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OT: What's a good house paint for hot climates?

J

Joerg

Guest
Hi Folks,

Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a lot.
Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back then.
First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now
some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense sun.

Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and Benjamin
Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly Moore
would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best. I
think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer sun.
Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.

Any opinions? What say thee?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 
J

Joerg

Guest
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 4:34:49 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Hi Folks,



Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a lot.

Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back then.

First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now

some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense sun.



Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and Benjamin

Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly Moore

would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best. I

think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer sun.

Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.



Any opinions? What say thee?

Well wathcha painting? Wood, stucco, concrete, brick, synthetic siding?
Oops, sorry, wood siding. But it wouldn't matter much because there is
already the Elastocote and the old Kelly Moore paint underneath, which
even with serious power-washing effort won't come off.

So in essence we'd be painting paint :)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 

Guest
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 4:34:49 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Hi Folks,



Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a lot.

Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back then.

First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now

some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense sun.



Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and Benjamin

Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly Moore

would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best. I

think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer sun.

Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.



Any opinions? What say thee?
Well wathcha painting? Wood, stucco, concrete, brick, synthetic siding?
 
J

Joerg

Guest
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 5:03:41 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 4:34:49 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Hi Folks, Time to paint the house again but the local brands
have changed a lot. Last time was around 14 years ago, and we
used Kelly Moore back then. First their Elastocote and then
Latex paint. It held up good but now some areas suddenly turned
bright white, I guess from the intense sun. Nowadays the
locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and Benjamin
Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot.
Kelly Moore would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is
still the best. I think the toughest enemy for paint on our
house is the hot summer sun. Not so much the rain because of
the rather large roof overhang. Any opinions? What say thee?
Well wathcha painting? Wood, stucco, concrete, brick, synthetic
siding?




Oops, sorry, wood siding. But it wouldn't matter much because there
is

already the Elastocote and the old Kelly Moore paint underneath,
which

even with serious power-washing effort won't come off.



So in essence we'd be painting paint :)


Sherwin-Williams always works as advertized and it's priced slightly
less than Benjamin Moore. They always sell it for less than the list
price, will probably let that $55/gal Duration go for $35. I've seen
the Behr self-priming in action and am less than impressed with it,
you will end up using twice as much and it still looks bad. Actually
wouldn't trust any claims of self-priming and prime it anyway
whichever paint you use, depends on your standards.I'm pretty sure
S-W is the product of choice of the big contractors, they have every
imaginable application of paint covered.
We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the house. It's
not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached.

Our paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more
concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer than the
14 years the Kelly Moore lasted.

Meantime, the paints my wife found rated as good:

Pittsburgh Manor Hall Timeless
Pittsburgh Sunproof Latex Exterior
Benjamin Moor Aura Waterborne Exterior

But maybe S-W is the way to go and some web links corroborate what you said:

http://www.consumersearch.com/exterior-paint/sherwin-williams-duration

The only thing I don't like is that it's a self-prime thick paint. We
don't need to prime.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 
J

Joerg

Guest
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
[...]


Sherwin-Williams always works as advertized and it's priced slightly
less than Benjamin Moore. They always sell it for less than the list
price, will probably let that $55/gal Duration go for $35. I've seen
the Behr self-priming in action and am less than impressed with it,
you will end up using twice as much and it still looks bad. Actually
wouldn't trust any claims of self-priming and prime it anyway
whichever paint you use, depends on your standards.I'm pretty sure
S-W is the product of choice of the big contractors, they have every
imaginable application of paint covered.




We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the house. It's

not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached.



Our paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more

concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer than the

14 years the Kelly Moore lasted.



Meantime, the paints my wife found rated as good:



Pittsburgh Manor Hall Timeless

Pittsburgh Sunproof Latex Exterior

Benjamin Moor Aura Waterborne Exterior



But maybe S-W is the way to go and some web links corroborate what you said:



http://www.consumersearch.com/exterior-paint/sherwin-williams-duration



The only thing I don't like is that it's a self-prime thick paint. We

don't need to prime.



