Welcome Notice

Register Log in

Inaccurate clamp meter?

C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
I got hold of a second hand one of these:
https://www.torontosurplus.com/rs-components-heme-100-clamp-meter-611-414-clampmeter.html
A HEME 100 clamp meter.
I can't find specs for it online, only a HEME 1010.
I've tried reading a few currents with it (using a brand new battery in it), and it seems to underread a fair bit on DC (0.56A instead of 0.62A) and AC (7.5A instead of 8.5A). It's also susceptible to wires near it - for example if you put the live inside the clamp but the neutral is an inch or so from the outside of the clamp, it reads a bit of that too and gives a higher reading. Are these things supposed to be accurate? Can I adjust it?
 
P

Peeler

Guest
On Sat, 11 May 2019 14:33:40 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (aka "Commander Kinsey",
"James Wilkinson", "Steven Wanker","Bruce Farquar", "Fred Johnson, etc.),
the pathological resident idiot and attention whore of all the uk ngs,
blathered again:

<FLUSH the abnormal sociopathic attention whore's latest idiotic
attention-baiting bullshit unread again>

--
damduck-egg@yahoo.co.uk about Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL)
trolling:
"He is a well known attention seeking troll and every reply you
make feeds him.
Starts many threads most of which die quick as on the UK groups anyone
with sense Kill filed him ages ago which is why he now cross posts to
the US groups for a new audience.
This thread was unusual in that it derived and continued without him
to a large extent and his silly questioning is an attempt to get
noticed again."
MID: <be195d5jh0hktj054mvfu7ef9ap854mjdb@4ax.com>

--
ItsJoanNotJoann addressing Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL):
"You're an annoying troll and I'm done with you and your
stupidity."
MID: <e39a6a7f-9677-4e78-a866-0590fe5bbc38@googlegroups.com>

--
AndyW addressing Birdbrain:
"Troll or idiot?...
You have been presented with a viewpoint with information, reasoning,
historical cases, citations and references to back it up and wilfully
ignore all going back to your idea which has no supporting information."
MID: <KaToA.263621$g93.262397@fx10.am4>

--
Tony944 addressing Birdbrain Macaw:
"I seen and heard many people but you are on top of list being first class
ass hole jerk. ...You fit under unconditional Idiot and should be put in
mental institution.
MID: <VLCdnYC5HK1Z4S3FnZ2dnUU7-dPNnZ2d@giganews.com>

--
Pelican to Birdbrain Macaw:
"Ok. I'm persuaded . You are an idiot."
MID: <obru31$nao$3@dont-email.me>

--
DerbyDad03 addressing Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL):
"Frigging Idiot. Get the hell out of my thread."
MID: <4d907253-b3b9-40d4-be4d-b32d453937e0@googlegroups.com>
 
A

alan_m

Guest
On 11/05/2019 14:33, Commander Kinsey wrote:
I got hold of a second hand one of these:
https://www.torontosurplus.com/rs-components-heme-100-clamp-meter-611-414-clampmeter.html

A HEME 100 clamp meter.
I can't find specs for it online, only a HEME 1010.
I've tried reading a few currents with it (using a brand new battery in
it), and it seems to underread a fair bit on DC (0.56A instead of 0.62A)
and AC (7.5A instead of 8.5A).  It's also susceptible to wires near it -
for example if you put the live inside the clamp but the neutral is an
inch or so from the outside of the clamp, it reads a bit of that too and
gives a higher reading.  Are these things supposed to be accurate?  Can
I adjust it?
How are you measuring the reference currents of 0.62A and 8.5A?

Using the specification of the HEME 1010

You are on the 400Amp range with a resolution of 0.1A
The accuracy is +/-5 digits (+/- 0.5 Amps) plus 1.3% of reading (0.1A)
so the reading is 6A +/-0.6A

If you are using a multimeter as the comparison it may be equally
inaccurate, especially if the internal battery is failing. Often a
failing battery in a multimeter gives high readings.


--
mailto : news {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
 
P

Peeler

Guest
On Sat, 11 May 2019 19:00:52 +0100, anal_m, the notorious troll-feeding
senile idiot, blathered:

> How are you measuring the reference currents of 0.62A and 8.5A?

