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how to reduce the mains voltage...

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server

Guest
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 23:12:03 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
wrote:

On Monday, July 13, 2020 at 8:31:34 AM UTC-7, default wrote:
I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.
...

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?

It doesn\'t make much sense to me; ask, instead, the power company to
adjust the line voltage to an acceptable value. The taps in their
transmission line drops are the solution to many such problems, if
they know that you have found an excessive voltage. I\'m not sure
250V average is excessive, but if there are peaks and dips...
I called my power company to complain about the high voltage and they
said it was within spec. The voltage at my place is 250 minimum with
occasional spikes to 260. The spikes are transient but long enough in
duration to be read with a digital voltmeter. And long enough for the
CNC lathe\'s spindle drive to alarm out.
Eric
 
D

default

Guest
On Tue, 14 Jul 2020 09:04:53 -0700, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:

On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 23:12:03 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com
wrote:

On Monday, July 13, 2020 at 8:31:34 AM UTC-7, default wrote:
I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.
...

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?

It doesn\'t make much sense to me; ask, instead, the power company to
adjust the line voltage to an acceptable value. The taps in their
transmission line drops are the solution to many such problems, if
they know that you have found an excessive voltage. I\'m not sure
250V average is excessive, but if there are peaks and dips...
I called my power company to complain about the high voltage and they
said it was within spec. The voltage at my place is 250 minimum with
occasional spikes to 260. The spikes are transient but long enough in
duration to be read with a digital voltmeter. And long enough for the
CNC lathe\'s spindle drive to alarm out.
Eric
It is within spec at 250. (if only just)

Remember when it was 110/220 volts nominal? I suspect as time goes on
it will creep up. Most recent equipment is sophisticated enough to
adapt. I\'m impressed by how consistent it is since their upgrade.
There are three houses that share one transformer, and the lowest I\'ve
seen it is 247 and highest is 252, but most days it is spot-on 250.

My house and the others on this tranny are at the end of the HT line
for this street.
 
D

default

Guest
On Tue, 14 Jul 2020 09:04:53 -0700, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:

On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 23:12:03 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com
wrote:

On Monday, July 13, 2020 at 8:31:34 AM UTC-7, default wrote:
I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.
...

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?

It doesn\'t make much sense to me; ask, instead, the power company to
adjust the line voltage to an acceptable value. The taps in their
transmission line drops are the solution to many such problems, if
they know that you have found an excessive voltage. I\'m not sure
250V average is excessive, but if there are peaks and dips...
I called my power company to complain about the high voltage and they
said it was within spec. The voltage at my place is 250 minimum with
occasional spikes to 260. The spikes are transient but long enough in
duration to be read with a digital voltmeter. And long enough for the
CNC lathe\'s spindle drive to alarm out.
Eric
It is within spec at 250. (if only just)

Remember when it was 110/220 volts nominal? I suspect as time goes on
it will creep up. Most recent equipment is sophisticated enough to
adapt. I\'m impressed by how consistent it is since their upgrade.
There are three houses that share one transformer, and the lowest I\'ve
seen it is 247 and highest is 252, but most days it is spot-on 250.

My house and the others on this tranny are at the end of the HT line
for this street.
 
D

default

Guest
On Tue, 14 Jul 2020 09:04:53 -0700, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:

On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 23:12:03 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com
wrote:

On Monday, July 13, 2020 at 8:31:34 AM UTC-7, default wrote:
I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.
...

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?

It doesn\'t make much sense to me; ask, instead, the power company to
adjust the line voltage to an acceptable value. The taps in their
transmission line drops are the solution to many such problems, if
they know that you have found an excessive voltage. I\'m not sure
250V average is excessive, but if there are peaks and dips...
I called my power company to complain about the high voltage and they
said it was within spec. The voltage at my place is 250 minimum with
occasional spikes to 260. The spikes are transient but long enough in
duration to be read with a digital voltmeter. And long enough for the
CNC lathe\'s spindle drive to alarm out.
Eric
It is within spec at 250. (if only just)

Remember when it was 110/220 volts nominal? I suspect as time goes on
it will creep up. Most recent equipment is sophisticated enough to
adapt. I\'m impressed by how consistent it is since their upgrade.
There are three houses that share one transformer, and the lowest I\'ve
seen it is 247 and highest is 252, but most days it is spot-on 250.

