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S

server

Guest
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0

In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence.
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.

Just a bit up the coast is Mussel Rock. The San Andreas fault runs up
the middle of the peninsula (look for the string of subduction lakes)
and leaves land and goes out to sea between Mussel Rock and the beach.
It makes land again at Point Reyes.



--

Father Brown\'s figure remained quite dark and still;
but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was
always most valuable when he had lost it.
 
D

Dean Hoffman

Guest
On Saturday, December 4, 2021 at 5:50:44 PM UTC-6, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0

In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence.
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.

Just a bit up the coast is Mussel Rock. The San Andreas fault runs up
the middle of the peninsula (look for the string of subduction lakes)
and leaves land and goes out to sea between Mussel Rock and the beach.
It makes land again at Point Reyes.



--

Father Brown\'s figure remained quite dark and still;
but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was
always most valuable when he had lost it.
I remember driving on Highway 1 years ago. It\'s hard to imagine sailors in
old sailing ships crossing oceans. Those things were only 100 feet long or so
if I remember right.
 
T

Tom Gardner

Guest
On 05/12/21 02:55, Dean Hoffman wrote:
On Saturday, December 4, 2021 at 5:50:44 PM UTC-6, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0

In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence.
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.

Just a bit up the coast is Mussel Rock. The San Andreas fault runs up
the middle of the peninsula (look for the string of subduction lakes)
and leaves land and goes out to sea between Mussel Rock and the beach.
It makes land again at Point Reyes.



--

Father Brown\'s figure remained quite dark and still;
but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was
always most valuable when he had lost it.

I remember driving on Highway 1 years ago. It\'s hard to imagine sailors in
old sailing ships crossing oceans. Those things were only 100 feet long or so
if I remember right.
Smaller than that

I regularly see a replica of \"the ship that put North America
on the map\", John Cabot\'s caravel \"Matthew\", 1497.

Here\'s a picture so you can see the scale relative to a human
https://live.staticflickr.com/5143/5866078322_829ee5bde6_b.jpg

Length: 78ft / 24m
Cargo weight: 50 tons.

If you get the chance, it is well worth visiting a \"tall ship\"
such as a tea clipper. This 1928 short video is worth skipping
through to see what it meant to round Cape Horn. Not for the
fainthearted!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLzBDhilDL0
 
M

marty

Guest
On 5/12/21 21:45, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 05/12/21 02:55, Dean Hoffman wrote:
On Saturday, December 4, 2021 at 5:50:44 PM UTC-6,
jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0


In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence.
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.

Just a bit up the coast is Mussel Rock. The San Andreas fault runs up
the middle of the peninsula (look for the string of subduction lakes)
and leaves land and goes out to sea between Mussel Rock and the beach.
It makes land again at Point Reyes.



--

Father Brown\'s figure remained quite dark and still;
but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was
always most valuable when he had lost it.

       I remember driving on Highway 1 years ago.   It\'s hard to
imagine sailors in
old sailing ships crossing oceans.  Those things were only 100 feet
long or so
if I remember right.

Smaller than that

I regularly see a replica of \"the ship that put North America
on the map\", John Cabot\'s caravel \"Matthew\", 1497.

Here\'s a picture so you can see the scale relative to a human
https://live.staticflickr.com/5143/5866078322_829ee5bde6_b.jpg

Length: 78ft / 24m
Cargo weight: 50 tons.

If you get the chance, it is well worth visiting a \"tall ship\"
such as a tea clipper. This 1928 short video is worth skipping
through to see what it meant to round Cape Horn. Not for the
fainthearted!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLzBDhilDL0
Thanks for the caravel photo. Now I know what I am driving around in
civilization game.

--
Marty
 
D

Dean Hoffman

Guest
On Sunday, December 5, 2021 at 4:45:44 AM UTC-6, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 05/12/21 02:55, Dean Hoffman wrote:
On Saturday, December 4, 2021 at 5:50:44 PM UTC-6, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0

In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence.
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.

