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OT: OT: China switches off AIS...

J

Jan Panteltje

Guest
OT: China switches off AIS
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/24/business/china-shipping-data-mic-intl-hnk/index.html

and not even that, more important: it endagers its own and other vessels
as AIS is used to prevent colisions.
So China scores an own goal.
 
E

Ed Lee

Guest
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 6:31:35 AM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:
OT: China switches off AIS
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/24/business/china-shipping-data-mic-intl-hnk/index.html

and not even that, more important: it endagers its own and other vessels
as AIS is used to prevent colisions.
So China scores an own goal.
Nop, they have their own version of AIS. They see you, but you don\'t see them. You will avoid collision if you pay up the insurance premium.
 
D

David Eather

Guest
On 25/11/2021 12:27 am, Jan Panteltje wrote:
OT: China switches off AIS
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/24/business/china-shipping-data-mic-intl-hnk/index.html

and not even that, more important: it endagers its own and other vessels
as AIS is used to prevent colisions.
So China scores an own goal.
I think china is preparing for war fairly soon. We just have to get used
to the idea that a Chinese ship that hasn\'t been tracked to a port and
loaded with war materials is not a threat. I would not like to be Taiwan
or Australia... Oh wait... Damn.
 
E

Ed Lee

Guest
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 8:24:37 AM UTC-8, David Eather wrote:
On 25/11/2021 12:27 am, Jan Panteltje wrote:
OT: China switches off AIS
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/24/business/china-shipping-data-mic-intl-hnk/index.html

and not even that, more important: it endagers its own and other vessels be
as AIS is used to prevent colisions.
So China scores an own goal.

I think china is preparing for war fairly soon. We just have to get used
to the idea that a Chinese ship that hasn\'t been tracked to a port and
loaded with war materials is not a threat. I would not like to be Taiwan
or Australia... Oh wait... Damn.
I think they will take Philippine and Malaysia before Australia; so you have more time.
 
J

Jan Panteltje

Guest
On a sunny day (Wed, 24 Nov 2021 06:55:22 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ed Lee
<edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote in
<2d1e3950-88b7-4bf8-9d2c-ecffefe7dea6n@googlegroups.com>:

On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 6:31:35 AM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:
OT: China switches off AIS
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/24/business/china-shipping-data-mic-intl-hnk/index.html

and not even that, more important: it endagers its own and other vessels
as AIS is used to prevent colisions.
So China scores an own goal.

Nop, they have their own version of AIS. They see you, but you don\'t see them. You will avoid collision if you pay up the
insurance premium.
I know they have their own GPS sats
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BeiDou

But AIS works at 161.975 MHz and 162.025 MHz
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_identification_system

Wrote some software for that.
http://panteltje.com/panteltje/xgpspc/index.html

I am not aware of any other similar system.
Or were you just speculating?

If they had in the RF bands any spectrum analyzer would see it
and decoding would not be such a big thing I\'d expect.
 
E

Ed Lee

Guest
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 10:45:07 AM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:
On a sunny day (Wed, 24 Nov 2021 06:55:22 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ed Lee
edward....@gmail.com> wrote in
2d1e3950-88b7-4bf8...@googlegroups.com>:
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 6:31:35 AM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:
OT: China switches off AIS
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/24/business/china-shipping-data-mic-intl-hnk/index.html

and not even that, more important: it endagers its own and other vessels
as AIS is used to prevent colisions.
So China scores an own goal.

Nop, they have their own version of AIS. They see you, but you don\'t see them. You will avoid collision if you pay up the
insurance premium.
I know they have their own GPS sats
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BeiDou

But AIS works at 161.975 MHz and 162.025 MHz
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_identification_system
They don\'t have to follow any standard freq.

Wrote some software for that.
http://panteltje.com/panteltje/xgpspc/index.html

I am not aware of any other similar system.
Or were you just speculating?
Yes, just prudent speculation.

