsey wrote:
> My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?

no
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Fri, 21 Feb 2020 21:17:14 -0000, <tabbypurr@gmail.com> wrote:

On Friday, 21 February 2020 20:56:49 UTC, Commander Kinsey wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?

no
I'm going to need some evidence for that.
 
P

Phil Allison

Guest
Commander Kinsey wrote:

---------------------------
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?

** I read a story once about a couple of parrots ( him and her) who liked to roost in a high voltage transformer shack.

They would perch together on one of the 11kV cables, side by side and bill and coo.

One day they perched on two, adjacent cables while an engineer watched them.

Then what he dreaded finally happened.

They lent across to touch beaks.




...... Phil
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Fri, 21 Feb 2020 22:08:17 -0000, Phil Allison <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

Commander Kinsey wrote:

---------------------------
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?



** I read a story once about a couple of parrots ( him and her) who liked to roost in a high voltage transformer shack.

They would perch together on one of the 11kV cables, side by side and bill and coo.

One day they perched on two, adjacent cables while an engineer watched them.

Then what he dreaded finally happened.

They lent across to touch beaks.
11kV is probably enough to go through their feet, I was wondering if 240V would. Since my multimeter says ">20Mohm" on her foot (probes 1cm apart), yet my dry finger is 1Mohm.
 
P

Phil Allison

Guest
Commander Kinsey wrote:

---------------------------
** I read a story once about a couple of parrots ( him and her) who liked to roost in a high voltage transformer shack.

They would perch together on one of the 11kV cables, side by side and bill and coo.

One day they perched on two, adjacent cables while an engineer watched them.

Then what he dreaded finally happened.

They lent across to touch beaks.


11kV is probably enough to go through their feet,
** Eerrr - yes.

I was wondering if 240V would. Since my multimeter says ">20Mohm" on her > foot (probes 1cm apart), yet my dry finger is 1Mohm.
** Some dark skinned races would show even higher readings than your bird.

However, AFAIK none are immune to 240V shocks.



..... Phil
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 00:03:22 -0000, Phil Allison <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

Commander Kinsey wrote:

---------------------------

** I read a story once about a couple of parrots ( him and her) who liked to roost in a high voltage transformer shack.

They would perch together on one of the 11kV cables, side by side and bill and coo.

One day they perched on two, adjacent cables while an engineer watched them.

Then what he dreaded finally happened.

They lent across to touch beaks.


11kV is probably enough to go through their feet,


** Eerrr - yes.

I was wondering if 240V would. Since my multimeter says ">20Mohm" on her > foot (probes 1cm apart), yet my dry finger is 1Mohm.


** Some dark skinned races would show even higher readings than your bird.

However, AFAIK none are immune to 240V shocks.
How can skin colour reduce conductivity? A bird has scaly feet, no human does.

And 20Mohms means one hundredth of a milliamp will flow through it at 240V. You need 50mA to stop your heart.
 
P

Phil Allison

Guest
Commander Kinsey wrote:

---------------------
** I read a story once about a couple of parrots ( him and her) who liked to roost in a high voltage transformer shack.

They would perch together on one of the 11kV cables, side by side and bill and coo.

One day they perched on two, adjacent cables while an engineer watched them.

Then what he dreaded finally happened.

They lent across to touch beaks.


11kV is probably enough to go through their feet,


** Eerrr - yes.

I was wondering if 240V would. Since my multimeter says ">20Mohm" on her > foot (probes 1cm apart), yet my dry finger is 1Mohm.


** Some dark skinned races would show even higher readings than your bird.

However, AFAIK none are immune to 240V shocks.

How can skin colour reduce conductivity?
** Never said it did.

But other differences, common tt dark races do affect the conductivity of hands and fingers.


> A bird has scaly feet,

** Fish have scales, not birds.



And 20Mohms means one hundredth of a milliamp will flow through it at 240V. You need 50mA to stop your heart.
** Massively stupid.

Skin conductivity is highly non-linear with voltage.

Your 1 Mohm skin ought to totally protect you from 240V - but you know dam well that is not the case.

FFS get real.


...... Phil
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 01:50:26 -0000, Phil Allison <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

Commander Kinsey wrote:

---------------------


** I read a story once about a couple of parrots ( him and her) who liked to roost in a high voltage transformer shack.

They would perch together on one of the 11kV cables, side by side and bill and coo.

One day they perched on two, adjacent cables while an engineer watched them.

Then what he dreaded finally happened.

They lent across to touch beaks.


11kV is probably enough to go through their feet,


** Eerrr - yes.

I was wondering if 240V would. Since my multimeter says ">20Mohm" on her > foot (probes 1cm apart), yet my dry finger is 1Mohm.


** Some dark skinned races would show even higher readings than your bird.

However, AFAIK none are immune to 240V shocks.

How can skin colour reduce conductivity?


** Never said it did.

But other differences, common tt dark races do affect the conductivity of hands and fingers.


A bird has scaly feet,

** Fish have scales, not birds.
A bird's foot has the same texture. Thick dry skin that doesn't look like it would conduct much electricity.

And 20Mohms means one hundredth of a milliamp will flow through it at 240V. You need 50mA to stop your heart.