Just a bit up the coast is Mussel Rock. The San Andreas fault runs up
the middle of the peninsula (look for the string of subduction lakes)
and leaves land and goes out to sea between Mussel Rock and the beach.
It makes land again at Point Reyes.



--

Father Brown\'s figure remained quite dark and still;
but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was
always most valuable when he had lost it.

I remember driving on Highway 1 years ago. It\'s hard to imagine sailors in
old sailing ships crossing oceans. Those things were only 100 feet long or so
if I remember right.
Smaller than that

I regularly see a replica of \"the ship that put North America
on the map\", John Cabot\'s caravel \"Matthew\", 1497.

Here\'s a picture so you can see the scale relative to a human
https://live.staticflickr.com/5143/5866078322_829ee5bde6_b.jpg

Length: 78ft / 24m
Cargo weight: 50 tons.

If you get the chance, it is well worth visiting a \"tall ship\"
such as a tea clipper. This 1928 short video is worth skipping
through to see what it meant to round Cape Horn. Not for the
fainthearted!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLzBDhilDL0
Wow. The narrator is good. There\'s no substitute for being there. The part about the
ship\'s captain saving a couple of his guys by jumping overboard shows real bravery. Plus, he
was strong enough to pull one man out by the hair and with one hand.
 
M

Martin Brown

Guest
On 04/12/2021 23:50, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0

In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence.
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.
Even as a former Mancunian I find it hard to get excited about
Boddington\'s beer or their bees (which Manchester have adopted). The
other ones are mass market churned out of chemical plants.

http://manchesterbe.es/index.php/2018/03/18/the-boddington-bees/

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better representatives.
Just a bit up the coast is Mussel Rock. The San Andreas fault runs up
the middle of the peninsula (look for the string of subduction lakes)
and leaves land and goes out to sea between Mussel Rock and the beach.
It makes land again at Point Reyes.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
 
S

server

Guest
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 09:55:41 +0000, Martin Brown
<\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 04/12/2021 23:50, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0

In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence.
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.

Even as a former Mancunian I find it hard to get excited about
Boddington\'s beer or their bees (which Manchester have adopted). The
other ones are mass market churned out of chemical plants.

http://manchesterbe.es/index.php/2018/03/18/the-boddington-bees/

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better representatives.
We like the lighter, wheatier beers. The canned Bod is a bit muddy to
our taste, but the draft at Camelot was very different and really
tasty. They were out of Harp or we\'d have had one of those.

Sometimes the local versions of furrin\' beers are actually locally
brewed, subcontracted, so may not be the same as in the old country.
Sometimes the brewery changes and you can tell the difference.



--

Father Brown\'s figure remained quite dark and still;
but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was
always most valuable when he had lost it.
 
M

Martin Brown

Guest
On 06/12/2021 14:32, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 09:55:41 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 04/12/2021 23:50, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0

In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence.
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.

Even as a former Mancunian I find it hard to get excited about
Boddington\'s beer or their bees (which Manchester have adopted). The
other ones are mass market churned out of chemical plants.

http://manchesterbe.es/index.php/2018/03/18/the-boddington-bees/

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better representatives.

We like the lighter, wheatier beers. The canned Bod is a bit muddy to
our taste, but the draft at Camelot was very different and really
tasty. They were out of Harp or we\'d have had one of those.
In that case try and find Marston\'s Pedigree (it is available in cans
and bottles and a passable version of the real thing on draft).

https://www.marstonsbrewery.co.uk/beers/pedigree/
Sometimes the local versions of furrin\' beers are actually locally
brewed, subcontracted, so may not be the same as in the old country.
Sometimes the brewery changes and you can tell the difference.
My recollection of US beers is that they are typically served ice cold.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
 
S

server

Guest
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 15:15:24 +0000, Martin Brown
<\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/12/2021 14:32, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 09:55:41 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 04/12/2021 23:50, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0

In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence.
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.

