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Open positions: Quantum computing hardware startup engineeri

N

Nathan Gemelke

Guest
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists building machines no one has before? QuEra Computing Inc is building an engineering team now from the ground up. We are interested in a very broad skill set, ranging from project management to design and prototype of microwave electronics, opto-electronics, high-speed digital and precision analog instrumentation. If you love what you do, and want to learn new things in a fascinating new area, we'd love to hear from you! And if you know the perfect person for this job, please forward this post!

For more information, click the link above and hit "Careers", or inquire at employment a-t quera-computing.com.
 
J

John Larkin

Guest
On Wed, 06 May 2020 23:04:25 +0200, Jeroen Belleman
<jeroen@nospam.please> wrote:

On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman
But you are a quantum computer.

--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com
 
J

Jeroen Belleman

Guest
On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?
I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman
 
N

Nathan Gemelke

Guest
On Wednesday, May 6, 2020 at 5:04:32 PM UTC-4, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman
Jeroen - We like to think of them as an open challenge and emerging opportunity - but you are right - it will take a lot of healthy skepticism and hard work to get down that long road before they are truly useful. If it's the road that matters to you, give us a call.
 
T

Tom Del Rosso

Guest
John Larkin wrote:
On Wed, 06 May 2020 23:04:25 +0200, Jeroen Belleman
jeroen@nospam.please> wrote:

On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman

But you are a quantum computer.
So I've heard, but why don't our brains need cryo cooling?
 
N

Nathan Gemelke

Guest
On Wednesday, May 6, 2020 at 10:56:13 PM UTC-4, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
Nathan Gemelke wrote:
On Wednesday, May 6, 2020 at 5:04:32 PM UTC-4, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman

Jeroen - We like to think of them as an open challenge and emerging
opportunity - but you are right - it will take a lot of healthy
skepticism and hard work to get down that long road before they are
truly useful. If it's the road that matters to you, give us a call.

There is allegedly a web portal somewhere in ibm.com that lets you
upload code that runs on one of their machines, but maybe it's just a
simulator.
Yes, real machines and simulators both. You should expect to see more in the next few years, based on multiple platforms. Some don't even need cryogenics. Early days and and many small steps ahead, but the next couple years should see some good progress.
 

Guest
"Tom Del Rosso" <fizzbintuesday@that-google-mail-domain.com> wrote in
news:r8vso8$68f$1@dont-email.me:

John Larkin wrote:
On Wed, 06 May 2020 23:04:25 +0200, Jeroen Belleman
jeroen@nospam.please> wrote:

On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman

But you are a quantum computer.

So I've heard, but why don't our brains need cryo cooling?
They do that to keep noise and false qbit reads from happening.
We fight through the error funk.
>
Becuase we are not conducting electrons through processing
iterations and machinery. Our 'consciousness' is 'a different
animal' so we do not have "block transfers" to manage and such.
We have "block awareness" and "supressed block recall" if one wants
to call them blocks. I like bubbles.

I like the movie "Brainstorm".

I wish I could perform the same "meditation" Einstein said he did to
gain his most prized enlightenments.

Some think there is a universal consciousness and intelligence to
tap into.
 

Guest
On Wed, 6 May 2020 22:45:24 -0400, "Tom Del Rosso"
<fizzbintuesday@that-google-mail-domain.com> wrote:

John Larkin wrote:
On Wed, 06 May 2020 23:04:25 +0200, Jeroen Belleman
jeroen@nospam.please> wrote:

On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman

But you are a quantum computer.

So I've heard, but why don't our brains need cryo cooling?
Quantum mechanics works at all temperatures.

The qbit cryo things are primitive, but the idea of finding solutions
by quantum superposition is too good for critters not to use.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard
 
T

Tom Del Rosso

Guest
Nathan Gemelke wrote:
On Wednesday, May 6, 2020 at 5:04:32 PM UTC-4, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman

Jeroen - We like to think of them as an open challenge and emerging
opportunity - but you are right - it will take a lot of healthy
skepticism and hard work to get down that long road before they are
truly useful. If it's the road that matters to you, give us a call.
There is allegedly a web portal somewhere in ibm.com that lets you
upload code that runs on one of their machines, but maybe it's just a
simulator.
 
