Level 1 Charger Plug...

L

legg

Guest
On Thu, 16 Dec 2021 10:14:45 -0800 (PST), Donat Farmer
<donat.farmer@gmail.com> wrote:

Le mercredi 25 mars 2009 à 20 h 29 min 29 s UTC-4, Mikey a écrit :
Had a power failure a couple weeks ago. The power eventually came back
on but my Scientific Atlanta Explorer 2200 cable box didn\'t, it\'s
completely dead. I bought an Explorer 940 to replace it, but I miss the
display that the 2200 has. I would have bought a new 2200 to replace
it, but all the stores in my area were selling the 940 (even my cable
company).
If not too expensive, I\'d like to repair my old 2200 (or have it
repaired). Does anyone have any idea what the problem could be? Could
it be something simple to fix (like replacing a fuse) or something more
complicated (like replacing a power supply)?

J\'ai un explorer scientific Atlanta 2200 de disponible
Je suis à Vaudreuil Dorion.

L\'Explorer est mort depuis 12 ans.

RL
 
K

knuttle

Guest
On 12/28/2021 2:57 AM, rbowman wrote:

> You\'re right. I didn\'t even think at the understanding level.

That\'s where I\'m leaning, which means the entire class can be taught inside
the classroom like most of the other classes are.

I would think there should be a chapter each on each \"thing\" kids need to
know about (perhaps homes, vehicles, measurements, debugging, PCs, etc.).

In each chapter I would think it could dive down into the \"systems\" involved
such as the cooling system for a car, or the plumbing system for a house or
the electrical system for a computer.

My early experience involved repair usually. When the car overheats because the
phenolic impeller in the water pump detached from the shaft you learn
about cooling systems to say nothing of Chrysler\'s decision to use a
plastic impeller.

Repair starts with debug.
Debug ends with isolation of the failed component.
But debug starts with understanding the systems & isolation of the failure.

Without understanding of the system, there\'s no repair possible unless we
teach the kids to just throw parts at the problem.

Admittedly, a _lot_ of cars are fixed by people throwing parts at them! :)

Chrysler product also taught you not all threads a
right handed.

My first Chrysler was a New Yorker which, as I recall, had reverse threaded
lug bolts on one side, but normally threaded lug bolts on the other.

Nobody told me this. After doing the one side, I wrenched off two or three
before I realized \"something\" was very wrong on the other side.

There were no \"warning labels\" in those days. :)

I\'d guess the average high school kid knows as much about how a car
works as how their iPhone does. It\'s all magic.

This is a good observation, where we could add a systems approach to how
basic electronics work also (sci.electronics.repair).
 
R

rbowman

Guest
On 12/28/2021 10:06 AM, knuttle wrote:
On 12/28/2021 2:57 AM, rbowman wrote:

You\'re right. I didn\'t even think at the understanding level.

That\'s where I\'m leaning, which means the entire class can be taught inside
the classroom like most of the other classes are.

I would think there should be a chapter each on each \"thing\" kids need to
know about (perhaps homes, vehicles, measurements, debugging, PCs, etc.).

In each chapter I would think it could dive down into the \"systems\"
involved
such as the cooling system for a car, or the plumbing system for a house or
the electrical system for a computer.

My early experience involved repair usually. When the car overheats
because the phenolic impeller in the water pump detached from the
shaft you learn about cooling systems to say nothing of Chrysler\'s
decision to use a plastic impeller.

Repair starts with debug.
Debug ends with isolation of the failed component.
But debug starts with understanding the systems & isolation of the failure.

Without understanding of the system, there\'s no repair possible unless we
teach the kids to just throw parts at the problem.

Admittedly, a _lot_ of cars are fixed by people throwing parts at them! :)

Debugging is more complex. My first go around was with my \'82 Firebird
which was early in the computer controlled game. It would run fine,
stumble at odd and inconvenient intervals, and then run fine. Carb
problem. but what, with the oxygen sensor, etc. Of course, running down
the tree the measurements were on the low side of the acceptable range.
I finally pulled the carb. There was a solenoid controlled valve to
control the mixture. The problem was what looked like a little piece of
neoprene that would randomly hold the needle open.

I didn\'t feel bad as the guy running the project was having problems
with his Pontiac and it was in and out of the shop as they tried to
debug it. His son was the service manager so they weren\'t screwing him
over.

Another friend bought a Cadillac around the same time that also turned
into a shop queen. He went to visit the car one day to find all the
mechanics standing around poking at the computer like it had fallen off
a passing UFO.