Even as a former Mancunian I find it hard to get excited about
Boddington\'s beer or their bees (which Manchester have adopted). The
other ones are mass market churned out of chemical plants.

http://manchesterbe.es/index.php/2018/03/18/the-boddington-bees/

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better representatives.

We like the lighter, wheatier beers. The canned Bod is a bit muddy to
our taste, but the draft at Camelot was very different and really
tasty. They were out of Harp or we\'d have had one of those.

In that case try and find Marston\'s Pedigree (it is available in cans
and bottles and a passable version of the real thing on draft).

https://www.marstonsbrewery.co.uk/beers/pedigree/

Sometimes the local versions of furrin\' beers are actually locally
brewed, subcontracted, so may not be the same as in the old country.
Sometimes the brewery changes and you can tell the difference.

My recollection of US beers is that they are typically served ice cold.
Yes. If you don\'t like cold beer, wait a bit before you drink it.

Lately our house beer is Anchor Steam; the brewery is a short walk
from where we work. Nobody seems to know exactly what \"steam beer\"
means.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steam_beer#In_literature



--

Father Brown\'s figure remained quite dark and still;
but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was
always most valuable when he had lost it.
 
F

Fred Bloggs

Guest
On Sunday, December 5, 2021 at 5:45:44 AM UTC-5, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 05/12/21 02:55, Dean Hoffman wrote:
On Saturday, December 4, 2021 at 5:50:44 PM UTC-6, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0

In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence.
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.

Just a bit up the coast is Mussel Rock. The San Andreas fault runs up
the middle of the peninsula (look for the string of subduction lakes)
and leaves land and goes out to sea between Mussel Rock and the beach.
It makes land again at Point Reyes.



--

Father Brown\'s figure remained quite dark and still;
but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was
always most valuable when he had lost it.

I remember driving on Highway 1 years ago. It\'s hard to imagine sailors in
old sailing ships crossing oceans. Those things were only 100 feet long or so
if I remember right.
Smaller than that

I regularly see a replica of \"the ship that put North America
on the map\", John Cabot\'s caravel \"Matthew\", 1497.

Here\'s a picture so you can see the scale relative to a human
https://live.staticflickr.com/5143/5866078322_829ee5bde6_b.jpg

Length: 78ft / 24m
Cargo weight: 50 tons.

If you get the chance, it is well worth visiting a \"tall ship\"
such as a tea clipper. This 1928 short video is worth skipping
through to see what it meant to round Cape Horn. Not for the
fainthearted!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLzBDhilDL0
It\'s not John Cabot. His real name was Giovanni Caboto, and Italian navigator. I always read he was lost at sea during a storm on his return trip. Now they\'re saying he died in Venice.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cabot
 
T

Tom Gardner

Guest
On 06/12/21 15:24, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 15:15:24 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/12/2021 14:32, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 09:55:41 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 04/12/2021 23:50, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0

In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence.
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.

Even as a former Mancunian I find it hard to get excited about
Boddington\'s beer or their bees (which Manchester have adopted). The
other ones are mass market churned out of chemical plants.

http://manchesterbe.es/index.php/2018/03/18/the-boddington-bees/

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better representatives.

We like the lighter, wheatier beers. The canned Bod is a bit muddy to
our taste, but the draft at Camelot was very different and really
tasty. They were out of Harp or we\'d have had one of those.

In that case try and find Marston\'s Pedigree (it is available in cans
and bottles and a passable version of the real thing on draft).

https://www.marstonsbrewery.co.uk/beers/pedigree/

Sometimes the local versions of furrin\' beers are actually locally
brewed, subcontracted, so may not be the same as in the old country.
Sometimes the brewery changes and you can tell the difference.

My recollection of US beers is that they are typically served ice cold.

Yes. If you don\'t like cold beer, wait a bit before you drink it.

Lately our house beer is Anchor Steam; the brewery is a short walk
from where we work. Nobody seems to know exactly what \"steam beer\"
means.
That\'s quite passable.