My house and the others on this tranny are at the end of the HT line
for this street.
 
B

Bill Gill

Guest
On 7/14/2020 8:07 AM, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 2020-07-14 07:04, default wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 16:49:33 -0700 (PDT), jurb6006@gmail.com wrote:

Your bill went up because of light bulbs and shit with heating
elements, maybe the microwave if you use it alot, and of course if
you have an electric stove.

Those types of motors usually run more efficiently on slightly higher
voltage. Voltage up, current is the same or lower. Well power
actually, it might be the same current but the phase changes the
power factor. You pay by the watt, not the amp.


I think you are mistaken.

Some years ago I put a voltage stabilizer on a large fan.  (adjustable
AC voltage regulator intended to be used for large motors) As I
adjusted the voltage lower the current dropped linearly until it
reached about 95 VAC then started rising exponentially as I dropped it
lower.

Torque of the motor may be dependent on voltage, but the torque
required for a refrigeration compressor varies with time.  Starting up
with the system equilibrated, there\'s little back-pressure on the
compressor so it is lightly loaded, as back pressure builds the torque
necessary to maintain synchronous speed increases.
snip

But if you have a momentary power dropout, it has to restart into the
full back-pressure of the evaporator.  If the A/C isn\'t a tiny one, I
sure wouldn\'t be mickey-mousing anything that would increase the mains
impedance.

Electrical codes contain a lot of non-obvious and very expensive wisdom.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
My central AC won\'t restart immediately after a dropout. It has
a delay time to allow the pressure to drop.

Bill
 
B

Bill Gill

Guest
On 7/14/2020 8:07 AM, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 2020-07-14 07:04, default wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 16:49:33 -0700 (PDT), jurb6006@gmail.com wrote:

Your bill went up because of light bulbs and shit with heating
elements, maybe the microwave if you use it alot, and of course if
you have an electric stove.

Those types of motors usually run more efficiently on slightly higher
voltage. Voltage up, current is the same or lower. Well power
actually, it might be the same current but the phase changes the
power factor. You pay by the watt, not the amp.


I think you are mistaken.

Some years ago I put a voltage stabilizer on a large fan.  (adjustable
AC voltage regulator intended to be used for large motors) As I
adjusted the voltage lower the current dropped linearly until it
reached about 95 VAC then started rising exponentially as I dropped it
lower.

Torque of the motor may be dependent on voltage, but the torque
required for a refrigeration compressor varies with time.  Starting up
with the system equilibrated, there\'s little back-pressure on the
compressor so it is lightly loaded, as back pressure builds the torque
necessary to maintain synchronous speed increases.
snip

But if you have a momentary power dropout, it has to restart into the
full back-pressure of the evaporator.  If the A/C isn\'t a tiny one, I
sure wouldn\'t be mickey-mousing anything that would increase the mains
impedance.

Electrical codes contain a lot of non-obvious and very expensive wisdom.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
My central AC won\'t restart immediately after a dropout. It has
a delay time to allow the pressure to drop.

Bill
 
B

Bill Gill

Guest
On 7/14/2020 8:07 AM, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 2020-07-14 07:04, default wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 16:49:33 -0700 (PDT), jurb6006@gmail.com wrote:

Your bill went up because of light bulbs and shit with heating
elements, maybe the microwave if you use it alot, and of course if
you have an electric stove.

Those types of motors usually run more efficiently on slightly higher
voltage. Voltage up, current is the same or lower. Well power
actually, it might be the same current but the phase changes the
power factor. You pay by the watt, not the amp.


