\"Hollow\" screw...

C

Cydrome Leader

Guest
Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:
On 1/26/2022 1:44 AM, Mikko OH2HVJ wrote:
Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> writes:

I need a screw (a bit over 1/4\" thread diameter) with a hole
drilled longitudinally throughout its length. The hole as
large as feasible without significantly reducing the strength
to unusable (nebulous term) levels.

Drill a hole to the screw ? If you don\'t have a lathe, you can do this
with a drill press by fixing the screw to the chuck and having the drill
bit stationary. Drill a starting hole with larger drill and through with
a smaller one(s).

?

Why wouldn\'t I thread the screw into a tapped block (to support and
reinforce the threads -- as well as act as a heat sink) -- after coating
it with antiseize (as the drill bit\'s rotation will tend to want
to tighten the screw in the block, possibly making removal more
difficult)?

And, I\'d assume move from smaller diameter bits up through larger ones
to minimize the amount of material being removed with each.

This has the added advantage of giving me prototypes with increasing
IDs that I can torque test (i.e., at what point have I removed
TOO MUCH material and lost strength?). Trying to do this with
ever smaller IDs means having to make (and destroy!) multiple screws
to test (until you find one \"strong enough\").

Brass is easier to work with, but suitable drills work fine with steel,
too.

Why are you asking for help doing possibly the most simple task on a lathe, ever
if you have all the expertise?

You make everything overly complex and still end up with dumb solutions. It\'s
fascinating.

Drilling through the length of a fasterner, isn\'t hard. Drilling thtough even a
1/4-20 bolt can be done by hand with drill and pliers. It\'s not an engineering
challenge. I used to drill through 12-24 screws all the time with just a hardware
store drill bit and thread cutting oil.
 
L

Lasse Langwadt Christensen

Guest
torsdag den 27. januar 2022 kl. 17.54.57 UTC+1 skrev Cydrome Leader:
Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote:
On 1/26/2022 1:44 AM, Mikko OH2HVJ wrote:
Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> writes:

I need a screw (a bit over 1/4\" thread diameter) with a hole
drilled longitudinally throughout its length. The hole as
large as feasible without significantly reducing the strength
to unusable (nebulous term) levels.

Drill a hole to the screw ? If you don\'t have a lathe, you can do this
with a drill press by fixing the screw to the chuck and having the drill
bit stationary. Drill a starting hole with larger drill and through with
a smaller one(s).

?

Why wouldn\'t I thread the screw into a tapped block (to support and
reinforce the threads -- as well as act as a heat sink) -- after coating
it with antiseize (as the drill bit\'s rotation will tend to want
to tighten the screw in the block, possibly making removal more
difficult)?

And, I\'d assume move from smaller diameter bits up through larger ones
to minimize the amount of material being removed with each.

This has the added advantage of giving me prototypes with increasing
IDs that I can torque test (i.e., at what point have I removed
TOO MUCH material and lost strength?). Trying to do this with
ever smaller IDs means having to make (and destroy!) multiple screws
to test (until you find one \"strong enough\").

Brass is easier to work with, but suitable drills work fine with steel,
too.

Why are you asking for help doing possibly the most simple task on a lathe, ever
if you have all the expertise?

You make everything overly complex and still end up with dumb solutions. It\'s
fascinating.

all Dons threads seems to end like that
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 1/26/2022 10:15 AM, Joe Gwinn wrote:
On Tue, 25 Jan 2022 23:24:34 -0700, Don Y
blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

I need a screw (a bit over 1/4\" thread diameter) with a hole
drilled longitudinally throughout its length. The hole as
large as feasible without significantly reducing the strength
to unusable (nebulous term) levels.

I realize I will eventually have to contract a casting or machined
parts.

But, am looking for onesy-twosy quantities to demo a prototype.

I thought I could approximate it using a threaded tube (NOT
a pipe nipple). But, getting premade threaded tubing in that
range seems difficult.

I thought of manually threading a (soft, brass?) pipe of
suitable ID/OD.

Also thought of having one *printed* -- but I\'m not sure getting
the threads right would be practical (driven by how fine the
layers are?). (I think most *plastics* would be too brittle
when torqued in such an application so I\'d have to print in
metal)

I also thought of physically removing the core material from
a COTS screw (drill/cut -- possible with a brass screw?).

Any other options?

Many. But you need to define what you are trying to accomplish here,
versus all the things that didn\'t work, or useful answers may be rare.
What metals are allowed or required?