I second the suggestion of Marston\'s Pedigree and will add
Greene King\'s Abbot Ale (preferably bottled).

Harp is, IIRC, a lager not a beer. I think I had /one/ once
as a student.
 
M

Martin Brown

Guest
On 06/12/2021 22:49, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 06/12/21 15:24, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 15:15:24 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/12/2021 14:32, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 09:55:41 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better representatives.

We like the lighter, wheatier beers. The canned Bod is a bit muddy to
our taste, but the draft at Camelot was very different and really
tasty. They were out of Harp or we\'d have had one of those.

In that case try and find Marston\'s Pedigree (it is available in cans
and bottles and a passable version of the real thing on draft).

https://www.marstonsbrewery.co.uk/beers/pedigree/

Sometimes the local versions of furrin\' beers are actually locally
brewed, subcontracted, so may not be the same as in the old country.
Sometimes the brewery changes and you can tell the difference.

My recollection of US beers is that they are typically served ice cold.

Yes. If you don\'t like cold beer, wait a bit before you drink it.

Lately our house beer is Anchor Steam; the brewery is a short walk
from where we work. Nobody seems to know exactly what \"steam beer\"
means.

That\'s quite passable.

I second the suggestion of Marston\'s Pedigree and will add
Greene King\'s Abbot Ale (preferably bottled).
I think Abbot might be a bit rich for American tastes - their IPA might
be a nearer match. BTW do they still do Christmas Ale this time of year?

Copper dragon is another fun smallish brewery in Yorkshire that does
some nice beers of various shades if you happen upon a pub that has it.

https://www.copperdragon.co.uk

Harp is, IIRC, a lager not a beer. I think I had /one/ once
as a student.
It had that advert that was sort of true (but not quite how they meant):
\"Harp, stays sharp ... to the bottom of the glass\"

Rather a nasty acidic thin lager product for getting drunk on but with
no other redeeming features. Best consumed ice cold to mask the taste.

Stella Artois was a much better product for that purpose once you
discovered it as a student (and cooler as a Belgian beer).

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
 
T

Tom Gardner

Guest
On 07/12/21 09:04, Martin Brown wrote:
On 06/12/2021 22:49, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 06/12/21 15:24, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 15:15:24 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/12/2021 14:32, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 09:55:41 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better representatives.

We like the lighter, wheatier beers. The canned Bod is a bit muddy to
our taste, but the draft at Camelot was very different and really
tasty. They were out of Harp or we\'d have had one of those.

In that case try and find Marston\'s Pedigree (it is available in cans
and bottles and a passable version of the real thing on draft).

https://www.marstonsbrewery.co.uk/beers/pedigree/

Sometimes the local versions of furrin\' beers are actually locally
brewed, subcontracted, so may not be the same as in the old country.
Sometimes the brewery changes and you can tell the difference.

My recollection of US beers is that they are typically served ice cold.

Yes. If you don\'t like cold beer, wait a bit before you drink it.

Lately our house beer is Anchor Steam; the brewery is a short walk
from where we work. Nobody seems to know exactly what \"steam beer\"
means.

That\'s quite passable.

I second the suggestion of Marston\'s Pedigree and will add
Greene King\'s Abbot Ale (preferably bottled).

I think Abbot might be a bit rich for American tastes - their IPA might be a
nearer match. BTW do they still do Christmas Ale this time of year?
I wonder what the left pondians would make of Belgian beers :)



Copper dragon is another fun smallish brewery in Yorkshire that does some nice
beers of various shades if you happen upon a pub that has it.

https://www.copperdragon.co.uk

Harp is, IIRC, a lager not a beer. I think I had /one/ once
as a student.

It had that advert that was sort of true (but not quite how they meant):
\"Harp, stays sharp ... to the bottom of the glass\"

Rather a nasty acidic thin lager product for getting drunk on but with no other
redeeming features. Best consumed ice cold to mask the taste.
Quite.

I\'m told that nowadays cheap cider is the preferred source
of inebriation amongst the chavs, but the principle is the
same.