** Massively stupid.

Skin conductivity is highly non-linear with voltage.

Your 1 Mohm skin ought to totally protect you from 240V - but you know dam well that is not the case.

FFS get real.
Wet skin makes a bit of a difference. I've touched 240V with dry skin. It just gave me a jolt. Nothing painful or damaging.
 
R

RheillyPhoull

Guest
On 22/02/2020 6:08 am, Phil Allison wrote:
Commander Kinsey wrote:

---------------------------
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?



** I read a story once about a couple of parrots ( him and her) who liked to roost in a high voltage transformer shack.

They would perch together on one of the 11kV cables, side by side and bill and coo.

One day they perched on two, adjacent cables while an engineer watched them.

Then what he dreaded finally happened.

They lent across to touch beaks.




..... Phil





I heard that sort of event created Kentucky Fried :)
 
P

Phil Allison

Guest
Commander Kinsey wrote:

----------------------

** This dickhead is getting on my goat.

Wet skin makes a bit of a difference.
I've touched 240V with dry skin.
It just gave me a jolt.
Nothing painful or damaging.
** OK Mr know it all, for a bit of excitement, grab hold of of a live 240V wire in one hand and some metal connected to ground in the other.

En - fucking - joy.




..... Phil
 
J

Jasen Betts

Guest
On 2020-02-21, Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?
for useful measurements at such high resistances you really need to use
an insulation tester. expect some discomfort.

--
Jasen.
 
P

Phil Allison

Guest
Jasen Betts wrote:

--------------------

for useful measurements at such high resistances you really need to use
an insulation tester. expect some discomfort.
** How extraordinarily kind heated of you.

IMO, the retarded OP needs a number 12 boot up the arse.



...... Phil
 
D

default

Guest
On Fri, 21 Feb 2020 20:56:42 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
<CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

>My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?

And how do you know she was never shocked?

I'm using electricity to discourage a cat from scratching my window
panes. She hops onto a rail on the deck and proceeds to destroy the
rubber seals on the aluminum bay window...

I got one of those surplus cold-cathode lamp drivers used in early
laptops and rigged a spray of stainless steel wires where she likes to
stand. The shock is high frequency (will light a neon bulb with only
one connection) and unpleasant (I know...) but not lethal. The cat
has learned too. She does occasionally swipe a paw across the wires
to check, but she hasn't touched the window again.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 02:27:33 -0000, RheillyPhoull <Rheilly@bigslong.com> wrote:

On 22/02/2020 6:08 am, Phil Allison wrote:
Commander Kinsey wrote:

---------------------------
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?



** I read a story once about a couple of parrots ( him and her) who liked to roost in a high voltage transformer shack.

They would perch together on one of the 11kV cables, side by side and bill and coo.

One day they perched on two, adjacent cables while an engineer watched them.

Then what he dreaded finally happened.

They lent across to touch beaks.




..... Phil





I heard that sort of event created Kentucky Fried :)
I'd rather eat a human.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 02:39:09 -0000, Phil Allison <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

Commander Kinsey wrote:

----------------------

** This dickhead is getting on my goat.



Wet skin makes a bit of a difference.
I've touched 240V with dry skin.
It just gave me a jolt.
Nothing painful or damaging.


** OK Mr know it all, for a bit of excitement, grab hold of of a live 240V wire in one hand and some metal connected to ground in the other.

En - fucking - joy.
Done that by mistake a few times. Mexican wave with my arms, no harm done. Not even sore, just a fright.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 10:07:48 -0000, Phil Allison <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

Jasen Betts wrote:

--------------------



for useful measurements at such high resistances you really need to use
an insulation tester. expect some discomfort.


** How extraordinarily kind heated of you.

IMO, the retarded OP needs a number 12 boot up the arse.
Grow up.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 05:50:10 -0000, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote:

On 2020-02-21, Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?

for useful measurements at such high resistances you really need to use
an insulation tester. expect some discomfort.
It's over 20MOhms, that's good enough for me.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 13:40:48 -0000, default <default@defaulter.net> wrote:

On Fri, 21 Feb 2020 20:56:42 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:

My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?

And how do you know she was never shocked?
I would have heard a squawk and she would have flown off in panic.

I'm using electricity to discourage a cat from scratching my window
panes. She hops onto a rail on the deck and proceeds to destroy the
rubber seals on the aluminum bay window...

I got one of those surplus cold-cathode lamp drivers used in early
laptops and rigged a spray of stainless steel wires where she likes to
stand. The shock is high frequency (will light a neon bulb with only
one connection) and unpleasant (I know...) but not lethal. The cat
has learned too. She does occasionally swipe a paw across the wires
to check, but she hasn't touched the window again.
ROFL! I've seen electric fences used to annoy cats - there's quite a few on youtube - the cat gets one hell of a fright.
 
R

RheillyPhoull

Guest
On 23/02/2020 4:39 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 05:50:10 -0000, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote:

On 2020-02-21, Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?

for useful measurements at such high resistances you really need to use
an insulation tester. expect some discomfort.

It's over 20MOhms, that's good enough for me.
A VOM is useless for a proper insulation test.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Welcome to EDABoard.com

Sponsor

Top