Stainless and glass. I\'m sure any manufacturing techniques appropriate
to one \"fastener\" will liely NOT be appropriate to the other! :>

It looks like we\'ll make a set of different swages for the stainless
(to get the different \"profiles\" desired) and have them produced to order.
Some form of friction clip along the lines of the one I cited, elsewhere,
to secure them. The profiles should suggest that they aren\'t intended to
be removed (unlike screws which have visible geometries suggestive of
a tool-to-rotate)

But, that can\'t stop anyone determined to drill them out, etc. (in which
case, they\'ll have to deal with the consequences: \"No user serviceable parts
inside\".

Of course, I suspect folks will be considerably less willing to
try dicking with the glass ones! (how are they going to replace
them when they *do* break them? :> )

Abandoning the screw idea means a single packaging solution can apply
to both types of materials. And, I can hack together a reasonable
approximation of a (steel) prototype with COTS parts.

Talking to a guy, today, about glass fabrication techniques. And,
a tour, next week, of a shop to see things first-hand.

This will be interesting!

The quickest solution may be to use a metalworking lathe to make the
needed bit. Unless the following works:
 
C

Cydrome Leader

Guest
Joe Gwinn <joegwinn@comcast.net> wrote:
On Tue, 25 Jan 2022 23:24:34 -0700, Don Y
blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

I need a screw (a bit over 1/4\" thread diameter) with a hole
drilled longitudinally throughout its length. The hole as
large as feasible without significantly reducing the strength
to unusable (nebulous term) levels.

I realize I will eventually have to contract a casting or machined
parts.

But, am looking for onesy-twosy quantities to demo a prototype.

I thought I could approximate it using a threaded tube (NOT
a pipe nipple). But, getting premade threaded tubing in that
range seems difficult.

I thought of manually threading a (soft, brass?) pipe of
suitable ID/OD.

Also thought of having one *printed* -- but I\'m not sure getting
the threads right would be practical (driven by how fine the
layers are?). (I think most *plastics* would be too brittle
when torqued in such an application so I\'d have to print in
metal)

I also thought of physically removing the core material from
a COTS screw (drill/cut -- possible with a brass screw?).

Any other options?

Many. But you need to define what you are trying to accomplish here,
versus all the things that didn\'t work, or useful answers may be rare.
What metals are allowed or required?

The quickest solution may be to use a metalworking lathe to make the
needed bit. Unless the following works:

.<https://www.mcmaster.com/threaded-tubes/hollow-threaded-studs/

Joe Gwinn

That\'s sort of the problem here. He has absolutely no idea what he wants or what
he is even talking about. It\'s all nonsense try to sound \"clever\". Any good info
is shot down with a dumb reply and weird drawn-out reason about why solutions
people with real problems use with success are not valid.

Latest bizarre acronym obsession = COTS. What will it be next?
 
J

Jasen Betts

Guest
On 2022-01-27, Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:
On 1/27/2022 1:21 AM, whit3rd wrote:
On Wednesday, January 26, 2022 at 11:47:20 PM UTC-8, Don Y wrote:
On 1/26/2022 8:54 PM, whit3rd wrote:
On Wednesday, January 26, 2022 at 7:01:04 PM UTC-8, Don Y wrote:

But, if one end of the rivet remains \"blind\", you need something to
grab it/bite into it.

How about drive rivets?
\"Pop\" rivets?

No, not the apply-tension type, the apply-percussion type, that uses
a pin protruding from the head that is struck with a hammer...

But, presumably, the force required wouldn\'t *require* a hammer
as the pin\'s motion is deforming the rivet in a manner simmilar to
the \"early tugs\" on a pop rivet. The final -- higher force -- tug
on the pop rivet is solely to snap the pin; the rivet has already
been deformed (i.e., the pin could be left in place without affecting
the quality of the fastening).

Or, are the rivets made of tougher stuff that requires more force
(e.g., hammer-struck)?

I\'m off to hardware store, today, for some spray paint. I will see if
they have anything that I can evaluate.

some are plastic and need the pin, some are metal and permanently
deform, but probably still need the pin.


--
Jasen.
 
L

legg

Guest
On Thu, 27 Jan 2022 06:29:31 -0700, Don Y
<blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

On 1/26/2022 6:41 AM, legg wrote:
On Tue, 25 Jan 2022 23:24:34 -0700, Don Y
blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

I need a screw (a bit over 1/4\" thread diameter) with a hole
drilled longitudinally throughout its length. The hole as
large as feasible without significantly reducing the strength
to unusable (nebulous term) levels.