Stella Artois was a much better product for that purpose once you discovered it
as a student (and cooler as a Belgian beer).
I can\'t remember ever having Stella, but I do remember Coors
because it is a very close approximation to gnats\' piss.
 
S

server

Guest
On Tue, 7 Dec 2021 17:42:35 +0000, Tom Gardner
<spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

On 07/12/21 09:04, Martin Brown wrote:
On 06/12/2021 22:49, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 06/12/21 15:24, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 15:15:24 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/12/2021 14:32, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 09:55:41 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better representatives.

We like the lighter, wheatier beers. The canned Bod is a bit muddy to
our taste, but the draft at Camelot was very different and really
tasty. They were out of Harp or we\'d have had one of those.

In that case try and find Marston\'s Pedigree (it is available in cans
and bottles and a passable version of the real thing on draft).

https://www.marstonsbrewery.co.uk/beers/pedigree/

Sometimes the local versions of furrin\' beers are actually locally
brewed, subcontracted, so may not be the same as in the old country.
Sometimes the brewery changes and you can tell the difference.

My recollection of US beers is that they are typically served ice cold.

Yes. If you don\'t like cold beer, wait a bit before you drink it.

Lately our house beer is Anchor Steam; the brewery is a short walk
from where we work. Nobody seems to know exactly what \"steam beer\"
means.

That\'s quite passable.

I second the suggestion of Marston\'s Pedigree and will add
Greene King\'s Abbot Ale (preferably bottled).

I think Abbot might be a bit rich for American tastes - their IPA might be a
nearer match. BTW do they still do Christmas Ale this time of year?

I wonder what the left pondians would make of Belgian beers :)
Chimay is great stuff, especially if you can find it on draft.

Copper dragon is another fun smallish brewery in Yorkshire that does some nice
beers of various shades if you happen upon a pub that has it.

https://www.copperdragon.co.uk

Harp is, IIRC, a lager not a beer. I think I had /one/ once
as a student.

It had that advert that was sort of true (but not quite how they meant):
\"Harp, stays sharp ... to the bottom of the glass\"

Rather a nasty acidic thin lager product for getting drunk on but with no other
redeeming features. Best consumed ice cold to mask the taste.

Quite.

I\'m told that nowadays cheap cider is the preferred source
of inebriation amongst the chavs, but the principle is the
same.


Stella Artois was a much better product for that purpose once you discovered it
as a student (and cooler as a Belgian beer).

I can\'t remember ever having Stella, but I do remember Coors
because it is a very close approximation to gnats\' piss.
The Coors motto is \"It\'s The Water\", from which omit \"The.\"

Stella is a lot like Coors, or even Coors Light. If you were lost in
the desert and dying of thirst, you might possibly consider them.



--

Father Brown\'s figure remained quite dark and still;
but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was
always most valuable when he had lost it.
 
J

John Doe

Guest
jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

On Tue, 7 Dec 2021 17:42:35 +0000, Tom Gardner
spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

On 07/12/21 09:04, Martin Brown wrote:
On 06/12/2021 22:49, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 06/12/21 15:24, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 15:15:24 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/12/2021 14:32, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 09:55:41 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better
representatives.

We like the lighter, wheatier beers. The canned Bod is a bit muddy
to
our taste, but the draft at Camelot was very different and really
tasty. They were out of Harp or we\'d have had one of those.

In that case try and find Marston\'s Pedigree (it is available in cans
and bottles and a passable version of the real thing on draft).

https://www.marstonsbrewery.co.uk/beers/pedigree/

Sometimes the local versions of furrin\' beers are actually locally
brewed, subcontracted, so may not be the same as in the old country.
Sometimes the brewery changes and you can tell the difference.

My recollection of US beers is that they are typically served ice
cold.

Yes. If you don\'t like cold beer, wait a bit before you drink it.

Lately our house beer is Anchor Steam; the brewery is a short walk
from where we work. Nobody seems to know exactly what \"steam beer\"
means.