--

Regards, Joerg



http://www.analogconsultants.com/

The Pittsburgh products look good, but I never see them come up in reviews.
I haven't either. Meantime I've scoped out S-W Duration a bit and there
seem to be some issues with it, mostly because of its thickness and
quick drying time:

http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/10/duration-exterior.html

We normally use a roller but this paint doesn't seem to like that
technique. Our siding has these typical vertical recesses that must be
painted by brush and then the other person rolls the surfaces. Afraid
that S-W Duration might be clumping a lot when the roller meets the
brush-painted areas.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 

Guest
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 5:03:41 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 4:34:49 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

Hi Folks,







Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a lot.



Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back then.



First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now



some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense sun.







Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and Benjamin



Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly Moore



would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best. I



think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer sun.



Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.







Any opinions? What say thee?



Well wathcha painting? Wood, stucco, concrete, brick, synthetic siding?





Oops, sorry, wood siding. But it wouldn't matter much because there is

already the Elastocote and the old Kelly Moore paint underneath, which

even with serious power-washing effort won't come off.



So in essence we'd be painting paint :)
Sherwin-Williams always works as advertized and it's priced slightly less than Benjamin Moore. They always sell it for less than the list price, will probably let that $55/gal Duration go for $35. I've seen the Behr self-priming in action and am less than impressed with it, you will end up using twice as much and it still looks bad. Actually wouldn't trust any claims of self-priming and prime it anyway whichever paint you use, depends on your standards.I'm pretty sure S-W is the product of choice of the big contractors, they have every imaginable application of paint covered.
 
N

Nico Coesel

Guest
Joerg <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 5:03:41 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
imaginable application of paint covered.


We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the house. It's
not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached.
I'd still give it a very thourough sanding to remove the layer that
got affected by the sun.

Our paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more
concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer than the
14 years the Kelly Moore lasted.
14 years is very long. Over here the recommendation is to paint every
8 years if you use very good paint.

--
Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
indicates you are not using the right tools...
nico@nctdevpuntnl (punt=.)
--------------------------------------------------------------
 
J

Joerg

Guest
Nico Coesel wrote:
Joerg <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 5:03:41 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
imaginable application of paint covered.

We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the house. It's
not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached.

I'd still give it a very thourough sanding to remove the layer that
got affected by the sun.
That would take many weeks. The previous paint is very tough to get off.
We'll pressure-wash it though.


Our paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more
concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer than the
14 years the Kelly Moore lasted.

14 years is very long. Over here the recommendation is to paint every
8 years if you use very good paint.
In Germany houses weren't painted that often and that's only a few
hundred km from you. Maybe after 20 years or so. But over there I knew
what the good stuff was, paints such as ICI Dulux.

However, in Europe the concern was mostly with harsh weather and cold
winters. What ruins a paint here is the blistering sun. Walls can get so
hot that you can't touch them and then there is the strong UV.

It's amazing. A spot next to the garage has turned from beige to bright
white. When we still had linoleum in our kitchen the sun turned a chunk
of that from grey to purple. Through the window glass! I think if you
leave an EPROM oustide with the glass bare the data content is pretty
much gone an hour later.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 

Guest
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 5:03:41 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:



On Sunday, March 24, 2013 4:34:49 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

Hi Folks, Time to paint the house again but the local brands

have changed a lot. Last time was around 14 years ago, and we

used Kelly Moore back then. First their Elastocote and then

Latex paint. It held up good but now some areas suddenly turned

bright white, I guess from the intense sun. Nowadays the

locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and Benjamin

Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot.

Kelly Moore would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is

still the best. I think the toughest enemy for paint on our

house is the hot summer sun. Not so much the rain because of

the rather large roof overhang. Any opinions? What say thee?

Well wathcha painting? Wood, stucco, concrete, brick, synthetic

siding?









Oops, sorry, wood siding. But it wouldn't matter much because there

is



already the Elastocote and the old Kelly Moore paint underneath,

which



even with serious power-washing effort won't come off.







So in essence we'd be painting paint :)





Sherwin-Williams always works as advertized and it's priced slightly

less than Benjamin Moore. They always sell it for less than the list

price, will probably let that $55/gal Duration go for $35. I've seen

the Behr self-priming in action and am less than impressed with it,

you will end up using twice as much and it still looks bad. Actually

wouldn't trust any claims of self-priming and prime it anyway

whichever paint you use, depends on your standards.I'm pretty sure

S-W is the product of choice of the big contractors, they have every

imaginable application of paint covered.