Chrysler product also taught you not all threads a right handed.

My first Chrysler was a New Yorker which, as I recall, had reverse threaded
lug bolts on one side, but normally threaded lug bolts on the other.
Nobody told me this. After doing the one side, I wrenched off two or three
before I realized \"something\" was very wrong on the other side.

There were no \"warning labels\" in those days. :)

It stimulated the market for replacement studs. Most of them did have an
L stamped on the end but who looks at the end of the stud when changing
a tire?

I\'d guess the average high school kid knows as much about how a car
works as how their iPhone does. It\'s all magic.

This is a good observation, where we could add a systems approach to how
basic electronics work also (sci.electronics.repair).

We have a new library that finally opened after a year delay for the
virus. It has a large and well-equipped \'maker space\' that I\'m hoping
attracts at least some kids. There are several 3D printers, laser
cutters, work stations, 3D scanners and so forth. I think there is a
selection of Arduinos and rPis with peripherals too. The library also
subscribes to Make magazine.

https://makezine.com/

There a media labs and so forth for the kids that swing that way. The
opportunities are all there and free except for nominal charges for the
3D printer materials.

The question is what per cent of the kids will make use of it. I don\'t
have high hopes. Like it always was the smart kids will have a field
day. The rest will be watching TikTok videos and could care less. Like
Shaw said when defining \'horticulture\', you can lead a whore to culture
but you can\'t make her think.
 
A

AMuzi

Guest
On 12/28/2021 1:28 PM, rbowman wrote:
On 12/28/2021 10:06 AM, knuttle wrote:
On 12/28/2021 2:57 AM, rbowman wrote:

You\'re right. I didn\'t even think at the understanding
level.

That\'s where I\'m leaning, which means the entire class can
be taught inside
the classroom like most of the other classes are.

I would think there should be a chapter each on each
\"thing\" kids need to
know about (perhaps homes, vehicles, measurements,
debugging, PCs, etc.).

In each chapter I would think it could dive down into the
\"systems\"
involved
such as the cooling system for a car, or the plumbing
system for a house or
the electrical system for a computer.

My early experience involved repair usually. When the car
overheats
because the phenolic impeller in the water pump detached
from the
shaft you learn about cooling systems to say nothing of
Chrysler\'s
decision to use a plastic impeller.

Repair starts with debug.
Debug ends with isolation of the failed component.
But debug starts with understanding the systems &
isolation of the failure.

Without understanding of the system, there\'s no repair
possible unless we
teach the kids to just throw parts at the problem.

Admittedly, a _lot_ of cars are fixed by people throwing
parts at them! :)

Debugging is more complex. My first go around was with my
\'82 Firebird which was early in the computer controlled
game. It would run fine, stumble at odd and inconvenient
intervals, and then run fine. Carb problem. but what, with
the oxygen sensor, etc. Of course, running down the tree the
measurements were on the low side of the acceptable range. I
finally pulled the carb. There was a solenoid controlled
valve to control the mixture. The problem was what looked
like a little piece of neoprene that would randomly hold the
needle open.

I didn\'t feel bad as the guy running the project was having
problems with his Pontiac and it was in and out of the shop
as they tried to debug it. His son was the service manager
so they weren\'t screwing him over.

Another friend bought a Cadillac around the same time that
also turned into a shop queen. He went to visit the car one
day to find all the mechanics standing around poking at the
computer like it had fallen off a passing UFO.


Chrysler product also taught you not all threads a right
handed.

My first Chrysler was a New Yorker which, as I recall, had
reverse threaded
lug bolts on one side, but normally threaded lug bolts on
the other.
Nobody told me this. After doing the one side, I wrenched
off two or three
before I realized \"something\" was very wrong on the other
side.

There were no \"warning labels\" in those days. :)

It stimulated the market for replacement studs. Most of them
did have an L stamped on the end but who looks at the end of
the stud when changing a tire?

I\'d guess the average high school kid knows as much about
how a car
works as how their iPhone does. It\'s all magic.

This is a good observation, where we could add a systems
approach to how
basic electronics work also (sci.electronics.repair).

We have a new library that finally opened after a year delay
for the virus. It has a large and well-equipped \'maker
space\' that I\'m hoping attracts at least some kids. There
are several 3D printers, laser cutters, work stations, 3D
scanners and so forth. I think there is a selection of
Arduinos and rPis with peripherals too. The library also
subscribes to Make magazine.

https://makezine.com/

There a media labs and so forth for the kids that swing that
way. The opportunities are all there and free except for
nominal charges for the 3D printer materials.