I think you are mistaken.

Some years ago I put a voltage stabilizer on a large fan.  (adjustable
AC voltage regulator intended to be used for large motors) As I
adjusted the voltage lower the current dropped linearly until it
reached about 95 VAC then started rising exponentially as I dropped it
lower.

Torque of the motor may be dependent on voltage, but the torque
required for a refrigeration compressor varies with time.  Starting up
with the system equilibrated, there\'s little back-pressure on the
compressor so it is lightly loaded, as back pressure builds the torque
necessary to maintain synchronous speed increases.
snip

But if you have a momentary power dropout, it has to restart into the
full back-pressure of the evaporator.  If the A/C isn\'t a tiny one, I
sure wouldn\'t be mickey-mousing anything that would increase the mains
impedance.

Electrical codes contain a lot of non-obvious and very expensive wisdom.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
My central AC won\'t restart immediately after a dropout. It has
a delay time to allow the pressure to drop.

Bill
 
P

Phil Hobbs

Guest
On 2020-07-14 09:12, Bill Gill wrote:
On 7/14/2020 8:07 AM, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 2020-07-14 07:04, default wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 16:49:33 -0700 (PDT), jurb6006@gmail.com wrote:

Your bill went up because of light bulbs and shit with heating
elements, maybe the microwave if you use it alot, and of course if
you have an electric stove.

Those types of motors usually run more efficiently on slightly
higher voltage. Voltage up, current is the same or lower. Well power
actually, it might be the same current but the phase changes the
power factor. You pay by the watt, not the amp.


I think you are mistaken.

Some years ago I put a voltage stabilizer on a large fan.  (adjustable
AC voltage regulator intended to be used for large motors) As I
adjusted the voltage lower the current dropped linearly until it
reached about 95 VAC then started rising exponentially as I dropped it
lower.

Torque of the motor may be dependent on voltage, but the torque
required for a refrigeration compressor varies with time.  Starting up
with the system equilibrated, there\'s little back-pressure on the
compressor so it is lightly loaded, as back pressure builds the torque
necessary to maintain synchronous speed increases.
snip

But if you have a momentary power dropout, it has to restart into the
full back-pressure of the evaporator.  If the A/C isn\'t a tiny one, I
sure wouldn\'t be mickey-mousing anything that would increase the mains
impedance.

Electrical codes contain a lot of non-obvious and very expensive wisdom.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs




My central AC won\'t restart immediately after a dropout.  It has
a delay time to allow the pressure to drop.

Bill
That\'s certainly comforting, but isn\'t universal, at least in smaller
units. The thing I\'d be worried about is a short-that-isnt-a-short--as
in a shorted rectifier in an old-time transformer/rectifier/filter
supply. The current isn\'t enough to blow the mains breaker but is quite
sufficient to make the transformer catch fire.

I lost a very nice Krohn-Hite dual channel filter that way--a \'computer
grade\' capacitor\'s clamp had gotten loose over the years, and it slipped
down and shorted out to the box, resulting in clouds of transformer
smoke. It was a good thing that I was in the lab at the time. Didn\'t
even blow the fuse in the unit. (A bit of fish paper would have been a
nice touch.)

When nobody\'s around, we keep everything turned off at the power bar to
prevent that sort of thing--industrial-type Tripplites, natch.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
http://hobbs-eo.com
 
P

Phil Hobbs

Guest
On 2020-07-14 09:12, Bill Gill wrote:
On 7/14/2020 8:07 AM, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 2020-07-14 07:04, default wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 16:49:33 -0700 (PDT), jurb6006@gmail.com wrote:

Your bill went up because of light bulbs and shit with heating
elements, maybe the microwave if you use it alot, and of course if
you have an electric stove.