We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the house. It's

not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached.



Our paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more

concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer than the

14 years the Kelly Moore lasted.



Meantime, the paints my wife found rated as good:



Pittsburgh Manor Hall Timeless

Pittsburgh Sunproof Latex Exterior

Benjamin Moor Aura Waterborne Exterior



But maybe S-W is the way to go and some web links corroborate what you said:



http://www.consumersearch.com/exterior-paint/sherwin-williams-duration



The only thing I don't like is that it's a self-prime thick paint. We

don't need to prime.



--

Regards, Joerg



http://www.analogconsultants.com/
The Pittsburgh products look good, but I never see them come up in reviews.
 
J

Joerg

Guest
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:48:30 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:


[...]





Sherwin-Williams always works as advertized and it's priced
slightly less than Benjamin Moore. They always sell it for
less than the list price, will probably let that $55/gal
Duration go for $35. I've seen the Behr self-priming in
action and am less than impressed with it, you will end up
using twice as much and it still looks bad. Actually wouldn't
trust any claims of self-priming and prime it anyway
whichever paint you use, depends on your standards.I'm pretty
sure S-W is the product of choice of the big contractors,
they have every imaginable application of paint covered.
We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the
house. It's not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached. Our
paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more
concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer
than the 14 years the Kelly Moore lasted. Meantime, the paints
my wife found rated as good: Pittsburgh Manor Hall Timeless
Pittsburgh Sunproof Latex Exterior Benjamin Moor Aura
Waterborne Exterior But maybe S-W is the way to go and some web
links corroborate what you said:
http://www.consumersearch.com/exterior-paint/sherwin-williams-duration
The only thing I don't like is that it's a self-prime thick
paint. We don't need to prime. -- Regards, Joerg
http://www.analogconsultants.com/
The Pittsburgh products look good, but I never see them come up
in reviews.




I haven't either. Meantime I've scoped out S-W Duration a bit and
there

seem to be some issues with it, mostly because of its thickness and


quick drying time:



http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/10/duration-exterior.html



We normally use a roller but this paint doesn't seem to like that

technique. Our siding has these typical vertical recesses that must
be

painted by brush and then the other person rolls the surfaces.
Afraid

that S-W Duration might be clumping a lot when the roller meets the


brush-painted areas.



--

Regards, Joerg



http://www.analogconsultants.com/

I don't trust that review. I've used their interior Superpaint which
had the same complaints, it's not that thick and it's easy to apply,
but it does set up fast, so you don't want to go over anything that's
been in place for more than a few minutes, you need to let it
completely dry first. Your siding just means you cut-in all the
recessed grooves on the first day and hit the flats on the second.
It's not the only review like that I saw. But for the Pittsburgh
Sunproof I can't find any such detailed reviews.

Doing the recesses one day and the rest the next day is fine, as long as
the Duration exterior paint can be rolled.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 

Guest
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:48:30 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:



[...]





Sherwin-Williams always works as advertized and it's priced slightly

less than Benjamin Moore. They always sell it for less than the list

price, will probably let that $55/gal Duration go for $35. I've seen

the Behr self-priming in action and am less than impressed with it,

you will end up using twice as much and it still looks bad. Actually

wouldn't trust any claims of self-priming and prime it anyway

whichever paint you use, depends on your standards.I'm pretty sure

S-W is the product of choice of the big contractors, they have every

imaginable application of paint covered.









We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the house. It's



not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached.







Our paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more



concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer than the



14 years the Kelly Moore lasted.







Meantime, the paints my wife found rated as good:







Pittsburgh Manor Hall Timeless



Pittsburgh Sunproof Latex Exterior



Benjamin Moor Aura Waterborne Exterior







But maybe S-W is the way to go and some web links corroborate what you said:







http://www.consumersearch.com/exterior-paint/sherwin-williams-duration







The only thing I don't like is that it's a self-prime thick paint. We



don't need to prime.







--



Regards, Joerg







http://www.analogconsultants.com/



The Pittsburgh products look good, but I never see them come up in reviews.