B

Bill Sloman

Guest
On Thursday, May 7, 2020 at 1:32:52 PM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Wed, 6 May 2020 22:45:24 -0400, "Tom Del Rosso"
fizzbintuesday@that-google-mail-domain.com> wrote:

John Larkin wrote:
On Wed, 06 May 2020 23:04:25 +0200, Jeroen Belleman
jeroen@nospam.please> wrote:

On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman

But you are a quantum computer.

So I've heard, but why don't our brains need cryo cooling?

Quantum mechanics works at all temperatures.
But quantum states get perturbed very easily, and higher temperatures mean more frequent perturbations.

The qbit cryo things are primitive, but the idea of finding solutions
by quantum superposition is too good for critters not to use.
Those same critters that implemented error-detection and correction in the genetic code? It's clearly a good idea, but it doesn't seem to have happened either.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney
 
B

Bill Sloman

Guest
On Thursday, May 7, 2020 at 7:18:37 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
On Wed, 06 May 2020 23:04:25 +0200, Jeroen Belleman
jeroen@nospam.please> wrote:

On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

But you are a quantum computer.
Only if you take one of Roger Penrose's sillier speculations seriously.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney
 
J

Jeroen Belleman

Guest
On 2020-05-07 04:45, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
John Larkin wrote:
On Wed, 06 May 2020 23:04:25 +0200, Jeroen Belleman
jeroen@nospam.please> wrote:

On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman

But you are a quantum computer.

So I've heard, but why don't our brains need cryo cooling?
I can't factor large near-primes very well either.

Jeroen
 
J

Jeroen Belleman

Guest
On 2020-05-07 04:56, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
Nathan Gemelke wrote:
On Wednesday, May 6, 2020 at 5:04:32 PM UTC-4, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman

Jeroen - We like to think of them as an open challenge and emerging
opportunity - but you are right - it will take a lot of healthy
skepticism and hard work to get down that long road before they are
truly useful. If it's the road that matters to you, give us a call.

There is allegedly a web portal somewhere in ibm.com that lets you
upload code that runs on one of their machines, but maybe it's just a
simulator.
Have you noticed how no one ever truly explains how quantum
computers are supposed to work? I mean, we get plenty of this
"quantum bits have multiple states simultaneously" nonsense,
but that's just embezzlement. Awe and wonder, but no substance.

In the end, to get a usable result out of a quantum system,
you have to gather statistics, run many of them, or run one
many times or for a long time. That doesn't look very efficient
or scalable.

Oh, you can build gadgets based on quantum behaviour to solve
specific problems, but those would essentially only solve *that*
problem, nothing else. They would be akin to analog computers.

I think it's all just hype.

Jeroen Belleman
 
J

John Doe

Guest
Jeroen Belleman wrote:

Tom Del Rosso wrote:
John Larkin wrote:
Jeroen Belleman wrote:
Nathan Gemelke wrote:

Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

But you are a quantum computer.

So I've heard, but why don't our brains need cryo cooling?
Extremely effective power management?

> I can't factor large near-primes very well either.

Have you ever seen a math contest?
 

Guest
On Thu, 07 May 2020 08:10:50 +0200, Jeroen Belleman
<jeroen@nospam.please> wrote:

On 2020-05-07 04:45, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
John Larkin wrote:
On Wed, 06 May 2020 23:04:25 +0200, Jeroen Belleman
jeroen@nospam.please> wrote:

On 2020-05-06 21:47, Nathan Gemelke wrote:
Anyone looking for a challenge, perhaps a great moment in tech
history, and to join an incredible team of quantum physicists
building machines no one has before?

I think quantum computers are a big swindle.
There. Convince me.

Jeroen Belleman

But you are a quantum computer.

So I've heard, but why don't our brains need cryo cooling?




I can't factor large near-primes very well either.

Jeroen
Actually, some people can.

There was a fad once for public demonstrations of people who could do
amazing math in their heads.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mental_calculator

Some people can hit a ball flying at 100 MPH with a stick.

https://www.npr.org/2016/09/03/492516937/how-a-baseball-batters-brain-reacts-to-a-fast-pitch

450 milliseconds for a ballistic calculation, using wet chemical,
millisecond logic elements.

I knew a guy who would look at the seams on an incoming tennis ball to
learn its spin, so he could factor that into his return english. That
process took a fraction of a second.

I played table tennis with the world's 16th best player. Of course I
couldn't return a single shot. That's even faster than tennis.

I analyze thousands, or maybe trillions, of possible electronic
circuits in parallel, sometimes in my sleep.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard
 
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