Those types of motors usually run more efficiently on slightly
higher voltage. Voltage up, current is the same or lower. Well power
actually, it might be the same current but the phase changes the
power factor. You pay by the watt, not the amp.


I think you are mistaken.

Some years ago I put a voltage stabilizer on a large fan.  (adjustable
AC voltage regulator intended to be used for large motors) As I
adjusted the voltage lower the current dropped linearly until it
reached about 95 VAC then started rising exponentially as I dropped it
lower.

Torque of the motor may be dependent on voltage, but the torque
required for a refrigeration compressor varies with time.  Starting up
with the system equilibrated, there\'s little back-pressure on the
compressor so it is lightly loaded, as back pressure builds the torque
necessary to maintain synchronous speed increases.
snip

But if you have a momentary power dropout, it has to restart into the
full back-pressure of the evaporator.  If the A/C isn\'t a tiny one, I
sure wouldn\'t be mickey-mousing anything that would increase the mains
impedance.

Electrical codes contain a lot of non-obvious and very expensive wisdom.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs




My central AC won\'t restart immediately after a dropout.  It has
a delay time to allow the pressure to drop.

Bill
That\'s certainly comforting, but isn\'t universal, at least in smaller
units. The thing I\'d be worried about is a short-that-isnt-a-short--as
in a shorted rectifier in an old-time transformer/rectifier/filter
supply. The current isn\'t enough to blow the mains breaker but is quite
sufficient to make the transformer catch fire.

I lost a very nice Krohn-Hite dual channel filter that way--a \'computer
grade\' capacitor\'s clamp had gotten loose over the years, and it slipped
down and shorted out to the box, resulting in clouds of transformer
smoke. It was a good thing that I was in the lab at the time. Didn\'t
even blow the fuse in the unit. (A bit of fish paper would have been a
nice touch.)

When nobody\'s around, we keep everything turned off at the power bar to
prevent that sort of thing--industrial-type Tripplites, natch.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
http://hobbs-eo.com
 
P

Phil Hobbs

Guest
On 2020-07-14 09:12, Bill Gill wrote:
On 7/14/2020 8:07 AM, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 2020-07-14 07:04, default wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 16:49:33 -0700 (PDT), jurb6006@gmail.com wrote:

Your bill went up because of light bulbs and shit with heating
elements, maybe the microwave if you use it alot, and of course if
you have an electric stove.

Those types of motors usually run more efficiently on slightly
higher voltage. Voltage up, current is the same or lower. Well power
actually, it might be the same current but the phase changes the
power factor. You pay by the watt, not the amp.


I think you are mistaken.

Some years ago I put a voltage stabilizer on a large fan.  (adjustable
AC voltage regulator intended to be used for large motors) As I
adjusted the voltage lower the current dropped linearly until it
reached about 95 VAC then started rising exponentially as I dropped it
lower.

Torque of the motor may be dependent on voltage, but the torque
required for a refrigeration compressor varies with time.  Starting up
with the system equilibrated, there\'s little back-pressure on the
compressor so it is lightly loaded, as back pressure builds the torque
necessary to maintain synchronous speed increases.
snip

But if you have a momentary power dropout, it has to restart into the
full back-pressure of the evaporator.  If the A/C isn\'t a tiny one, I
sure wouldn\'t be mickey-mousing anything that would increase the mains
impedance.

Electrical codes contain a lot of non-obvious and very expensive wisdom.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs




My central AC won\'t restart immediately after a dropout.  It has
a delay time to allow the pressure to drop.

Bill
That\'s certainly comforting, but isn\'t universal, at least in smaller
units. The thing I\'d be worried about is a short-that-isnt-a-short--as
in a shorted rectifier in an old-time transformer/rectifier/filter
supply. The current isn\'t enough to blow the mains breaker but is quite
sufficient to make the transformer catch fire.