I realize I will eventually have to contract a casting or machined
parts.

But, am looking for onesy-twosy quantities to demo a prototype.

I thought I could approximate it using a threaded tube (NOT
a pipe nipple). But, getting premade threaded tubing in that
range seems difficult.

I thought of manually threading a (soft, brass?) pipe of
suitable ID/OD.

Also thought of having one *printed* -- but I\'m not sure getting
the threads right would be practical (driven by how fine the
layers are?). (I think most *plastics* would be too brittle
when torqued in such an application so I\'d have to print in
metal)

I also thought of physically removing the core material from
a COTS screw (drill/cut -- possible with a brass screw?).

Any other options?

Look at bicycle caliper brake adjustment hardware.

Thread OD typically 0.225in - possibly an M5 or M6 thread.

That\'s an idea! I\'ve not owned a bike in years so can\'t recall
the details but I do recall their presence by the brake levers
(effectively altering the ratio of inner cable to outer sheath)

Tends to be Aluminum in the caliper adjustment, but longer and
brass in the presta valve. Tubes are easier to come by and are
regularly trashed, so maybe easier to get.

RL
 
C

Cydrome Leader

Guest
Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:
On 1/26/2022 10:15 AM, Joe Gwinn wrote:
On Tue, 25 Jan 2022 23:24:34 -0700, Don Y
blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

I need a screw (a bit over 1/4\" thread diameter) with a hole
drilled longitudinally throughout its length. The hole as
large as feasible without significantly reducing the strength
to unusable (nebulous term) levels.

I realize I will eventually have to contract a casting or machined
parts.

But, am looking for onesy-twosy quantities to demo a prototype.

I thought I could approximate it using a threaded tube (NOT
a pipe nipple). But, getting premade threaded tubing in that
range seems difficult.

I thought of manually threading a (soft, brass?) pipe of
suitable ID/OD.

Also thought of having one *printed* -- but I\'m not sure getting
the threads right would be practical (driven by how fine the
layers are?). (I think most *plastics* would be too brittle
when torqued in such an application so I\'d have to print in
metal)

I also thought of physically removing the core material from
a COTS screw (drill/cut -- possible with a brass screw?).

Any other options?

Many. But you need to define what you are trying to accomplish here,
versus all the things that didn\'t work, or useful answers may be rare.
What metals are allowed or required?

Stainless and glass. I\'m sure any manufacturing techniques appropriate
to one \"fastener\" will liely NOT be appropriate to the other! :

It looks like we\'ll make a set of different swages for the stainless
(to get the different \"profiles\" desired) and have them produced to order.
Some form of friction clip along the lines of the one I cited, elsewhere,
to secure them. The profiles should suggest that they aren\'t intended to
be removed (unlike screws which have visible geometries suggestive of
a tool-to-rotate)

But, that can\'t stop anyone determined to drill them out, etc. (in which
case, they\'ll have to deal with the consequences: \"No user serviceable parts
inside\".

Of course, I suspect folks will be considerably less willing to
try dicking with the glass ones! (how are they going to replace
them when they *do* break them? :> )

Abandoning the screw idea means a single packaging solution can apply
to both types of materials. And, I can hack together a reasonable
approximation of a (steel) prototype with COTS parts.

Talking to a guy, today, about glass fabrication techniques. And,
a tour, next week, of a shop to see things first-hand.

This will be interesting!

The quickest solution may be to use a metalworking lathe to make the
needed bit. Unless the following works:

Blowhard rating : 10+

This guy went from can\'t drill a hole in a 1/4-20 bolt to custom swages
and glass fabrication tecniques to avoid visible geometries.

Classic. Keep these coming! I want to hear how you attack the unsolved
problem of keeping a stack of papers connected to each other so they don\'t
get lost, out of order and can be handled as one unit.
 
D

Dan Purgert

Guest
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Hash: SHA512

Cydrome Leader wrote:
[...]
Classic. Keep these coming! I want to hear how you attack the unsolved
problem of keeping a stack of papers connected to each other so they
don\'t get lost, out of order and can be handled as one unit.

Obviously a (diagonal) stripe along the edges such that any misalignment
is visible.

Granted, this doesn\'t solve losing a page, but any other method would
have you losing the entire stack! Obviously it\'s the superior choice.