I haven't either. Meantime I've scoped out S-W Duration a bit and there

seem to be some issues with it, mostly because of its thickness and

quick drying time:



http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/10/duration-exterior.html



We normally use a roller but this paint doesn't seem to like that

technique. Our siding has these typical vertical recesses that must be

painted by brush and then the other person rolls the surfaces. Afraid

that S-W Duration might be clumping a lot when the roller meets the

brush-painted areas.



--

Regards, Joerg



http://www.analogconsultants.com/
I don't trust that review. I've used their interior Superpaint which had the same complaints, it's not that thick and it's easy to apply, but it does set up fast, so you don't want to go over anything that's been in place for more than a few minutes, you need to let it completely dry first. Your siding just means you cut-in all the recessed grooves on the first day and hit the flats on the second.
 

Guest
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 8:21:00 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:48:30 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:



On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:





[...]











Sherwin-Williams always works as advertized and it's priced

slightly less than Benjamin Moore. They always sell it for

less than the list price, will probably let that $55/gal

Duration go for $35. I've seen the Behr self-priming in

action and am less than impressed with it, you will end up

using twice as much and it still looks bad. Actually wouldn't

trust any claims of self-priming and prime it anyway

whichever paint you use, depends on your standards.I'm pretty

sure S-W is the product of choice of the big contractors,

they have every imaginable application of paint covered.

We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the

house. It's not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached. Our

paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more

concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer

than the 14 years the Kelly Moore lasted. Meantime, the paints

my wife found rated as good: Pittsburgh Manor Hall Timeless

Pittsburgh Sunproof Latex Exterior Benjamin Moor Aura

Waterborne Exterior But maybe S-W is the way to go and some web

links corroborate what you said:

http://www.consumersearch.com/exterior-paint/sherwin-williams-duration

The only thing I don't like is that it's a self-prime thick

paint. We don't need to prime. -- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

The Pittsburgh products look good, but I never see them come up

in reviews.









I haven't either. Meantime I've scoped out S-W Duration a bit and

there



seem to be some issues with it, mostly because of its thickness and





quick drying time:







http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/10/duration-exterior.html







We normally use a roller but this paint doesn't seem to like that



technique. Our siding has these typical vertical recesses that must

be



painted by brush and then the other person rolls the surfaces.

Afraid



that S-W Duration might be clumping a lot when the roller meets the





brush-painted areas.







--



Regards, Joerg







http://www.analogconsultants.com/



I don't trust that review. I've used their interior Superpaint which

had the same complaints, it's not that thick and it's easy to apply,

but it does set up fast, so you don't want to go over anything that's

been in place for more than a few minutes, you need to let it

completely dry first. Your siding just means you cut-in all the

recessed grooves on the first day and hit the flats on the second.





It's not the only review like that I saw. But for the Pittsburgh

Sunproof I can't find any such detailed reviews.



Doing the recesses one day and the rest the next day is fine, as long as

the Duration exterior paint can be rolled.

LOL- those people are exaggerating about it being like mayonnaise. You need to ask yourself how a leading paint manufacturer would make a paint that's tough to roll? The answer is they don't, if it's anything like the Superpaint, it will roll well. As for the prep, you need to get some of those little blocks of 60-grit sanders, they look like sponges, to dull and roughen the surface of the existing paint, it takes only slightly more effort than wiping the walls down with a rag. Check the S-W site about surface prep, if it's hard and smooth the adhesion will not be the best.
 

Guest
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 8:21:00 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

Doing the recesses one day and the rest the next day is fine, as long as

the Duration exterior paint can be rolled.
When you're cutting in the recesses on the first day, you need to feather it off like the finished job. When you get the inevitable drops on the flats below, you need to feather them out, same thing with any excess squeezed out next to the recesses, because those drops and ridges will be there to stay when it dries, and your second coat on the flats is not going to dissolve them :)
 
M

Martin Riddle

Guest
"Joerg" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
news:ar96bkF3uqsU1@mid.individual.net...
Hi Folks,

Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a lot.
Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back then.
First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now
some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense sun.

Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and
Benjamin
Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly Moore
would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best. I
think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer sun.
Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.