The question is what per cent of the kids will make use of
it. I don\'t have high hopes. Like it always was the smart
kids will have a field day. The rest will be watching TikTok
videos and could care less. Like Shaw said when defining
\'horticulture\', you can lead a whore to culture but you
can\'t make her think.

Ahem.
That was the sainted Dorothy Parker.

--
Andrew Muzi
<www.yellowjersey.org/>
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
R

rbowman

Guest
On 12/28/2021 01:30 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 12/28/2021 1:28 PM, rbowman wrote:
On 12/28/2021 10:06 AM, knuttle wrote:
On 12/28/2021 2:57 AM, rbowman wrote:

You\'re right. I didn\'t even think at the understanding
level.

That\'s where I\'m leaning, which means the entire class can
be taught inside
the classroom like most of the other classes are.

I would think there should be a chapter each on each
\"thing\" kids need to
know about (perhaps homes, vehicles, measurements,
debugging, PCs, etc.).

In each chapter I would think it could dive down into the
\"systems\"
involved
such as the cooling system for a car, or the plumbing
system for a house or
the electrical system for a computer.

My early experience involved repair usually. When the car
overheats
because the phenolic impeller in the water pump detached
from the
shaft you learn about cooling systems to say nothing of
Chrysler\'s
decision to use a plastic impeller.

Repair starts with debug.
Debug ends with isolation of the failed component.
But debug starts with understanding the systems &
isolation of the failure.

Without understanding of the system, there\'s no repair
possible unless we
teach the kids to just throw parts at the problem.

Admittedly, a _lot_ of cars are fixed by people throwing
parts at them! :)

Debugging is more complex. My first go around was with my
\'82 Firebird which was early in the computer controlled
game. It would run fine, stumble at odd and inconvenient
intervals, and then run fine. Carb problem. but what, with
the oxygen sensor, etc. Of course, running down the tree the
measurements were on the low side of the acceptable range. I
finally pulled the carb. There was a solenoid controlled
valve to control the mixture. The problem was what looked
like a little piece of neoprene that would randomly hold the
needle open.

I didn\'t feel bad as the guy running the project was having
problems with his Pontiac and it was in and out of the shop
as they tried to debug it. His son was the service manager
so they weren\'t screwing him over.

Another friend bought a Cadillac around the same time that
also turned into a shop queen. He went to visit the car one
day to find all the mechanics standing around poking at the
computer like it had fallen off a passing UFO.


Chrysler product also taught you not all threads a right
handed.

My first Chrysler was a New Yorker which, as I recall, had
reverse threaded
lug bolts on one side, but normally threaded lug bolts on
the other.
Nobody told me this. After doing the one side, I wrenched
off two or three
before I realized \"something\" was very wrong on the other
side.

There were no \"warning labels\" in those days. :)

It stimulated the market for replacement studs. Most of them
did have an L stamped on the end but who looks at the end of
the stud when changing a tire?

I\'d guess the average high school kid knows as much about
how a car
works as how their iPhone does. It\'s all magic.

This is a good observation, where we could add a systems
approach to how
basic electronics work also (sci.electronics.repair).

We have a new library that finally opened after a year delay
for the virus. It has a large and well-equipped \'maker
space\' that I\'m hoping attracts at least some kids. There
are several 3D printers, laser cutters, work stations, 3D
scanners and so forth. I think there is a selection of
Arduinos and rPis with peripherals too. The library also
subscribes to Make magazine.

https://makezine.com/

There a media labs and so forth for the kids that swing that
way. The opportunities are all there and free except for
nominal charges for the 3D printer materials.

The question is what per cent of the kids will make use of
it. I don\'t have high hopes. Like it always was the smart
kids will have a field day. The rest will be watching TikTok
videos and could care less. Like Shaw said when defining
\'horticulture\', you can lead a whore to culture but you
can\'t make her think.





Ahem.
That was the sainted Dorothy Parker.

I stand corrected. Shaw had some snappy quotes but that wasn\'t one of them.

\"Discussing vaccination with a doctor is like discussing vegetarianism
with a butcher.\"

https://www.azquotes.com/author/13418-George_Bernard_Shaw

Apropos to some of the threads in this group...
 
P

Peeler

Guest
On Tue, 28 Dec 2021 21:50:02 -0700, lowbrowwoman, the endlessly driveling,
troll-feeding, senile idiot, blabbered again:


> I stand corrected.