I lost a very nice Krohn-Hite dual channel filter that way--a \'computer
grade\' capacitor\'s clamp had gotten loose over the years, and it slipped
down and shorted out to the box, resulting in clouds of transformer
smoke. It was a good thing that I was in the lab at the time. Didn\'t
even blow the fuse in the unit. (A bit of fish paper would have been a
nice touch.)

When nobody\'s around, we keep everything turned off at the power bar to
prevent that sort of thing--industrial-type Tripplites, natch.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
http://hobbs-eo.com
 
M

M Philbrook

Guest
In article <qkuogfda30qbsoghmqghsoe62b7qnnkirl@4ax.com>,
default@defaulter.net says...
I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.

The increased consumption is tied to how much I run the AC and since
the upgrade I\'ve already had to replace both the compressor and fan
motor run caps. The compressor one died a quiet death, and the fan
cap melted and smoked. The compressor cap went out the week they
changed the transformer and the fan cap about a month later. I put in
higher voltage ones and the AC is back on line.

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?
i Would sayt you need to get them back out there and move a Tap on the
service transformer..

The voltage is too high..
 
M

M Philbrook

Guest
In article <qkuogfda30qbsoghmqghsoe62b7qnnkirl@4ax.com>,
default@defaulter.net says...
I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.

The increased consumption is tied to how much I run the AC and since
the upgrade I\'ve already had to replace both the compressor and fan
motor run caps. The compressor one died a quiet death, and the fan
cap melted and smoked. The compressor cap went out the week they
changed the transformer and the fan cap about a month later. I put in
higher voltage ones and the AC is back on line.

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?
i Would sayt you need to get them back out there and move a Tap on the
service transformer..

The voltage is too high..
 
M

M Philbrook

Guest
In article <qkuogfda30qbsoghmqghsoe62b7qnnkirl@4ax.com>,
default@defaulter.net says...
I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.

The increased consumption is tied to how much I run the AC and since
the upgrade I\'ve already had to replace both the compressor and fan
motor run caps. The compressor one died a quiet death, and the fan
cap melted and smoked. The compressor cap went out the week they
changed the transformer and the fan cap about a month later. I put in
higher voltage ones and the AC is back on line.

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?
i Would sayt you need to get them back out there and move a Tap on the
service transformer..

The voltage is too high..
 
M

~misfit~

Guest
On 14/07/2020 8:08 am, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 11:31:30 -0400, default <default@defaulter.net
wrote:

I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.

The increased consumption is tied to how much I run the AC and since
the upgrade I\'ve already had to replace both the compressor and fan
motor run caps. The compressor one died a quiet death, and the fan
cap melted and smoked. The compressor cap went out the week they
changed the transformer and the fan cap about a month later. I put in
higher voltage ones and the AC is back on line.

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?
Where I live we get 250 volts pretty steadily. In my shop are
several CNC machines, one of which cannot easily tolerate the 250
volts. So I use two buck/boost xmfrs wired in a particular buck
configuration to lower the 3 phase voltage going to that one machine.
Since doing so the machine has not once alarmede out due to over
voltage.
I also wired up a little 120 to 12 volt xmfr in buck configuration
to lower the 125 volts from the outlet to the 110 volts needed for a
tube amp.
There are directions online on how to select the proper sized xmfr
for the load it will be seeing and how to wire the thing in buck
configuration.
Eric
Eric could you please give me directions to on-line info? I\'m looking at dropping the voltage to a
transformer so that I get lower secondaries out of it inexpensively. Single phase. My Google Fu
isn\'t very strong on this one. I remember Big Clive doing similar in one of his videos a while back
but have been unable to find that again.

Cheers,
--
Shaun.

\"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy little classification
in the DSM\"
David Melville

This is not an email and hasn\'t been checked for viruses by any half-arsed self-promoting software.
 
D

default

Guest
On Tue, 11 Aug 2020 22:01:39 +1200, ~misfit~
<shaun.at.pukekohe@gmail.com> wrote:

On 14/07/2020 8:08 am, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 11:31:30 -0400, default <default@defaulter.net
wrote:

I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.