That\'s quite passable.

I second the suggestion of Marston\'s Pedigree and will add
Greene King\'s Abbot Ale (preferably bottled).

I think Abbot might be a bit rich for American tastes - their IPA might
be a
nearer match. BTW do they still do Christmas Ale this time of year?

I wonder what the left pondians would make of Belgian beers :)


Chimay is great stuff, especially if you can find it on draft.




Copper dragon is another fun smallish brewery in Yorkshire that does
some nice
beers of various shades if you happen upon a pub that has it.

https://www.copperdragon.co.uk

Harp is, IIRC, a lager not a beer. I think I had /one/ once
as a student.

It had that advert that was sort of true (but not quite how they meant):
\"Harp, stays sharp ... to the bottom of the glass\"

Rather a nasty acidic thin lager product for getting drunk on but with
no other
redeeming features. Best consumed ice cold to mask the taste.

Quite.

I\'m told that nowadays cheap cider is the preferred source
of inebriation amongst the chavs, but the principle is the
same.


Stella Artois was a much better product for that purpose once you
discovered it
as a student (and cooler as a Belgian beer).

I can\'t remember ever having Stella, but I do remember Coors
because it is a very close approximation to gnats\' piss.


The Coors motto is \"It\'s The Water\", from which omit \"The.\"

Stella is a lot like Coors, or even Coors Light. If you were lost in
the desert and dying of thirst, you might possibly consider them.
Beer is a diuretic.
 
P

Phil Hobbs

Guest
jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Tue, 7 Dec 2021 17:42:35 +0000, Tom Gardner
spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

On 07/12/21 09:04, Martin Brown wrote:
On 06/12/2021 22:49, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 06/12/21 15:24, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 15:15:24 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/12/2021 14:32, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 09:55:41 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better representatives.

We like the lighter, wheatier beers. The canned Bod is a bit muddy to
our taste, but the draft at Camelot was very different and really
tasty. They were out of Harp or we\'d have had one of those.

In that case try and find Marston\'s Pedigree (it is available in cans
and bottles and a passable version of the real thing on draft).

https://www.marstonsbrewery.co.uk/beers/pedigree/

Sometimes the local versions of furrin\' beers are actually locally
brewed, subcontracted, so may not be the same as in the old country.
Sometimes the brewery changes and you can tell the difference.

My recollection of US beers is that they are typically served ice cold.

Yes. If you don\'t like cold beer, wait a bit before you drink it.

Lately our house beer is Anchor Steam; the brewery is a short walk
from where we work. Nobody seems to know exactly what \"steam beer\"
means.

That\'s quite passable.

I second the suggestion of Marston\'s Pedigree and will add
Greene King\'s Abbot Ale (preferably bottled).

I think Abbot might be a bit rich for American tastes - their IPA might be a
nearer match. BTW do they still do Christmas Ale this time of year?

I wonder what the left pondians would make of Belgian beers :)


Chimay is great stuff, especially if you can find it on draft.




Copper dragon is another fun smallish brewery in Yorkshire that does some nice
beers of various shades if you happen upon a pub that has it.

https://www.copperdragon.co.uk

Harp is, IIRC, a lager not a beer. I think I had /one/ once
as a student.

It had that advert that was sort of true (but not quite how they meant):
\"Harp, stays sharp ... to the bottom of the glass\"

Rather a nasty acidic thin lager product for getting drunk on but with no other
redeeming features. Best consumed ice cold to mask the taste.

Quite.

I\'m told that nowadays cheap cider is the preferred source
of inebriation amongst the chavs, but the principle is the
same.


Stella Artois was a much better product for that purpose once you discovered it
as a student (and cooler as a Belgian beer).

I can\'t remember ever having Stella, but I do remember Coors
because it is a very close approximation to gnats\' piss.