More relevant question, how does one measure the idiocy of a retarded troll
and his corresponding troll-feeding senile idiot, anal_m?
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sat, 11 May 2019 19:00:52 +0100, alan_m <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote:

On 11/05/2019 14:33, Commander Kinsey wrote:
I got hold of a second hand one of these:
https://www.torontosurplus.com/rs-components-heme-100-clamp-meter-611-414-clampmeter.html

A HEME 100 clamp meter.
I can't find specs for it online, only a HEME 1010.
I've tried reading a few currents with it (using a brand new battery in
it), and it seems to underread a fair bit on DC (0.56A instead of 0.62A)
and AC (7.5A instead of 8.5A). It's also susceptible to wires near it -
for example if you put the live inside the clamp but the neutral is an
inch or so from the outside of the clamp, it reads a bit of that too and
gives a higher reading. Are these things supposed to be accurate? Can
I adjust it?

How are you measuring the reference currents of 0.62A and 8.5A?
The 0.62A was with a decent multimeter connected in the circuit.

The 8.5A was measured both with one of those energy efficiency meters on my house's meter tail, and by knowing what devices were running.

> Using the specification of the HEME 1010

It's a HEME 100, not 1010.

> You are on the 400Amp range with a resolution of 0.1A

There is no range selectable, it's automatic?

The accuracy is +/-5 digits (+/- 0.5 Amps) plus 1.3% of reading (0.1A)
so the reading is 6A +/-0.6A
That's a hell of an error margin, but still way less than what I'm getting.

Also, taking the same reading in the same circuit repeatedly is giving widely varying readings, between 50% too low and 10% too low. I've thrown it in the bin.

If you are using a multimeter as the comparison it may be equally
inaccurate, especially if the internal battery is failing. Often a
failing battery in a multimeter gives high readings.
I know the multimeter is accurate, I've tested it on all sorts of things.
 
A

alan_m

Guest
On 11/05/2019 19:54, Commander Kinsey wrote:


I know the multimeter is accurate, I've tested it on all sorts of things.
The only way you will know that your multimeter is accurate is by having
it calibrated against a known standard, ideally specified to 10x better
than your meter.

At 0.65A a high end Fluke multimeter @ Ł200+ will give 0.65A +/- 0.01A
on a typical Ł50 multimeter Ł50 it will give 0.65A +/-0.09A

Without a specification for what you have purchased, you may have meter
capable of measuring fairly accurately currents in the range 100A to
1000A but not capable of 0 to 10A measurements with any degree of accuracy

Typically you may be trying to measure and compare a 0.65A current with
measuring equipment with a total uncertainty of measurement of around 0.6A

The 8.5A was measured both with one of those energy efficiency meters
on my house's meter tail, and by knowing what devices were running.
So your comparison standard is something British Gas used to give away
for free, possible so inaccurate that it hasn't got a published
specification for its current measuring capability.


--
mailto : news {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
 
P

Peeler

Guest
On Sat, 11 May 2019 22:38:42 +0100, anal_m, the notorious troll-feeding
senile idiot, blathered:


I know the multimeter is accurate, I've tested it on all sorts of things.

The only way you will know that your multimeter is accurate is by having
it calibrated against a known standard, ideally specified to 10x better
than your meter.
What you don't realize, anal_m, you troll-feeding senile arsehole, is that
he really keeps testing his silly baits on you troll-feeding senile asshole
....and very successfully so far!
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sat, 11 May 2019 22:38:42 +0100, alan_m <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote:

On 11/05/2019 19:54, Commander Kinsey wrote:

I know the multimeter is accurate, I've tested it on all sorts of things.

The only way you will know that your multimeter is accurate is by having
it calibrated against a known standard, ideally specified to 10x better
than your meter.
Or by using it to measure a known current on a bulb I know draws a certain current.

At 0.65A a high end Fluke multimeter @ Ł200+ will give 0.65A +/- 0.01A
on a typical Ł50 multimeter Ł50 it will give 0.65A +/-0.09A

Without a specification for what you have purchased, you may have meter
capable of measuring fairly accurately currents in the range 100A to
1000A but not capable of 0 to 10A measurements with any degree of accuracy

Typically you may be trying to measure and compare a 0.65A current with
measuring equipment with a total uncertainty of measurement of around 0.6A

The 8.5A was measured both with one of those energy efficiency meters
on my house's meter tail, and by knowing what devices were running.

So your comparison standard is something British Gas used to give away
for free, possible so inaccurate that it hasn't got a published
specification for its current measuring capability.
"and by knowing what devices were running"
 
A

alan_m

Guest
On 11/05/2019 23:12, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 11 May 2019 22:38:42 +0100, alan_m <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote:

The only way you will know that your multimeter is accurate is by having
it calibrated against a known standard, ideally specified to 10x better
than your meter.

Or by using it to measure a known current on a bulb I know draws a
certain current.