The increased consumption is tied to how much I run the AC and since
the upgrade I\'ve already had to replace both the compressor and fan
motor run caps. The compressor one died a quiet death, and the fan
cap melted and smoked. The compressor cap went out the week they
changed the transformer and the fan cap about a month later. I put in
higher voltage ones and the AC is back on line.

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?
Where I live we get 250 volts pretty steadily. In my shop are
several CNC machines, one of which cannot easily tolerate the 250
volts. So I use two buck/boost xmfrs wired in a particular buck
configuration to lower the 3 phase voltage going to that one machine.
Since doing so the machine has not once alarmede out due to over
voltage.
I also wired up a little 120 to 12 volt xmfr in buck configuration
to lower the 125 volts from the outlet to the 110 volts needed for a
tube amp.
There are directions online on how to select the proper sized xmfr
for the load it will be seeing and how to wire the thing in buck
configuration.
Eric


Eric could you please give me directions to on-line info? I\'m looking at dropping the voltage to a
transformer so that I get lower secondaries out of it inexpensively. Single phase. My Google Fu
isn\'t very strong on this one. I remember Big Clive doing similar in one of his videos a while back
but have been unable to find that again.

Cheers,
http://www.afcaforum.com/attachment.php?id=40251
 
S

server

Guest
On Tue, 11 Aug 2020 22:01:39 +1200, ~misfit~
<shaun.at.pukekohe@gmail.com> wrote:

On 14/07/2020 8:08 am, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 11:31:30 -0400, default <default@defaulter.net
wrote:

I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.

The increased consumption is tied to how much I run the AC and since
the upgrade I\'ve already had to replace both the compressor and fan
motor run caps. The compressor one died a quiet death, and the fan
cap melted and smoked. The compressor cap went out the week they
changed the transformer and the fan cap about a month later. I put in
higher voltage ones and the AC is back on line.

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?
Where I live we get 250 volts pretty steadily. In my shop are
several CNC machines, one of which cannot easily tolerate the 250
volts. So I use two buck/boost xmfrs wired in a particular buck
configuration to lower the 3 phase voltage going to that one machine.
Since doing so the machine has not once alarmede out due to over
voltage.
I also wired up a little 120 to 12 volt xmfr in buck configuration
to lower the 125 volts from the outlet to the 110 volts needed for a
tube amp.
There are directions online on how to select the proper sized xmfr
for the load it will be seeing and how to wire the thing in buck
configuration.
Eric


Eric could you please give me directions to on-line info? I\'m looking at dropping the voltage to a
transformer so that I get lower secondaries out of it inexpensively. Single phase. My Google Fu
isn\'t very strong on this one. I remember Big Clive doing similar in one of his videos a while back
but have been unable to find that again.

Cheers,
Search for buck/boost transformer. Here\'s a link:
https://www.federalpacific.com/tools/buck-boost-transformer-calculator-selector/
Search youtube too, there are lots of videos expalining them.
Eric
 
D

default

Guest
On Tue, 11 Aug 2020 22:01:39 +1200, ~misfit~
<shaun.at.pukekohe@gmail.com> wrote:

On 14/07/2020 8:08 am, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 11:31:30 -0400, default <default@defaulter.net
wrote:

I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.

The increased consumption is tied to how much I run the AC and since
the upgrade I\'ve already had to replace both the compressor and fan
motor run caps. The compressor one died a quiet death, and the fan
cap melted and smoked. The compressor cap went out the week they
changed the transformer and the fan cap about a month later. I put in
higher voltage ones and the AC is back on line.