The Coors motto is \"It\'s The Water\", from which omit \"The.\"

Stella is a lot like Coors, or even Coors Light. If you were lost in
the desert and dying of thirst, you might possibly consider them.
The old joke about Coors, Rolling Rock, etc. is that the reason it goes
through you so fast is that it doesn\'t stop to change colour.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
 
S

server

Guest
On Wed, 8 Dec 2021 08:21:20 -0500, Phil Hobbs
<pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Tue, 7 Dec 2021 17:42:35 +0000, Tom Gardner
spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

On 07/12/21 09:04, Martin Brown wrote:
On 06/12/2021 22:49, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 06/12/21 15:24, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 15:15:24 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/12/2021 14:32, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 09:55:41 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better representatives.

We like the lighter, wheatier beers. The canned Bod is a bit muddy to
our taste, but the draft at Camelot was very different and really
tasty. They were out of Harp or we\'d have had one of those.

In that case try and find Marston\'s Pedigree (it is available in cans
and bottles and a passable version of the real thing on draft).

https://www.marstonsbrewery.co.uk/beers/pedigree/

Sometimes the local versions of furrin\' beers are actually locally
brewed, subcontracted, so may not be the same as in the old country.
Sometimes the brewery changes and you can tell the difference.

My recollection of US beers is that they are typically served ice cold.

Yes. If you don\'t like cold beer, wait a bit before you drink it.

Lately our house beer is Anchor Steam; the brewery is a short walk
from where we work. Nobody seems to know exactly what \"steam beer\"
means.

That\'s quite passable.

I second the suggestion of Marston\'s Pedigree and will add
Greene King\'s Abbot Ale (preferably bottled).

I think Abbot might be a bit rich for American tastes - their IPA might be a
nearer match. BTW do they still do Christmas Ale this time of year?

I wonder what the left pondians would make of Belgian beers :)


Chimay is great stuff, especially if you can find it on draft.




Copper dragon is another fun smallish brewery in Yorkshire that does some nice
beers of various shades if you happen upon a pub that has it.

https://www.copperdragon.co.uk

Harp is, IIRC, a lager not a beer. I think I had /one/ once
as a student.

It had that advert that was sort of true (but not quite how they meant):
\"Harp, stays sharp ... to the bottom of the glass\"

Rather a nasty acidic thin lager product for getting drunk on but with no other
redeeming features. Best consumed ice cold to mask the taste.

Quite.

I\'m told that nowadays cheap cider is the preferred source
of inebriation amongst the chavs, but the principle is the
same.


Stella Artois was a much better product for that purpose once you discovered it
as a student (and cooler as a Belgian beer).

I can\'t remember ever having Stella, but I do remember Coors
because it is a very close approximation to gnats\' piss.


The Coors motto is \"It\'s The Water\", from which omit \"The.\"

Stella is a lot like Coors, or even Coors Light. If you were lost in
the desert and dying of thirst, you might possibly consider them.



The old joke about Coors, Rolling Rock, etc. is that the reason it goes
through you so fast is that it doesn\'t stop to change colour.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
You don\'t buy beer, you only rent it.



--

Father Brown\'s figure remained quite dark and still;
but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was
always most valuable when he had lost it.
 
M

Martin Brown

Guest
On 08/12/2021 13:34, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Wed, 8 Dec 2021 08:21:20 -0500, Phil Hobbs
pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Tue, 7 Dec 2021 17:42:35 +0000, Tom Gardner
spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

On 07/12/21 09:04, Martin Brown wrote:

Stella Artois was a much better product for that purpose once you discovered it
as a student (and cooler as a Belgian beer).

I can\'t remember ever having Stella, but I do remember Coors
because it is a very close approximation to gnats\' piss.

The Coors motto is \"It\'s The Water\", from which omit \"The.\"
We made an analytical ICPMS machine for water purity analysis for Coors
once in the dim and distant past. The guy brought crates of Coors beer
with him to sit on whilst watching the acceptance tests on a dry site!

Customer is always right so we were told that if offered we could accept
precisely one can from him provided we didn\'t do anything dangerous for
the rest of the day.

