Welcome Notice

Register Log in

making wires on circuit board immobile but able to be removed later?...

C

Chuck

Guest
On 12/1/20 2:11 PM, Peter W. wrote:
What would be wrong when using conventional glue sticks?

Conventional glue-sticks have a much lower plastic temperature than the others - Anything lower than about 120 F should be fine. But understand that the melting point is about 175 F. Archival glue-sticks melt from 250 F to 380 F depending on the application. Electronics glue-sticks are designed for hot-temperature application or 350 F to 380 F. In a solid-state device with low voltages and (always) low ambient and operating temperatures, conventional glue-sticks should be fine unless labeled otherwise. Low-voltage unless the sticks carry a UL-94 listing.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
Ok, thanks because I wasn\'t sure. That part of the circuit won\'t be
under heating so I\'m going to go ahead and use the sticks I have.
 
C

Chuck

Guest
On 12/1/20 1:32 PM, Chuck wrote:
On 12/1/20 12:31 PM, John Robertson wrote:
On 2020/12/01 9:29 a.m., John Robertson wrote:
On 2020/12/01 8:52 a.m., ohg...@gmail.com wrote:
On Tuesday, December 1, 2020 at 11:20:44 AM UTC-5, Arie de Muynck
wrote:
On 2020-12-01 15:58, Adrian Caspersz wrote:
On 30/11/2020 23:34, Chuck wrote:
I am in the process of modifying a circuit by adding a small
external
circuit board and then wiring into the main board. I don\'t want the
wires to move around when I\'m done, but yet if I ever need to make
repairs, I want to be able to remove them. I see some people using
hot glue for such matters, but I don\'t think I\'d be able to desolder
the wires later without using a lot of force to remove the hot glue
first. What could I use?

Candle wax?

NO!
Long ago (50+ years) I used that to stabilize selfwound RF inductors.
The copper rotted away within a year. It may depend on the wax type,
bees wax is supposed to be less agressive.

Arie

I would think that candle wax would have dyes and perfumes added.
Lots of coils,  capacitors, transformers, etc. were potted in wax
for decades without issues.  I guess pure beeswax would be the safe
bet though.


I use beeswax for repotting some 1970s flybacks on old GE TVs that we
use in some classic video games made by Nutting Assoc. Works great
and hasn\'t led to any further trouble after upwards of ten years...I
made a simple silicon mold to hold the old core and just warm up and
pour the wax in.

John :-#)#


I should add that beeswax is likely too soft to hold the wire
suspended for any period of time and it melts at lowish temps, it
would probably be of no use to the OP for his application.

John :-#)#


Interesting.  Not to change my own topic here, but I have a 125 KV high
voltage generator that I made myself fifteen years ago for
demonstrational purposes.  The design is not mine, but uses two auto HEI
coils in opposite phase.  To get the voltages needed and not destroy the
coils, they had to be placed under oil.  However.....

Three years ago, after the device had been stored away for almost a
decade, I removed it and its storage container (I always keep any oiled
components in an extra container to contain possible leakage later).
Well, good thing I had the extra container as there was some leakage.
Not much, but enough that I decided to drain and switch out containers.
Done and restored.

Another option at the time of the original build was, instead of using
oil, to place the coils in wax.  I never did this originally, but
decided to make a spare HV section (which only contains the two coils).
This time, I used white canning wax with no additives.  I did this last
year.  The year before, I was worried that the canning wax might crack
upon exposure to heat and cool, so I poured a block and placed it into
an environment with a lot of temperature extremes for a year.  No
cracking after a year, so that\'s when I decided to pour the wax spare
generator section.

Now, just as a precaution, I\'d never take the unit in a hot car, warmed
up from summer heat let\'s say, for any length of time as I\'d be
concerned that the wax might start melting, so that\'s where the oil
filled one would be used.  Where the wax one is stored might vary from
15-100 F, so confident at those temps.

Oil can sure creep right through and out of things!  I have another
homemade device, a high voltage probe, consisting of many resistors in
series.  It can measure up to 100 KV and uses a standard multimeter with
its very high resistance.  I made it 20 years ago.  However, being
stored on the shelf above me right near where I sit here, I noticed some
suspicious spots of what I thought was water at first on the rug this
past summer.  I was perplexed at first and thought my roof might be
leaking until I decided to finger the wet drop one day and rub fingers
together to see if it was in fact water.  I then knew for sure that it
was oil.  Turns out that when I made my HV probe, I exited the resistor
PVC enclosure with a piece of HV multi-stranded TV wire of the kind
often seen coming out of TV flybacks.  Well, although I sealed around
the wire to PVC exit, I didn\'t properly seal the strands themselves.  It
took 19 years, but oil made its way through that wire and was dripping
from the end plugged into the meter.  It\'s not much, maybe five drops in
several months, but definitely a leak.  Not having time to get to this
yet to remedy, I covered over the wire end with a plastic bag and had
this hang out over the shelf side to contain any further leaking.  As of
today, the bag probably contains an ounce of oil.