(the above to be read with tongue firmly in cheek :) )

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--
|_|O|_| Github: https://github.com/dpurgert
|_|_|O| PGP: DDAB 23FB 19FA 7D85 1CC1 E067 6D65 70E5 4CE7 2860
|O|O|O|
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 1/28/2022 6:29 AM, legg wrote:
On Thu, 27 Jan 2022 06:29:31 -0700, Don Y
blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

On 1/26/2022 6:41 AM, legg wrote:
On Tue, 25 Jan 2022 23:24:34 -0700, Don Y
blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

I need a screw (a bit over 1/4\" thread diameter) with a hole
drilled longitudinally throughout its length. The hole as
large as feasible without significantly reducing the strength
to unusable (nebulous term) levels.

I realize I will eventually have to contract a casting or machined
parts.

But, am looking for onesy-twosy quantities to demo a prototype.

I thought I could approximate it using a threaded tube (NOT
a pipe nipple). But, getting premade threaded tubing in that
range seems difficult.

I thought of manually threading a (soft, brass?) pipe of
suitable ID/OD.

Also thought of having one *printed* -- but I\'m not sure getting
the threads right would be practical (driven by how fine the
layers are?). (I think most *plastics* would be too brittle
when torqued in such an application so I\'d have to print in
metal)

I also thought of physically removing the core material from
a COTS screw (drill/cut -- possible with a brass screw?).

Any other options?

Look at bicycle caliper brake adjustment hardware.

Thread OD typically 0.225in - possibly an M5 or M6 thread.

That\'s an idea! I\'ve not owned a bike in years so can\'t recall
the details but I do recall their presence by the brake levers
(effectively altering the ratio of inner cable to outer sheath)

Tends to be Aluminum in the caliper adjustment, but longer and
brass in the presta valve. Tubes are easier to come by and are
regularly trashed, so maybe easier to get.

So, unlike the practice (as a kid) of *patching* a tube for reuse,
they are now considered \"disposable\"? (or, has some aspect changed
that makes patching impractical)

OK, so my neighbor (semi-professional rider who does these 100-mile
\"tours\") won\'t be \"put out\" by my asking him to save his next flat
for me? (or, canvas his friends for one)

I know he volunteers at a local non-profit that builds bikes for
underprivileged kids. Would those types of builds use tubes with
that valve? Or, would they still be Shrader? (i.e., how likely
would that group be as a source of a \"bad tube\"?)

Thanks!
 
W

whit3rd

Guest
On Tuesday, January 25, 2022 at 10:24:58 PM UTC-8, Don Y wrote:
I need ...a threaded tube (NOT
a pipe nipple). But, getting premade threaded tubing in that
range seems difficult.

If you can CAD the shape and pick a material from a list,
there\'s online shops that\'ll do the rest for ya.

<https://www.emachineshop.com/start/>

A threaded tube is just chuck a rod, drill on axis,
turn to diameter, thread, and part off, robotic lathes can do it quick and easy.
 
L

legg

Guest
On Fri, 28 Jan 2022 19:43:26 -0700, Don Y
<blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

On 1/28/2022 6:29 AM, legg wrote:
On Thu, 27 Jan 2022 06:29:31 -0700, Don Y
blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

On 1/26/2022 6:41 AM, legg wrote:
On Tue, 25 Jan 2022 23:24:34 -0700, Don Y
blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

I need a screw (a bit over 1/4\" thread diameter) with a hole
drilled longitudinally throughout its length. The hole as
large as feasible without significantly reducing the strength
to unusable (nebulous term) levels.

I realize I will eventually have to contract a casting or machined
parts.

But, am looking for onesy-twosy quantities to demo a prototype.

I thought I could approximate it using a threaded tube (NOT
a pipe nipple). But, getting premade threaded tubing in that
range seems difficult.

I thought of manually threading a (soft, brass?) pipe of
suitable ID/OD.

Also thought of having one *printed* -- but I\'m not sure getting
the threads right would be practical (driven by how fine the
layers are?). (I think most *plastics* would be too brittle
when torqued in such an application so I\'d have to print in
metal)

I also thought of physically removing the core material from
a COTS screw (drill/cut -- possible with a brass screw?).

Any other options?

Look at bicycle caliper brake adjustment hardware.

Thread OD typically 0.225in - possibly an M5 or M6 thread.