Corrected ...but still blabbering in your bigmouthed manner!

--
Gossiping \"lowbrowwoman\" about herself:
\"Usenet is my blog... I don\'t give a damn if anyone ever reads my posts
but they are useful in marshaling [sic] my thoughts.\"
MID: <iteioiF60jmU1@mid.individual.net>
 
K

knuttle

Guest
On 12/28/2021 2:28 PM, rbowman wrote:

> Debugging is more complex.

Usually only one part fails, so all you need to do is debug to that.
But most people think debugging is harder than it really is, IMHO.

It\'s because they have the mentality of throwing parts at the problem.
Instead of the mentality that should be taught which is to debug it first.
a. Understand how the system works
b. Segregate the system into testable components
c. Isolate the one component that has failed

Replacing it is (usually - but not always) the easy part.

How many times have you seen someone ask on s.e.r how to fix a
non-functional microwave and someone invariably claims you should replace
the diode, without even explaining to that person how to debug if it\'s
actually that diode?

How many times have you seen someone ask on r.a.t how to fix an overheated
cooling system and someone claims you should replace the thermostat (without
even explaining to that person how to debug to see if it is the thermostat)?

How many times have you seen someone ask on a.h.r how to fix a non starting
electrical pump motor and someone tells him to replace the capacitor?

How many times have you seen someone ask how to fix a sputtering engine and
someone claims you should pour seafoam into it (without even debugging)?

How many times has someone said their car wouldn\'t start and someone else
immediately tells them to replace the battery or alternator (without debug)?

This almost complete and total lack of debug is pervasive everywhere.

While a _lot_ of things get fixed by \"throwing parts\" at them, I agree with
you that \"debugging is more complex\" than just throwing parts at a car.

A classic example of where people throw parts is when they don\'t understand
the system which is why debug starts with (a) understanding the system, and
debug ends with (c) isolating the bad part.

What I was taught in the fifties was the process of debug is three steps.
a. Understand
b. Segregate
c. Isolate

What I see people do instead is a single step (which might be three steps).
a. Replace
b. (If that didn\'t work) Replace (something else)
c. (If that still doesn\'t work) Replace (another part)

You see this all the time with ABS related debug where they replace each
wheel sensor or the ABS control modules or even brake components without
first isolating the problem to the failed component.

Rarely is more than one component failed, right?
That\'s a good question though to ask, philosophically speaking, on debug.

How often in your experience has the problem you\'re trying to fix been
caused by multiple failed components?
 
K

knuttle

Guest
On 12/28/2021 11:50 PM, rbowman wrote:

\"Discussing vaccination with a doctor is like discussing vegetarianism
with a butcher.\"
https://www.azquotes.com/author/13418-George_Bernard_Shaw

Apropos to some of the threads in this group...

That\'s a good quote where the threads you speak of are filled with either
the rabit Democrats being completely ignorant of anything science related,
and at the same time the rabid Republicans being just as completely ignorant
that getting the highly modified genetic material injected into your arm
causes your cells to explode making the spike protein which your body treats
both as a \"toxin\" and an \"antigen\" - which is what the immune system
eventually (a few steps down in the process that they don\'t understand)
create short lived antibodies to (and other immune components, as the immune
system is freaking complex by all accounts).

Perhaps a simpler way to summarize the politicized science problem set is

Rabid Democrats: It\'s your body my choice
Rabid Republicans: It\'s my body my choice

Normal people: It\'s a difficult decision given the risk of death is almost
zero (it\'s 99.8% likely you won\'t die in the USA overall and 99.9998% likely
to survive if you\'re a child aged from 5 to 11 in the USA from October 2020
to October 2021 according to the CDC\'s own figures).

The science shows that most people (well more than half) don\'t even get any
symptoms even as almost all of those people who are immune to the disease
are seropositive (which is the case for _many_ immunities such as those to
the common cold or the flu). Some, paradoxically, aren\'t even seropositive
even as the virus itself has a relatively high human transmissibility.

However, enough of actual science.
Nobody seems to care about the science.

Certainly science isn\'t what the rabid {Democrats,Republicans} care about
though. They only care about the politics.

So far it seems _all_ the rabid {Republican,Democrats} are ignorant of the
science (quite a few, frankly, are rather stupid - which can\'t be cured).

The end result though is a politicized scientific experiment.
Rabid Democrat: I\'m scared shitless of a disease so do what I tell you to!
Rabid Republican: I\'m scared shitless of the government so I don\'t trust you!
 