If they had in the RF bands any spectrum analyzer would see it
and decoding would not be such a big thing I\'d expect.
At the very least, the ships can just report their positions to a central data center and figure out the mapping.
 
J

Jan Panteltje

Guest
On a sunny day (Wed, 24 Nov 2021 10:54:54 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ed Lee
<edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote in
<a76d2909-469b-4829-b1c2-caa2715f5dean@googlegroups.com>:

On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 10:45:07 AM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:
On a sunny day (Wed, 24 Nov 2021 06:55:22 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ed Lee
edward....@gmail.com> wrote in
2d1e3950-88b7-4bf8...@googlegroups.com>:
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 6:31:35 AM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:
OT: China switches off AIS
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/24/business/china-shipping-data-mic-intl-hnk/index.html

and not even that, more important: it endagers its own and other vessels
as AIS is used to prevent colisions.
So China scores an own goal.

Nop, they have their own version of AIS. They see you, but you don\'t see them. You will avoid collision if you pay up the
insurance premium.
I know they have their own GPS sats
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BeiDou

But AIS works at 161.975 MHz and 162.025 MHz
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_identification_system

They don\'t have to follow any standard freq.

Wrote some software for that.
http://panteltje.com/panteltje/xgpspc/index.html

I am not aware of any other similar system.
Or were you just speculating?

Yes, just prudent speculation.

If they had in the RF bands any spectrum analyzer would see it
and decoding would not be such a big thing I\'d expect.

At the very least, the ships can just report their positions to a central data center and figure out the mapping.
That is not so simple, reliable communication from sea to shore and vice versa over long distances is very hard.
Even when using satellite, dish aiming or outages when using lower constellations is an issue.
The whole idea was to work ship-to-ship on short distances for collision avoidance,
basically within the horizon (else earth curvature gets in your way, required antenna hight then goes up).
 
E

Ed Lee

Guest
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 12:39:14 PM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:
On a sunny day (Wed, 24 Nov 2021 10:54:54 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ed Lee
edward....@gmail.com> wrote in
a76d2909-469b-4829...@googlegroups.com>:
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 10:45:07 AM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:
On a sunny day (Wed, 24 Nov 2021 06:55:22 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ed Lee
edward....@gmail.com> wrote in
2d1e3950-88b7-4bf8...@googlegroups.com>:
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 6:31:35 AM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:
OT: China switches off AIS
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/24/business/china-shipping-data-mic-intl-hnk/index.html

and not even that, more important: it endagers its own and other vessels
as AIS is used to prevent colisions.
So China scores an own goal.

Nop, they have their own version of AIS. They see you, but you don\'t see them. You will avoid collision if you pay up the
insurance premium.
I know they have their own GPS sats
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BeiDou

But AIS works at 161.975 MHz and 162.025 MHz
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_identification_system

They don\'t have to follow any standard freq.

Wrote some software for that.
http://panteltje.com/panteltje/xgpspc/index.html

I am not aware of any other similar system.
Or were you just speculating?

Yes, just prudent speculation.

If they had in the RF bands any spectrum analyzer would see it
and decoding would not be such a big thing I\'d expect.

At the very least, the ships can just report their positions to a central data center and figure out the mapping.
That is not so simple, reliable communication from sea to shore and vice versa over long distances is very hard.
Even when using satellite, dish aiming or outages when using lower constellations is an issue.
The whole idea was to work ship-to-ship on short distances for collision avoidance,
basically within the horizon (else earth curvature gets in your way, required antenna hight then goes up).
But if you have a big company (China) controlling all their ships, they can have reliable point to point data links between ships. Including all their para-military fishing boats, they have a big surface network, not to mention all the satellites in the sky.
 
D

David Eather

Guest
On 25/11/2021 2:30 am, Ed Lee wrote:
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 8:24:37 AM UTC-8, David Eather wrote:
On 25/11/2021 12:27 am, Jan Panteltje wrote:
OT: China switches off AIS
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/24/business/china-shipping-data-mic-intl-hnk/index.html

and not even that, more important: it endagers its own and other vessels be
as AIS is used to prevent colisions.
So China scores an own goal.