That\'s an idea! I\'ve not owned a bike in years so can\'t recall
the details but I do recall their presence by the brake levers
(effectively altering the ratio of inner cable to outer sheath)

Tends to be Aluminum in the caliper adjustment, but longer and
brass in the presta valve. Tubes are easier to come by and are
regularly trashed, so maybe easier to get.

So, unlike the practice (as a kid) of *patching* a tube for reuse,
they are now considered \"disposable\"? (or, has some aspect changed
that makes patching impractical)

OK, so my neighbor (semi-professional rider who does these 100-mile
\"tours\") won\'t be \"put out\" by my asking him to save his next flat
for me? (or, canvas his friends for one)

I know he volunteers at a local non-profit that builds bikes for
underprivileged kids. Would those types of builds use tubes with
that valve? Or, would they still be Shrader? (i.e., how likely
would that group be as a source of a \"bad tube\"?)

Thanks!

Real bike nuts use some kind of strange tubeless concoction.

Your local bike or sports store will stock tubes with either
presta or schraeder valves. Schraeders aren\'t any use to you.

If they\'ve got a repair department they\'ll likely have a handfull
of old tubes in their garbage. New tubes can be had for <$5.

I carry patched spares in my bike tool kit, because repairs on
the road are quicker that way, and patching works better in
a dry, well-lit and heated environment.

RL
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 1/29/2022 9:04 AM, legg wrote:
On Fri, 28 Jan 2022 19:43:26 -0700, Don Y
blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

On 1/28/2022 6:29 AM, legg wrote:
On Thu, 27 Jan 2022 06:29:31 -0700, Don Y
blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

On 1/26/2022 6:41 AM, legg wrote:
On Tue, 25 Jan 2022 23:24:34 -0700, Don Y
blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

I need a screw (a bit over 1/4\" thread diameter) with a hole
drilled longitudinally throughout its length. The hole as
large as feasible without significantly reducing the strength
to unusable (nebulous term) levels.

I realize I will eventually have to contract a casting or machined
parts.

But, am looking for onesy-twosy quantities to demo a prototype.

I thought I could approximate it using a threaded tube (NOT
a pipe nipple). But, getting premade threaded tubing in that
range seems difficult.

I thought of manually threading a (soft, brass?) pipe of
suitable ID/OD.

Also thought of having one *printed* -- but I\'m not sure getting
the threads right would be practical (driven by how fine the
layers are?). (I think most *plastics* would be too brittle
when torqued in such an application so I\'d have to print in
metal)

I also thought of physically removing the core material from
a COTS screw (drill/cut -- possible with a brass screw?).

Any other options?

Look at bicycle caliper brake adjustment hardware.

Thread OD typically 0.225in - possibly an M5 or M6 thread.

That\'s an idea! I\'ve not owned a bike in years so can\'t recall
the details but I do recall their presence by the brake levers
(effectively altering the ratio of inner cable to outer sheath)

Tends to be Aluminum in the caliper adjustment, but longer and
brass in the presta valve. Tubes are easier to come by and are
regularly trashed, so maybe easier to get.

So, unlike the practice (as a kid) of *patching* a tube for reuse,
they are now considered \"disposable\"? (or, has some aspect changed
that makes patching impractical)

OK, so my neighbor (semi-professional rider who does these 100-mile
\"tours\") won\'t be \"put out\" by my asking him to save his next flat
for me? (or, canvas his friends for one)

I know he volunteers at a local non-profit that builds bikes for
underprivileged kids. Would those types of builds use tubes with
that valve? Or, would they still be Shrader? (i.e., how likely
would that group be as a source of a \"bad tube\"?)

Thanks!

Real bike nuts use some kind of strange tubeless concoction.

Your local bike or sports store will stock tubes with either
presta or schraeder valves. Schraeders aren\'t any use to you.

If they\'ve got a repair department they\'ll likely have a handfull
of old tubes in their garbage. New tubes can be had for <$5.

I\'d rather find a \"waste\" tube that I can cannabilize and replace it
with a new tube -- than buy a new tube just to cut it up! That\'s
why the question re: the sorts of tubes the charity would likely
be using (needing).

I carry patched spares in my bike tool kit, because repairs on
the road are quicker that way, and patching works better in
a dry, well-lit and heated environment.

No doubt! Not to mention the lack of urgency that it affords.

I don\'t think I ever was far enough from \"home\", with a flat, that it
was an issue. But, my longest rides were ~50 mi (25 out and 25 back)
and, in a pinch, I could always phone for a lift home (as a teenager).