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?
Where I live we get 250 volts pretty steadily. In my shop are
several CNC machines, one of which cannot easily tolerate the 250
volts. So I use two buck/boost xmfrs wired in a particular buck
configuration to lower the 3 phase voltage going to that one machine.
Since doing so the machine has not once alarmede out due to over
voltage.
I also wired up a little 120 to 12 volt xmfr in buck configuration
to lower the 125 volts from the outlet to the 110 volts needed for a
tube amp.
There are directions online on how to select the proper sized xmfr
for the load it will be seeing and how to wire the thing in buck
configuration.
Eric


Eric could you please give me directions to on-line info? I\'m looking at dropping the voltage to a
transformer so that I get lower secondaries out of it inexpensively. Single phase. My Google Fu
isn\'t very strong on this one. I remember Big Clive doing similar in one of his videos a while back
but have been unable to find that again.

Cheers,
See:
https://sound-au.com/articles/buck-xfmr.htm#s30

Explains \"the proper way\" to wire a buck boost. Both of the methods
shown work, one is just slightly more efficient.

My AC uses 7-8 amps so my 24 VCT transformer is rated at 10 amps or
240 VA.
 
M

~misfit~

Guest
On 12/08/2020 4:36 am, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:
On Tue, 11 Aug 2020 22:01:39 +1200, ~misfit~
shaun.at.pukekohe@gmail.com> wrote:

On 14/07/2020 8:08 am, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 11:31:30 -0400, default <default@defaulter.net
wrote:

I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.

The increased consumption is tied to how much I run the AC and since
the upgrade I\'ve already had to replace both the compressor and fan
motor run caps. The compressor one died a quiet death, and the fan
cap melted and smoked. The compressor cap went out the week they
changed the transformer and the fan cap about a month later. I put in
higher voltage ones and the AC is back on line.

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?
Where I live we get 250 volts pretty steadily. In my shop are
several CNC machines, one of which cannot easily tolerate the 250
volts. So I use two buck/boost xmfrs wired in a particular buck
configuration to lower the 3 phase voltage going to that one machine.
Since doing so the machine has not once alarmede out due to over
voltage.
I also wired up a little 120 to 12 volt xmfr in buck configuration
to lower the 125 volts from the outlet to the 110 volts needed for a
tube amp.
There are directions online on how to select the proper sized xmfr
for the load it will be seeing and how to wire the thing in buck
configuration.
Eric


Eric could you please give me directions to on-line info? I\'m looking at dropping the voltage to a
transformer so that I get lower secondaries out of it inexpensively. Single phase. My Google Fu
isn\'t very strong on this one. I remember Big Clive doing similar in one of his videos a while back
but have been unable to find that again.

Cheers,
Search for buck/boost transformer. Here\'s a link:
https://www.federalpacific.com/tools/buck-boost-transformer-calculator-selector/
Search youtube too, there are lots of videos expalining them.
Eric
Thanks.
--
Shaun.

\"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy little classification
in the DSM\"
David Melville

This is not an email and hasn\'t been checked for viruses by any half-arsed self-promoting software.
 
M

~misfit~

Guest
On 12/08/2020 9:19 am, default wrote:
On Tue, 11 Aug 2020 22:01:39 +1200, ~misfit~
shaun.at.pukekohe@gmail.com> wrote:

On 14/07/2020 8:08 am, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 11:31:30 -0400, default <default@defaulter.net
wrote:

I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.

The increased consumption is tied to how much I run the AC and since
the upgrade I\'ve already had to replace both the compressor and fan
motor run caps. The compressor one died a quiet death, and the fan
cap melted and smoked. The compressor cap went out the week they
changed the transformer and the fan cap about a month later. I put in
higher voltage ones and the AC is back on line.