As for the circuit board, I probably won\'t use wax to hold the wires.  I
like the hot glue idea, which I have in abundance here, and I can always
reheat later to the wires come right back off the board.  I just have to
be sure not to get any of the glue on the soldered traces themselves.
Incidentally, to follow up a bit, I concluded that the reason why the
original oil container leaked was due to thermal expansion of the oil
through the container. The coil containment container was sealed with
gaskets (at the top only) and I think the oil pushed through the gaskets
when temperatures in the environment were higher. Not sure, but the
real test this time will prove/ disprove this as I refilled with oil but
leaving space between the oil and top/ gasket seal.
 
M

Michael Terrell

Guest
On Tuesday, December 1, 2020 at 12:31:31 PM UTC-5, John Robertson wrote:

I should add that beeswax is likely too soft to hold the wire suspended
for any period of time and it melts at lowish temps, it would probably
be of no use to the OP for his application.
John :-#)#
Hard waxes generally contain acids.
 
H

HW

Guest
On Mon, 30 Nov 2020 18:34:09 -0500, Chuck <chuck445@yahoonospam.com>
wrote:

I see some people using hot
glue for such matters, but I don\'t think I\'d be able to desolder the
wires later without using a lot of force to remove the hot glue first.
Hot glue will release nicely with a drop of isopropyl alcohol.
 
G

gregz

Guest
Phil Allison <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:
tschw...@aol.com wrote:

=======================


Not great advice, as most silicones cure with acetic acid, which corrodes circuit boards.
If you must use silicone, use one that is specifically safe for
electronics. There are only a few.


** Just get one labelled \" Neutral Cure \"

These are safe to use with metals like copper and tin.


..... Phil
I tried some on copper once to test. If anything acid cleans copper. After
evaporation no action exists, which is minimal time.

Greg.
 
G

gregz

Guest
RD <randy.day@sasktel.netx> wrote:
In article <rq3vhi$39f$1@dont-email.me>, chuck445@yahoonospam.com
says...

I am in the process of modifying a circuit by adding a small external
circuit board and then wiring into the main board. I don\'t want the
wires to move around when I\'m done, but yet if I ever need to make
repairs, I want to be able to remove them. I see some people using hot

[snip]

Silicone. Lots of different brands & formulations
(RTV, Goop, etc.)

Dab a small bit on an unused corner of the board
and let it dry, to see if it can be peeled off
cleanly.

HTH
Goop is very strong stuff, hard to remove.

Greg
 
T

three_jeeps

Guest
On Monday, November 30, 2020 at 7:00:11 PM UTC-5, RD wrote:
In article <rq3vhi$39f$1...@dont-email.me>, chuc...@yahoonospam.com
says...
I am in the process of modifying a circuit by adding a small external
circuit board and then wiring into the main board. I don\'t want the
wires to move around when I\'m done, but yet if I ever need to make
repairs, I want to be able to remove them. I see some people using hot
[snip]

Silicone. Lots of different brands & formulations
(RTV, Goop, etc.)

Dab a small bit on an unused corner of the board
and let it dry, to see if it can be peeled off
cleanly.

HTH
Look at Dow Chemical for silicon based products that are safe for electronics...I used some of their products in a similar application many many moons ago...damn if I can remember the product numbers...
J
 
D

Dave Platt

Guest
In article <a5799dfb-f0d5-4ffb-adb3-097bfa1e3b7cn@googlegroups.com>,
three_jeeps <jjhudak@gmail.com> wrote:

Look at Dow Chemical for silicon based products that are safe for electronics...I used some of their products in a similar application many many
moons ago...damn if I can remember the product numbers...
Dow 3145 is one such. You won\'t like the price very much, but it\'s
MIL-spec\'ed for this sort of purpose.

Dow\'s Dowsil 737 is a neutral-cure which seems of a similar nature -
not a MIL-spec reference, but it\'s much more affordable.
 
B

bruce bowser

Guest
On Thursday, December 10, 2020 at 1:59:02 AM UTC-5, GS wrote:
RD <rand...@sasktel.netx> wrote:
In article <rq3vhi$39f$1...@dont-email.me>, chuc...@yahoonospam.com
says...

I am in the process of modifying a circuit by adding a small external
circuit board and then wiring into the main board. I don\'t want the
wires to move around when I\'m done, but yet if I ever need to make
repairs, I want to be able to remove them. I see some people using hot

[snip]

Silicone. Lots of different brands & formulations
(RTV, Goop, etc.)

Dab a small bit on an unused corner of the board
and let it dry, to see if it can be peeled off
cleanly.

HTH

Goop is very strong stuff, hard to remove.
I\'m now wondering if liquid nails is a neutral cure or not. I guess I\'ve used it with pot metal or the metal of the side of a panel (not significant).
 
Toggle Sidebar

Welcome to EDABoard.com

Sponsor

Top