On Friday lunchtime we took him out to our local pub and he insisted on
having a half of everything on the bar (about a dozen beers). He never
made it back to the factory and his hangover lasted most of the weekend.

Stella is a lot like Coors, or even Coors Light. If you were lost in
the desert and dying of thirst, you might possibly consider them.
At 4% it might well be fatal in a desert. Better than engine oil though.
The old joke about Coors, Rolling Rock, etc. is that the reason it goes
through you so fast is that it doesn\'t stop to change colour.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

You don\'t buy beer, you only rent it.
All beer in this pub has been passed by the management.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
 
T

three_jeeps

Guest
On Monday, December 6, 2021 at 10:24:38 AM UTC-5, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 15:15:24 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/12/2021 14:32, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 6 Dec 2021 09:55:41 +0000, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 04/12/2021 23:50, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
We got hungry and one thing led to another, namely to Pacifica. If you
are ever in SF or Silicon Valley, it\'s worth a visit. It\'s a quiet
little town on the coast that\'s falling into the ocean.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hash521dl76qfi9/AAD8J_U2bWOt4f7CwLRFPkWta?dl=0

In that second pic, there\'s a sort of bunch of sticks making a fence..
Not long ago, that was a house. There are some cool drone sweeps of
that bit of coast on youtube.

Camelot is a fake british pub, but they have Guinness, Harp,
Boddington, and Bass on tap, and you can order oysters and chips.

Even as a former Mancunian I find it hard to get excited about
Boddington\'s beer or their bees (which Manchester have adopted). The
other ones are mass market churned out of chemical plants.

http://manchesterbe.es/index.php/2018/03/18/the-boddington-bees/

If you want a decent British bitter beer John Smith\'s, Marston\'s
Pedigree or Masham\'s Black Sheep are all much better representatives.

We like the lighter, wheatier beers. The canned Bod is a bit muddy to
our taste, but the draft at Camelot was very different and really
tasty. They were out of Harp or we\'d have had one of those.

In that case try and find Marston\'s Pedigree (it is available in cans
and bottles and a passable version of the real thing on draft).

https://www.marstonsbrewery.co.uk/beers/pedigree/

Sometimes the local versions of furrin\' beers are actually locally
brewed, subcontracted, so may not be the same as in the old country.
Sometimes the brewery changes and you can tell the difference.

My recollection of US beers is that they are typically served ice cold.
Yes. If you don\'t like cold beer, wait a bit before you drink it.

Lately our house beer is Anchor Steam; the brewery is a short walk
from where we work. Nobody seems to know exactly what \"steam beer\"
means.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steam_beer#In_literature
--

Father Brown\'s figure remained quite dark and still;
but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was
always most valuable when he had lost it.
I do beer brewing (and wine making) from grain as one of my hobbies. In the groups/clubs I participate in, the acknowledged definition for steam beer is that it is fermented with lager yeast but not at lagering temperatures.. Generally for lagering, the procedure is to pitch the yeast at temps of ~50 degrees F and as fermentation proceeds to gradually lower the temperature in steps. The time and duration of the steps is part of the \'secret sauce\' recipes. Generally acknowledged that most lager yeast strains do well between 48-55 degrees F but there are differences based on the type of brew being produced.
Final gravity is arrived at in 1-2 weeks, then cold storage at about 32 degrees F to 38 degrees F. Lagering at more than 8 weeks tends to have bad effects.
In some lager recipes, a diacetyl rest is used to accelerate the fermentation, then the temp is gradually reduced. Again, depends on the strain and type of beer being produced.

For steam beers, the yeast is pitched at ale temps (~ 65 degrees F) and fermentation continues at that temp (approximately) until the final gravity is reached.
Some people will try to temperature control the fermentation at 60-65 degrees F in refrigerators as fermentation generates its own heat, about 2-4 degrees F.
Cold stabilization is generally not done with steam beers.
Prost!
Also, if you want a good French wine, try California...
J
 
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