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?
Where I live we get 250 volts pretty steadily. In my shop are
several CNC machines, one of which cannot easily tolerate the 250
volts. So I use two buck/boost xmfrs wired in a particular buck
configuration to lower the 3 phase voltage going to that one machine.
Since doing so the machine has not once alarmede out due to over
voltage.
I also wired up a little 120 to 12 volt xmfr in buck configuration
to lower the 125 volts from the outlet to the 110 volts needed for a
tube amp.
There are directions online on how to select the proper sized xmfr
for the load it will be seeing and how to wire the thing in buck
configuration.
Eric


Eric could you please give me directions to on-line info? I\'m looking at dropping the voltage to a
transformer so that I get lower secondaries out of it inexpensively. Single phase. My Google Fu
isn\'t very strong on this one. I remember Big Clive doing similar in one of his videos a while back
but have been unable to find that again.

Cheers,

See:
https://sound-au.com/articles/buck-xfmr.htm#s30

Explains \"the proper way\" to wire a buck boost. Both of the methods
shown work, one is just slightly more efficient.

My AC uses 7-8 amps so my 24 VCT transformer is rated at 10 amps or
240 VA.
Cheers. I have a 300 VA 50v output toriod in an amplifier that I want to re-use in an amp that
needs 40 - 45v AC. I\'ll get to calculating...
--
Shaun.

\"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy little classification
in the DSM\"
David Melville

This is not an email and hasn\'t been checked for viruses by any half-arsed self-promoting software.
 
D

default

Guest
On Wed, 12 Aug 2020 14:35:18 +1200, ~misfit~
<shaun.at.pukekohe@gmail.com> wrote:

On 12/08/2020 9:19 am, default wrote:
On Tue, 11 Aug 2020 22:01:39 +1200, ~misfit~
shaun.at.pukekohe@gmail.com> wrote:

On 14/07/2020 8:08 am, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jul 2020 11:31:30 -0400, default <default@defaulter.net
wrote:

I have an older window air conditioner that I\'d like to hang on to for
a few more years. The name plate says it is 220 VAC and since the
power company went through and upgraded the distribution network and
replaced HT and transformers my service which had been running 210-220
volts is now a steady 250 volts and my bill is up ~15%.

The increased consumption is tied to how much I run the AC and since
the upgrade I\'ve already had to replace both the compressor and fan
motor run caps. The compressor one died a quiet death, and the fan
cap melted and smoked. The compressor cap went out the week they
changed the transformer and the fan cap about a month later. I put in
higher voltage ones and the AC is back on line.

I was wondering if putting in 240 VAC to 24VAC center tapped, 10 amp
power transformer, wired to buck the voltage makes any sense?
Where I live we get 250 volts pretty steadily. In my shop are
several CNC machines, one of which cannot easily tolerate the 250
volts. So I use two buck/boost xmfrs wired in a particular buck
configuration to lower the 3 phase voltage going to that one machine.
Since doing so the machine has not once alarmede out due to over
voltage.
I also wired up a little 120 to 12 volt xmfr in buck configuration
to lower the 125 volts from the outlet to the 110 volts needed for a
tube amp.
There are directions online on how to select the proper sized xmfr
for the load it will be seeing and how to wire the thing in buck
configuration.
Eric


Eric could you please give me directions to on-line info? I\'m looking at dropping the voltage to a
transformer so that I get lower secondaries out of it inexpensively. Single phase. My Google Fu
isn\'t very strong on this one. I remember Big Clive doing similar in one of his videos a while back
but have been unable to find that again.

Cheers,

See:
https://sound-au.com/articles/buck-xfmr.htm#s30

Explains \"the proper way\" to wire a buck boost. Both of the methods
shown work, one is just slightly more efficient.

My AC uses 7-8 amps so my 24 VCT transformer is rated at 10 amps or
240 VA.

Cheers. I have a 300 VA 50v output toriod in an amplifier that I want to re-use in an amp that
needs 40 - 45v AC. I\'ll get to calculating...
Toroids are great for that if they aren\'t potted. I used a pair of
large toroids from a surplus store for an audio power amp. The
voltage was borderline for the transistors I was using, so I wound a
few turns on the core and phased it to subtract voltage. I think it
was two turns of wire was ~.8 volts, and I wanted to go down 5 volts.
 
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