So your comparison standard is something British Gas used to give away
for free, possible so inaccurate that it hasn't got a published
specification for its current measuring capability.

"and by knowing what devices were running"
Plonk

--
mailto : news {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
 
B

Brian Gaff

Guest
If you are measuring volts then ac is best on a calibrated scope of course,
but I've seen some very strange results from clamp meters in the past, and
after all there are a lot of variables going on all at once.
Brian

--
----- --
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk
Blind user, so no pictures please
Note this Signature is meaningless.!
"alan_m" <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote in message
news:gjotmvF9aelU1@mid.individual.net...
On 11/05/2019 19:54, Commander Kinsey wrote:



I know the multimeter is accurate, I've tested it on all sorts of things.

The only way you will know that your multimeter is accurate is by having
it calibrated against a known standard, ideally specified to 10x better
than your meter.

At 0.65A a high end Fluke multimeter @ Ł200+ will give 0.65A +/- 0.01A
on a typical Ł50 multimeter Ł50 it will give 0.65A +/-0.09A

Without a specification for what you have purchased, you may have meter
capable of measuring fairly accurately currents in the range 100A to 1000A
but not capable of 0 to 10A measurements with any degree of accuracy

Typically you may be trying to measure and compare a 0.65A current with
measuring equipment with a total uncertainty of measurement of around 0.6A

The 8.5A was measured both with one of those energy efficiency meters on
my house's meter tail, and by knowing what devices were running.

So your comparison standard is something British Gas used to give away for
free, possible so inaccurate that it hasn't got a published specification
for its current measuring capability.


--
mailto : news {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
The damn thing was inaccurate on plain resistive loads on DC and AC. It's been binned.

On Sun, 12 May 2019 07:49:15 +0100, Brian Gaff <briang1@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

If you are measuring volts then ac is best on a calibrated scope of course,
but I've seen some very strange results from clamp meters in the past, and
after all there are a lot of variables going on all at once.
Brian
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sun, 12 May 2019 08:10:43 +0100, alan_m <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote:

On 11/05/2019 23:12, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 11 May 2019 22:38:42 +0100, alan_m <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote:

The only way you will know that your multimeter is accurate is by having
it calibrated against a known standard, ideally specified to 10x better
than your meter.

Or by using it to measure a known current on a bulb I know draws a
certain current.


So your comparison standard is something British Gas used to give away
for free, possible so inaccurate that it hasn't got a published
specification for its current measuring capability.

"and by knowing what devices were running"

Plonk
Awww was my reply too difficult for you?
 
M

Mr Pounder Esquire

Guest
Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sun, 12 May 2019 08:10:43 +0100, alan_m <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk
wrote:
On 11/05/2019 23:12, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 11 May 2019 22:38:42 +0100, alan_m <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk
wrote:

The only way you will know that your multimeter is accurate is by
having it calibrated against a known standard, ideally specified
to 10x better than your meter.

Or by using it to measure a known current on a bulb I know draws a
certain current.


So your comparison standard is something British Gas used to give
away for free, possible so inaccurate that it hasn't got a
published specification for its current measuring capability.

"and by knowing what devices were running"

Plonk

Awww was my reply too difficult for you?
Fuck off Hucker.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sun, 12 May 2019 17:05:57 +0100, Mr Pounder Esquire <MrPounder@rationalthought.com> wrote:

Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sun, 12 May 2019 08:10:43 +0100, alan_m <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk
wrote:
On 11/05/2019 23:12, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 11 May 2019 22:38:42 +0100, alan_m <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk
wrote:

The only way you will know that your multimeter is accurate is by
having it calibrated against a known standard, ideally specified
to 10x better than your meter.

Or by using it to measure a known current on a bulb I know draws a
certain current.


So your comparison standard is something British Gas used to give
away for free, possible so inaccurate that it hasn't got a
published specification for its current measuring capability.

"and by knowing what devices were running"

Plonk

Awww was my reply too difficult for you?

Fuck off Hucker.
I don't see any useful information from you.... do you even know what a clamp meter is?
 
M

Mr Pounder Esquire

Guest
Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sun, 12 May 2019 17:05:57 +0100, Mr Pounder Esquire
MrPounder@rationalthought.com> wrote:
Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sun, 12 May 2019 08:10:43 +0100, alan_m <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk
wrote:
On 11/05/2019 23:12, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 11 May 2019 22:38:42 +0100, alan_m
junk@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote:

The only way you will know that your multimeter is accurate is by
having it calibrated against a known standard, ideally specified
to 10x better than your meter.