K

knuttle

Guest
On 12/29/2021 2:12 PM, knuttle wrote:

Normal people: It\'s a difficult decision given the risk of death is almost
zero (it\'s 99.8% likely you won\'t die in the USA overall and 99.9998% likely
to survive if you\'re a child aged from 5 to 11 in the USA from October 2020
to October 2021 according to the CDC\'s own figures).

I want all the statements I make to be completely scientifically correct.
Particularly since rabid {Democrats,Republicans} don\'t care about science.

Hence I apologize that I accidentally added an extra unnecessary \"9\" where
the chance any one child has in the USA of not dying from Covid is 99.998%

a. Search term:
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=cdc+children+ages+5-11
b. First link:
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/planning/children.html
(The CDC says to vaccinate them.)
c. Second link:
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/acip/meetings/downloads/slides-2021-11-2-3/03-Covid-Jefferson-508.pdf
(The CDC says kids have a 0.002% chance of dying from it.)

Obviously they don\'t care about the children per se.
Because the risk of Covid to chidlren is less than that of the flu.

What they care about is the children infecting the adults.

Even so, any one adult has a 99.8% chance of not dying from Covid.
However, even 0.2% of a big number is a lot of people overall.

For example, the risk to the United States is 0.2% of 350 million.
That\'s about 700,000 people (which includes the already very sick).

But for any one individual in the USA, the risk is clearly 0.2%.
Anyone claiming otherwise is simply ignoring the scientific facts.
 
J

John

Guest
knuttle <keith_nuttle@sbcglobal.net> wrote
On 12/29/2021 2:12 PM, knuttle wrote:

Normal people: It\'s a difficult decision given the risk of death is
almost
zero (it\'s 99.8% likely you won\'t die in the USA overall and 99.9998%
likely
to survive if you\'re a child aged from 5 to 11 in the USA from October
2020
to October 2021 according to the CDC\'s own figures).

I want all the statements I make to be completely scientifically correct.

They never are. In spades with stupid claims about
\"genetic therapy\" and how mRNA vaccines work.
 
P

Peeler

Guest
On Thu, 30 Dec 2021 07:30:55 +1100, John, better known as cantankerous
trolling senile geezer Rodent Speed, wrote:

<FLUSH the abnormal trolling senile cretin\'s latest trollshit unread>

--
FredXX to Rodent Speed:
\"You are still an idiot and an embarrassment to your country. No wonder
we shipped the likes of you out of the British Isles. Perhaps stupidity
and criminality is inherited after all?\"
Message-ID: <plbf76$gfl$1@dont-email.me>
 
E

Ed Pawlowski

Guest
On 12/29/2021 2:12 PM, knuttle wrote:

Perhaps a simpler way to summarize the politicized science problem set is

Rabid Democrats: It\'s your body my choice
Rabid Republicans: It\'s my body my choice
If that was true, how do you account for the Texas Republican abortion
laws?

You just make up stuff to suite your agenda at the moment.
 
J

John

Guest
Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote
On 12/29/2021 2:12 PM, knuttle wrote:

Perhaps a simpler way to summarize the politicized science problem set is

Rabid Democrats: It\'s your body my choice
Rabid Republicans: It\'s my body my choice

If that was true, how do you account for the Texas Republican abortion
laws?

You just make up stuff to suite your agenda at the moment.

That’s what \'Arlen\' always does.
 
P

Peeler

Guest
On Thu, 30 Dec 2021 09:04:34 +1100, John, better known as cantankerous
trolling senile geezer Rodent Speed, wrote:

<FLUSH the abnormal trolling senile cretin\'s latest trollshit unread>

--
Richard addressing senile Rodent Speed:
\"Shit you\'re thick/pathetic excuse for a troll.\"
MID: <ogoa38$pul$1@news.mixmin.net>
 
R

rbowman

Guest
On 12/29/2021 11:57 AM, knuttle wrote:
How many times have you seen someone ask how to fix a sputtering engine and
someone claims you should pour seafoam into it (without even debugging)?

And sometimes it\'s an informed decision... Pull the Keihin jug or pour
a slug of SeaFoam into the tank and see what happens. No more
sputtering, decision loop complete.
 
R

rbowman

Guest
On 12/29/2021 03:04 PM, John wrote:
Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote
On 12/29/2021 2:12 PM, knuttle wrote:

Perhaps a simpler way to summarize the politicized science problem
set is

Rabid Democrats: It\'s your body my choice
Rabid Republicans: It\'s my body my choice

If that was true, how do you account for the Texas Republican abortion
laws?