I think china is preparing for war fairly soon. We just have to get used
to the idea that a Chinese ship that hasn\'t been tracked to a port and
loaded with war materials is not a threat. I would not like to be Taiwan
or Australia... Oh wait... Damn.

I think they will take Philippine and Malaysia before Australia; so you have more time.
But we have an idiot prime minister who keeps poking the dragon for his
own political gain without taking any meaningful steps to secure the
country in the short to medium term.

Yes the deal to acquire nuclear subs is nice but the UK and US aren\'t
going to lease them to us and there is no plan or building timetable all
of which means, as analysts have pointed out, that we will have a period
where our soon to be creaking, old subs will only safely work at vastly
reduced ability or not at all. The capacity gap has been pointed out for
years as has a solution- while the SA ship yards are otherwise idle
build a few more modernized Collins class at a one a year schedule.
 
S

server

Guest
David Eather <eatREMOVEher@tpg.com.au> wrote in
news:16ba881cc997b2f9$2$2362744$c2565adb@news.newsdemon.com:

On 25/11/2021 12:27 am, Jan Panteltje wrote:
OT: China switches off AIS
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/24/business/china-shipping-data-
mic-intl-hnk/index.html

and not even that, more important: it endagers its own and other
vessels as AIS is used to prevent colisions.
So China scores an own goal.


I think china is preparing for war fairly soon. We just have to
get used to the idea that a Chinese ship that hasn\'t been tracked
to a port and loaded with war materials is not a threat. I would
not like to be Taiwan or Australia... Oh wait... Damn.
Take your pick... Eather one.
 
J

Jan Panteltje

Guest
On a sunny day (Wed, 24 Nov 2021 12:45:03 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ed Lee
<edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote in
<b8d38d78-8c08-4e34-b4e2-fb5a6c581a02n@googlegroups.com>:

On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 12:39:14 PM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:
On a sunny day (Wed, 24 Nov 2021 10:54:54 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ed Lee

edward....@gmail.com> wrote in
a76d2909-469b-4829...@googlegroups.com>:
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 10:45:07 AM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:

On a sunny day (Wed, 24 Nov 2021 06:55:22 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ed Lee

edward....@gmail.com> wrote in
2d1e3950-88b7-4bf8...@googlegroups.com>:
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 6:31:35 AM UTC-8, Jan Panteltje wrote:

OT: China switches off AIS
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/24/business/china-shipping-data-mic-intl-hnk/index.html


and not even that, more important: it endagers its own and other vessels

as AIS is used to prevent colisions.
So China scores an own goal.

Nop, they have their own version of AIS. They see you, but you don\'t see
them. You will avoid collision if you pay up the
insurance premium.
I know they have their own GPS sats
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BeiDou

But AIS works at 161.975 MHz and 162.025 MHz
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_identification_system

They don\'t have to follow any standard freq.

Wrote some software for that.
http://panteltje.com/panteltje/xgpspc/index.html

I am not aware of any other similar system.
Or were you just speculating?

Yes, just prudent speculation.
LOOPTHELOOP:
If they had in the RF bands any spectrum analyzer would see it
and decoding would not be such a big thing I\'d expect.

At the very least, the ships can just report their positions to a central
data center and figure out the mapping.
That is not so simple, reliable communication from sea to shore and vice versa
over long distances is very hard.
Even when using satellite, dish aiming or outages when using lower constellations
is an issue.
The whole idea was to work ship-to-ship on short distances for collision avoidance,

basically within the horizon (else earth curvature gets in your way, required
antenna hight then goes up).

But if you have a big company (China) controlling all their ships, they can
have reliable point to point data links between ships. Including all their
para-military fishing boats, they have a big surface network, not to mention
all the satellites in the sky.
GOTO LOOPTHELOOP
 
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