Any opinions? What say thee?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
For Latex, Glidden Endurance
<http://www.glidden.com/products/endurance-exterior-paint-flat.do>

I painted our eves with this and found out that the big box stores don't
carry it. You have to find a Glidden retailer, usually a little hardware
store that is approved by Glidden to sell it. I found out it is a
popular paint used for the houses along the water front, it weathers
very well.

Also get a semi gloss, there are more Akyds in the gloss versions which
make for a harder surface that will be more weather resistant. You can
always do a final coat in satin to cover the shine, wooden floors are
sometimes done this way.

Cheers
 
J

Joerg

Guest
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 8:21:00 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:48:30 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
[...]
Sherwin-Williams always works as advertized and it's
priced slightly less than Benjamin Moore. They always
sell it for less than the list price, will probably let
that $55/gal Duration go for $35. I've seen the Behr
self-priming in action and am less than impressed with
it, you will end up using twice as much and it still
looks bad. Actually wouldn't trust any claims of
self-priming and prime it anyway whichever paint you use,
depends on your standards.I'm pretty sure S-W is the
product of choice of the big contractors, they have every
imaginable application of paint covered.
We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the
house. It's not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached. Our
paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am
more concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit
longer than the 14 years the Kelly Moore lasted. Meantime,
the paints my wife found rated as good: Pittsburgh Manor
Hall Timeless Pittsburgh Sunproof Latex Exterior Benjamin
Moor Aura Waterborne Exterior But maybe S-W is the way to
go and some web links corroborate what you said:
http://www.consumersearch.com/exterior-paint/sherwin-williams-duration
The only thing I don't like is that it's a self-prime
thick paint. We don't need to prime. -- Regards, Joerg
http://www.analogconsultants.com/
The Pittsburgh products look good, but I never see them come
up in reviews.
I haven't either. Meantime I've scoped out S-W Duration a bit
and there seem to be some issues with it, mostly because of its
thickness and quick drying time:
http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/10/duration-exterior.html We
normally use a roller but this paint doesn't seem to like that
technique. Our siding has these typical vertical recesses that
must be painted by brush and then the other person rolls the
surfaces. Afraid that S-W Duration might be clumping a lot when
the roller meets the brush-painted areas. -- Regards, Joerg
http://www.analogconsultants.com/
I don't trust that review. I've used their interior Superpaint
which had the same complaints, it's not that thick and it's easy
to apply, but it does set up fast, so you don't want to go over
anything that's been in place for more than a few minutes, you
need to let it completely dry first. Your siding just means you
cut-in all the recessed grooves on the first day and hit the
flats on the second.




It's not the only review like that I saw. But for the Pittsburgh

Sunproof I can't find any such detailed reviews.



Doing the recesses one day and the rest the next day is fine, as
long as

the Duration exterior paint can be rolled.

LOL- those people are exaggerating about it being like mayonnaise.
Well, most are folks who professionally paint since decades. They must
know a thing or two.


You need to ask yourself how a leading paint manufacturer would make
a paint that's tough to roll? The answer is they don't, if it's
anything like the Superpaint, it will roll well. As for the prep, you
need to get some of those little blocks of 60-grit sanders, they look
like sponges, to dull and roughen the surface of the existing paint,
it takes only slightly more effort than wiping the walls down with a
rag. Check the S-W site about surface prep, if it's hard and smooth
the adhesion will not be the best.
Yep, got those pads in the garage already.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 
J

Joerg

Guest
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 8:21:00 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

Doing the recesses one day and the rest the next day is fine, as
long as

the Duration exterior paint can be rolled.


When you're cutting in the recesses on the first day, you need to
feather it off like the finished job. When you get the inevitable
drops on the flats below, you need to feather them out, same thing
with any excess squeezed out next to the recesses, because those
drops and ridges will be there to stay when it dries, and your second
coat on the flats is not going to dissolve them :)
Good point. Got to do a clean job in that first step. And I don't want
to be sanding down ridges.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 
J

Joerg

Guest
Martin Riddle wrote:
"Joerg" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
news:ar96bkF3uqsU1@mid.individual.net...
Hi Folks,

Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a lot.
Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back then.
First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now
some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense sun.

Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and
Benjamin
Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly Moore
would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best. I
think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer sun.
Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.

Any opinions? What say thee?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

For Latex, Glidden Endurance
http://www.glidden.com/products/endurance-exterior-paint-flat.do

I painted our eves with this and found out that the big box stores don't
carry it. You have to find a Glidden retailer, usually a little hardware
store that is approved by Glidden to sell it. I found out it is a
popular paint used for the houses along the water front, it weathers
very well.
Do you know how that holds up in the blistering sun? Weather isn't a
concern here but heat and UV is.


Also get a semi gloss, there are more Akyds in the gloss versions which
make for a harder surface that will be more weather resistant. You can
always do a final coat in satin to cover the shine, wooden floors are
sometimes done this way.
So far we've always used semi-gloss. It also washes better. Occasionally
we have those turkey vultures and other birds who seem to have no qualms
about "letting go" during final approach. Pretty gross.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 
C

Charlie E.

Guest
On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 17:14:59 -0700 (PDT),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:48:30 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:



I haven't either. Meantime I've scoped out S-W Duration a bit and there

seem to be some issues with it, mostly because of its thickness and

quick drying time:



http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/10/duration-exterior.html



We normally use a roller but this paint doesn't seem to like that

technique. Our siding has these typical vertical recesses that must be

painted by brush and then the other person rolls the surfaces. Afraid

that S-W Duration might be clumping a lot when the roller meets the

brush-painted areas.



--

Regards, Joerg



http://www.analogconsultants.com/

I don't trust that review. I've used their interior Superpaint which had the same complaints, it's not that thick and it's easy to apply, but it does set up fast, so you don't want to go over anything that's been in place for more than a few minutes, you need to let it completely dry first. Your siding just means you cut-in all the recessed grooves on the first day and hit the flats on the second.
Or, just use a sprayer. We bought one a few years back, and makes a
lot of jobs a lot easier, just noisier!

Charlie
 
J

Joerg

Guest
Charlie E. wrote:
On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 17:14:59 -0700 (PDT),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:48:30 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:


I haven't either. Meantime I've scoped out S-W Duration a bit and there

seem to be some issues with it, mostly because of its thickness and

quick drying time:



http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/10/duration-exterior.html



We normally use a roller but this paint doesn't seem to like that

technique. Our siding has these typical vertical recesses that must be

painted by brush and then the other person rolls the surfaces. Afraid

that S-W Duration might be clumping a lot when the roller meets the

brush-painted areas.



--

Regards, Joerg



http://www.analogconsultants.com/
I don't trust that review. I've used their interior Superpaint which had the same complaints, it's not that thick and it's easy to apply, but it does set up fast, so you don't want to go over anything that's been in place for more than a few minutes, you need to let it completely dry first. Your siding just means you cut-in all the recessed grooves on the first day and hit the flats on the second.

Or, just use a sprayer. We bought one a few years back, and makes a
lot of jobs a lot easier, just noisier!
I tried with a li'l Wagner 15 year ago. What a mess. The results were
good but with thicker paint it plugged up a lot. Plus all the masking
and taping makes that job not so much faster than rolling. And if a
major wind comes up you have to stop so that no spray wafts over to the
neighbors.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 
R

Robert Macy

Guest
On Mar 24, 1:34 pm, Joerg <inva...@invalid.invalid> wrote:
Hi Folks,

Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a lot.
Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back then.
First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now
some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense sun.

Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and Benjamin
Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly Moore
would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best. I
think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer sun.
Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.

Any opinions? What say thee?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
you should post this question on
alt.home.repair usenet group

I did. The best, most knowledgeable answer came from 'nestork' who
really knew his chemistry, background etc.

I opted to use Behr from HD, simply due to availablility. Their
masonry and ?? paint is what someone else recommended. After one year
in the blazing Arizona sun and cold driving rains, haven't noticed any
shift in color. Nor, chalkiness I'm used to seeing.

One note, if you're near an airport; be prepared for that chalky look
coming on fast. I've heard that from planes dumping fuel on approach
really takes out your paint. From experience living near a major
airport, seemed true. Every house had chalky paint and even ours after
a coat of EXPENSIVE high quality started going the same way.
 
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