You just make up stuff to suite your agenda at the moment.

That’s what \'Arlen\' always does.

Yeah, I\'m starting to have a little deja vu all over again.
 
K

knuttle

Guest
On 12/29/2021 3:30 PM, John wrote:

I want all the statements I make to be completely scientifically correct.

They never are. In spades with stupid claims about
\"genetic therapy\" and how mRNA vaccines work.

Rod Speed (which is who you are),

Find us even a single scientific definition of mRNA that does not have
\"stupid claims\" of it being either \"genetic material\" or related to \"genes\"
(or both) in that definition.

When you give up, then look at yourself in the mirror when it\'s proven that
easily that you are the one making the \"stupid claims\" that aren\'t backed up
in the science.

Since you\'re too stupid to even do the search, here, I\'ll help you:
https://www.google.com/search?q=definition+of+mRNA
 
K

knuttle

Guest
On 12/29/2021 5:00 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

If that was true, how do you account for the Texas Republican abortion
laws?

You just make up stuff to suite your agenda at the moment.

Most people who are rabidly political, like you appear to be, are too stupid
to understand what I\'m going to say below, which means I\'m wasting my time
because you likely don\'t have anywhere near the required intellectual
capacity to comprehend what I\'m about to explain to you.

You\'re not only ignorant.
You\'re also stupid.

But let\'s assume you were simply ignorant.
OK. Let\'s go.

1. The situation:
The rabid Democrats essentially want to take away your right to own a gun
while the rabid Republicans essentially want to take away your right to have
an abortion.

2. The history:
Essentially, the right to own a gun was enshrined in the Constitution, just
as the right to have an abortion was enshrined in the Roe v Wade decision.

3. The rationale:
It\'s impossible for me to explain to you and other idiots like you the
rationale of the founding fathers, but suffice to say it\'s probably the most
discussed topic in American history _why_ the founding fathers put it as the
number two amendment (just after free speech) in the Bill of Rights.

We are not going to hash it out here, so we can just point to what the
Supreme Court has determined which is that it stands as a right that
everyone can own a gun and we leave it at that (since Usenet isn\'t the place
to change what the Supreme Court already decided long ago).

Likewise with what the Supreme Court decided on abortion. They decided it
was a situation of medical privacy. Is it? Who cares. It\'s what the Supreme
Court decided and we have to leave it at that since they decided it was her
body her choice long ago.

4. How they play those games:
Given we have two rights, one which the rabid Democrats want to take away
from us, and one which the rabid Republicans want to take away from us, the
question is whether you recognize _how_ they each go about trying to take
away our rights?f

Clearly you\'re too stupid to recognize _how_ they go about trying to take
away your rights, but most people of average intelligence and above can
easily see that they can\'t go frontal on them.

5. Why can\'t they go frontal?
They can\'t go frontal because that is too strong a \"fortress\" to defeat
directly with a frontal attack. That is, the rabid Democrats can\'t go
frontal against the Bill of Rights and the rabid Republicans can\'t go
frontal against the \"right to privacy\" any more than the Germans could go
frontal against the Maginot Line.

6. So what do they do then when they can\'t go frontal?
They chip away at the walls.

One by one, they make laws which _all_ reduce your protections under the
Bill of Rights and under Roe v Wade. Every one of those laws chips away at
the right you have today to own a gun and to have an abortion.

Neither side gives a shit about the Constitution.
Neither side gives a shit about the Supreme Court.

The rabid Democrats will chip away at your right to own a gun until that
right no longer exist. The rabid Republicans will chip away at your right to
have an abortion until that right no longer exists.

Neither side cares _how_ they chip away at your rights.
They just chip away any way they can get away with.
 
K

knuttle

Guest
On 12/29/2021 7:56 PM, rbowman wrote:

And sometimes it\'s an informed decision... Pull the Keihin jug or pour
a slug of SeaFoam into the tank and see what happens. No more
sputtering, decision loop complete.

What does all those smoke particles do to the super expensive cats?
 
J

John

Guest
knuttle <keith_nuttle@sbcglobal.net> wrote
On 12/29/2021 3:30 PM, John wrote:

I want all the statements I make to be completely scientifically
correct.

They never are. In spades with stupid claims about
\"genetic therapy\" and how mRNA vaccines work.

Find us even a single scientific definition of mRNA that does not have
\"stupid claims\" of it being either \"genetic material\" or related to
\"genes\" (or both) in that definition.

The problem is with the word THERAPY, not genetic.
 

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