Folks routinely ride up/down the mountain, here (\"training\") and I
pity them if they had an incident; there\'s NOTHING along the way
and you\'re dealing with 55MPH traffic at the same time with hardly
a shoulder to rely on (one side is rock face, the other is cliff)

It seems like bike riding was less risky when I was younger...
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 1/28/2022 11:45 PM, whit3rd wrote:
On Tuesday, January 25, 2022 at 10:24:58 PM UTC-8, Don Y wrote:
I need ...a threaded tube (NOT
a pipe nipple). But, getting premade threaded tubing in that
range seems difficult.

If you can CAD the shape and pick a material from a list,
there\'s online shops that\'ll do the rest for ya.

https://www.emachineshop.com/start/

A threaded tube is just chuck a rod, drill on axis,
turn to diameter, thread, and part off, robotic lathes can do it quick and easy.

The \"free/exposed end\" will require more treatment. (there are several
different \"profiles\" required -- but, these only affect the exposed
portion of the fastener)

My current plan is to accumulate COTS samples of parts and evaluate them
as to strength, deformation, etc. (it\'s one thing to have a number that
alleges to represent the torque limits of a design -- another thing to
actually subject that to the torque from your hand/tool/etc. and observe
the results). From that, settle on a wall thickness and fine-tune the
profiles (e.g., to make them \"less encouraging\" to folks who may be tempted
to \"unfasten\" them)

[BTW, the \"drive rivets\" that I found at the local hardware require far
too much force to deform. That force would be carried through to the
rest of the unit. A *pop* rivet localizes the force between the
rivet and the tool so there is no risk of damage to the rest of the
device as the rivet is deformed.]

Then, research manufacturing tolerances for the different materials/markets
involved and try to find a \"common denominator\" that allows one set of
drawings to address the different designs.
 
L

legg

Guest
On Sun, 30 Jan 2022 00:08:54 -0700, Don Y
<blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

<snip>
I know he volunteers at a local non-profit that builds bikes for
underprivileged kids. Would those types of builds use tubes with
that valve? Or, would they still be Shrader? (i.e., how likely
would that group be as a source of a \"bad tube\"?)

Thanks!

Real bike nuts use some kind of strange tubeless concoction.

Your local bike or sports store will stock tubes with either
presta or schraeder valves. Schraeders aren\'t any use to you.

If they\'ve got a repair department they\'ll likely have a handfull
of old tubes in their garbage. New tubes can be had for <$5.

I\'d rather find a \"waste\" tube that I can cannabilize and replace it
with a new tube -- than buy a new tube just to cut it up! That\'s
why the question re: the sorts of tubes the charity would likely
be using (needing).

I carry patched spares in my bike tool kit, because repairs on
the road are quicker that way, and patching works better in
a dry, well-lit and heated environment.

No doubt! Not to mention the lack of urgency that it affords.

I don\'t think I ever was far enough from \"home\", with a flat, that it
was an issue. But, my longest rides were ~50 mi (25 out and 25 back)
and, in a pinch, I could always phone for a lift home (as a teenager).

Folks routinely ride up/down the mountain, here (\"training\") and I
pity them if they had an incident; there\'s NOTHING along the way
and you\'re dealing with 55MPH traffic at the same time with hardly
a shoulder to rely on (one side is rock face, the other is cliff)

It seems like bike riding was less risky when I was younger...

It probably seems that way when you\'re younger and are unaware
of the hazards, but higher density traffic does require common
sense and defensive driving/riding techniques. Oldsters don\'t
ride bikes the same way that youngsters do.

I ride for transportation, so a 10 minute delay for a tube changeout
has to be budgeted in a sensibly less-than-45-minute commute
(this being a consideration before negotiating a job or accomodation).
We get snow here, so there are days when the weather sensibly calls
for shanks mare or public transit (where available). You should know
that the road surface is stable along your route - makes lane sharing
with 6 ton behemoths more practical.

I maintain two bikes - one with 32C Schraeder-valve tires that never
go flat and a fancier spare with 24C presta-valve tires that go flat
if you look at them the wrong way.

If you don\'t remove a holed tube quickly, it can be rendered
unpatchable - a practice that produces a lot of trashed tubes.
Bike repair guys also will replace rather than repair a leaking
tube - its an FRU that\'s cheaper to replace than to troubleshoot,
as with a lot of things these days.