Or by using it to measure a known current on a bulb I know draws a
certain current.


So your comparison standard is something British Gas used to give
away for free, possible so inaccurate that it hasn't got a
published specification for its current measuring capability.

"and by knowing what devices were running"

Plonk

Awww was my reply too difficult for you?

Fuck off Hucker.

I don't see any useful information from you.... do you even know what
a clamp meter is?
I used them 24 years ago with no problems. Now, just fuck off, man with a
degree who can't even use a clamp meter or get a job.
Just, fuck off Hucker.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Sun, 12 May 2019 18:12:27 +0100, Mr Pounder Esquire <MrPounder@rationalthought.com> wrote:

Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sun, 12 May 2019 17:05:57 +0100, Mr Pounder Esquire
MrPounder@rationalthought.com> wrote:
Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sun, 12 May 2019 08:10:43 +0100, alan_m <junk@admac.myzen.co.uk
wrote:
On 11/05/2019 23:12, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 11 May 2019 22:38:42 +0100, alan_m
junk@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote:

The only way you will know that your multimeter is accurate is by
having it calibrated against a known standard, ideally specified
to 10x better than your meter.

Or by using it to measure a known current on a bulb I know draws a
certain current.


So your comparison standard is something British Gas used to give
away for free, possible so inaccurate that it hasn't got a
published specification for its current measuring capability.

"and by knowing what devices were running"

Plonk

Awww was my reply too difficult for you?

Fuck off Hucker.

I don't see any useful information from you.... do you even know what
a clamp meter is?

I used them 24 years ago with no problems. Now, just fuck off, man with a
degree who can't even use a clamp meter or get a job.
Just, fuck off Hucker.
I can use one that works correctly.
 
L

Lucifer

Guest
"If you get the right reading every time it must be a Fluke."

I have a Clamp Leaker 140. Are they any good?
 
A

Andy Bennet

Guest
On 12/05/2019 07:49, Brian Gaff wrote:
If you are measuring volts then ac is best on a calibrated scope of course,
but I've seen some very strange results from clamp meters in the past, and
after all there are a lot of variables going on all at once.
Brian
I didn't know you could measure volts with the clamp part of a clamp meter.

If it is of the newer (as in less than 25 years old) hall effect sensor
devices then it will be more susceptable to stray magnetic fields. There
should be a calibrate/zero button on it somewhere which you should use
just before you clamp on to cancel all these effects out before measurement.
 
L

Lucifer

Guest
On Tue, 14 May 2019 10:36:59 +0100, Andy Bennet <andyb@andy.com>
wrote:

On 12/05/2019 07:49, Brian Gaff wrote:
If you are measuring volts then ac is best on a calibrated scope of course,
but I've seen some very strange results from clamp meters in the past, and
after all there are a lot of variables going on all at once.
Brian


I didn't know you could measure volts with the clamp part of a clamp meter.
You can't.


If it is of the newer (as in less than 25 years old) hall effect sensor
devices then it will be more susceptable to stray magnetic fields. There
should be a calibrate/zero button on it somewhere which you should use
just before you clamp on to cancel all these effects out before measurement.
If you clamp both active and neutral they will cancel out and you
will get no reading.

I have a Clamp Leaker 140.
http://www.multimic.com/assets/e/catalog/e_ca_m140.pdf

http://www.multimic.com/assets/e/instruction_manual/e-ma-m140.pdf

Any idea how old?
 
A

Andy Bennet

Guest
On 14/05/2019 13:31, Lucifer wrote:
On Tue, 14 May 2019 10:36:59 +0100, Andy Bennet <andyb@andy.com
wrote:

On 12/05/2019 07:49, Brian Gaff wrote:
If you are measuring volts then ac is best on a calibrated scope of course,
but I've seen some very strange results from clamp meters in the past, and
after all there are a lot of variables going on all at once.
Brian


I didn't know you could measure volts with the clamp part of a clamp meter.

You can't.


If it is of the newer (as in less than 25 years old) hall effect sensor
devices then it will be more susceptable to stray magnetic fields. There
should be a calibrate/zero button on it somewhere which you should use
just before you clamp on to cancel all these effects out before measurement.

If you clamp both active and neutral they will cancel out and you
will get no reading.

I have a Clamp Leaker 140.
http://www.multimic.com/assets/e/catalog/e_ca_m140.pdf

http://www.multimic.com/assets/e/instruction_manual/e-ma-m140.pdf

Any idea how old?
The EMC BS EN 61326 standard was first released about 2006 so less than
13 years old.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Welcome to EDABoard.com

Sponsor

Top