RL
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 1/30/2022 9:44 AM, legg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Jan 2022 00:08:54 -0700, Don Y

I don\'t think I ever was far enough from \"home\", with a flat, that it
was an issue. But, my longest rides were ~50 mi (25 out and 25 back)
and, in a pinch, I could always phone for a lift home (as a teenager).

Folks routinely ride up/down the mountain, here (\"training\") and I
pity them if they had an incident; there\'s NOTHING along the way
and you\'re dealing with 55MPH traffic at the same time with hardly
a shoulder to rely on (one side is rock face, the other is cliff)

It seems like bike riding was less risky when I was younger...

It probably seems that way when you\'re younger and are unaware
of the hazards, but higher density traffic does require common
sense and defensive driving/riding techniques. Oldsters don\'t
ride bikes the same way that youngsters do.

Most (all?) of my bike-riding happened before I went off to
school as I wasn\'t old enough to drive. Yet, still needed
to get myself to the various \"gifted student\" programs in
which I was enrolled (hence the 25 miles each way) on weekends
and summer days -- both times when my folks were unavailable to
schlep me around!

Back then, a \"highway\" was two lanes (one each direction) with
a generous shoulder. And, traffic volume was lighter.

And, I could exploit back roads to avoid the majority of traffic
(save for a few stretches) or exploit the topography.

Here, OTOH, the road onto which my subdivision empties is 6 lanes
and has a posted speed limit of 45MPH -- which means 55MPH is the
nominal rate of travel (for motor vehicles).

[The speed limit in town is 45 for most roads; 25 in \"neighborhoods\"]

On a two-lane road, you can sit on the right shoulder and still
manage to make a left across traffic.

On a 6-lane road -- with two more lanes for turns -- you really
have to be in the left lane in order to turn left. And, once
you\'ve navigated the turn, you now find yourself in the left lane
trying to get back over to the right shoulder! :<

[We have a fair number of bicyclists, pedestrians, etc. involved
in accidents because of the mismatch between motor vehicle operators
and these \"burdened\" forms of travel]

I ride for transportation, so a 10 minute delay for a tube changeout
has to be budgeted in a sensibly less-than-45-minute commute
(this being a consideration before negotiating a job or accomodation).

As was the case for me. But, I was going to *class* so there\'s not
as much downside to being delayed as there would be with an
employer.

We get snow here, so there are days when the weather sensibly calls
for shanks mare or public transit (where available). You should know
that the road surface is stable along your route - makes lane sharing
with 6 ton behemoths more practical.

I recall my first discovery of the value of \"fenders\" the first time
traveling in inclement weather. Moral of story: wear a light jacket
if only to protect the back of your shirt! :<

I maintain two bikes - one with 32C Schraeder-valve tires that never
go flat and a fancier spare with 24C presta-valve tires that go flat
if you look at them the wrong way.

I will keep that in mind if I ever opt to purchase a bike. Though
I imagine my riding days are behind me (I walk to places that most
folks would ride for the value of the exercise -- most trips, here,
are < 4mi each way: library, post office, grocers, etc.)

If you don\'t remove a holed tube quickly, it can be rendered
unpatchable - a practice that produces a lot of trashed tubes.
Bike repair guys also will replace rather than repair a leaking
tube - its an FRU that\'s cheaper to replace than to troubleshoot,
as with a lot of things these days.

That was what I had suspected. As a kid, buying a replacement
was unheard of -- you fixed what you had! And, as it was impractical
to ride on a flat, you \"hoofed it\" when the tire gave up the ghost.
 
M

Mikko OH2HVJ

Guest
Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> writes:
On 1/26/2022 1:44 AM, Mikko OH2HVJ wrote:
with a drill press by fixing the screw to the chuck and having the drill
bit stationary. Drill a starting hole with larger drill and through with
a smaller one(s).

Why wouldn\'t I thread the screw into a tapped block (to support and
reinforce the threads -- as well as act as a heat sink) -- after coating
it with antiseize (as the drill bit\'s rotation will tend to want
to tighten the screw in the block, possibly making removal more
difficult)?

Centering is way easier that way. If you want to have any larger hole,
you\'ll damage the threads with non-centered hole.

And, I\'d assume move from smaller diameter bits up through larger ones
to minimize the amount of material being removed with each.

Nope, make a small starting indent first with an oversize drill. A
center drill would be the correct tool, but I assumed you would not have
that (nor lathe).

--
mikko
 

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