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bitrex

Guest
On 11/1/2020 2:37 AM, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:56:39 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 10/31/2020 11:23 PM, Michael Terrell wrote:
On Saturday, October 31, 2020 at 12:58:53 AM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:

Lol you called the charger company and expected them to do something.

I called a mall property manager one time soon after I got the Volt to
complain about people parking their gas cars in the charger spots he
more or less told me to piss off. I don\'t bother calling anyone about
that sort of stuff anymore there\'s no one to call, nobody cares.

If you talked to him like you do here, I don\'t doubt it.


Hey, you\'re not much of sweetheart yourself, sometimes.

Anyway, it\'s a bit of an entitlement mentality to believe anyone is
going to remove a paying customer from a charging spot just cuz they\'ve
been there longer than one would like.

Some jurisdictions or properties will remove ICE cars from those spots
because that person is just a jerk or can\'t read or both and it\'s a
decent revenue stream for the jurisdiction, the offending party really
doesn\'t have much of a leg to stand on other than claiming to be
illiterate. but most places try not to offend the market segment of the
service, even when they aren\'t entirely courteous about how they use it.

Nobody is fining or towing a car for staying too long unless demand is
really high, and that\'s not most chargers. The ChargePoint phone reps
like most phone reps don\'t have the power to do anything much, if it\'s
on private property like a mall what happens to cars there is entirely
in the hands of the business or property owner ChargePoint has no power.
and they\'re not in the business of pissing off customers by
disconnecting or removing them without their consent.

By \"nobody\" you mean Tesla, right? That\'s exactly what they do. They give you 10 minutes and then you start paying $0.50 a minute after your charge is completed.

I was hooked up to a level 2 charger with a Tesla adapter and disconnected. The adapter stayed on the car and the cable was not locked to anything! Anyone could disconnect me. I don\'t think that can happen with the Tesla Superchargers, but I\'m not sure about the Tesla destination (level 2) chargers.

There are any number of reports of people doing just that, disconnecting charging cars. Some people are just strange.
Yes, a number of \"free\" chargers I\'ve seen have this as a deterrent to
staying too long also, there\'s no charge for X hours and then the rate
jumps to something like $3 or $5/hr.

But that\'s an automatic policy if someone is bound and determined to
leave their car somewhere there\'s not much one can do about it. If they
get billed a dumb rate for staying too long they have no one to be mad
at but themselves, it\'s listed what it is.

I stayed a charger longer than someone appreciated one time, I was
within the time limit but they just wanted to use it at that point so
they simply parked next to me, pulled the charger out before my car was
complete, and plugged it into their car, pretty ballsy, but that lot was
well-covered by security cameras so they figure you\'re not going to do
anything untoward out of spite to \'em and nobody is going to come arrest
them just for yoinking a charger.
 
E

Ed Lee

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:40:48 AM UTC-8, bitrex wrote:
On 11/1/2020 2:37 AM, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:56:39 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 10/31/2020 11:23 PM, Michael Terrell wrote:
On Saturday, October 31, 2020 at 12:58:53 AM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:

Lol you called the charger company and expected them to do something..

I called a mall property manager one time soon after I got the Volt to
complain about people parking their gas cars in the charger spots he
more or less told me to piss off. I don\'t bother calling anyone about
that sort of stuff anymore there\'s no one to call, nobody cares.

If you talked to him like you do here, I don\'t doubt it.


Hey, you\'re not much of sweetheart yourself, sometimes.

Anyway, it\'s a bit of an entitlement mentality to believe anyone is
going to remove a paying customer from a charging spot just cuz they\'ve
been there longer than one would like.

Some jurisdictions or properties will remove ICE cars from those spots
because that person is just a jerk or can\'t read or both and it\'s a
decent revenue stream for the jurisdiction, the offending party really
doesn\'t have much of a leg to stand on other than claiming to be
illiterate. but most places try not to offend the market segment of the
service, even when they aren\'t entirely courteous about how they use it.

Nobody is fining or towing a car for staying too long unless demand is
really high, and that\'s not most chargers. The ChargePoint phone reps
like most phone reps don\'t have the power to do anything much, if it\'s
on private property like a mall what happens to cars there is entirely
in the hands of the business or property owner ChargePoint has no power.
and they\'re not in the business of pissing off customers by
disconnecting or removing them without their consent.

By \"nobody\" you mean Tesla, right? That\'s exactly what they do. They give you 10 minutes and then you start paying $0.50 a minute after your charge is completed.

I was hooked up to a level 2 charger with a Tesla adapter and disconnected. The adapter stayed on the car and the cable was not locked to anything! Anyone could disconnect me. I don\'t think that can happen with the Tesla Superchargers, but I\'m not sure about the Tesla destination (level 2) chargers.

There are any number of reports of people doing just that, disconnecting charging cars. Some people are just strange.

Yes, a number of \"free\" chargers I\'ve seen have this as a deterrent to
staying too long also, there\'s no charge for X hours and then the rate
jumps to something like $3 or $5/hr.

But that\'s an automatic policy if someone is bound and determined to
leave their car somewhere there\'s not much one can do about it. If they
get billed a dumb rate for staying too long they have no one to be mad
at but themselves, it\'s listed what it is.

I stayed a charger longer than someone appreciated one time, I was
within the time limit but they just wanted to use it at that point so
they simply parked next to me, pulled the charger out before my car was
complete, and plugged it into their car, pretty ballsy, but that lot was
well-covered by security cameras so they figure you\'re not going to do
anything untoward out of spite to \'em and nobody is going to come arrest
them just for yoinking a charger.
That is going to happen when there is only one charger (or anything else) within 30 miles of a rest stop. So, we need to have so kind of scheduling policy. I am suggesting multiple plugs (plugs are cheap), but limiting powers. For instance, first EV got 30 minutes at full power, but drop to half power after 30 minutes if there are others waiting in the queue.
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 4:40:48 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 11/1/2020 2:37 AM, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:56:39 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 10/31/2020 11:23 PM, Michael Terrell wrote:
On Saturday, October 31, 2020 at 12:58:53 AM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:

Lol you called the charger company and expected them to do something..

I called a mall property manager one time soon after I got the Volt to
complain about people parking their gas cars in the charger spots he
more or less told me to piss off. I don\'t bother calling anyone about
that sort of stuff anymore there\'s no one to call, nobody cares.

If you talked to him like you do here, I don\'t doubt it.


Hey, you\'re not much of sweetheart yourself, sometimes.

Anyway, it\'s a bit of an entitlement mentality to believe anyone is
going to remove a paying customer from a charging spot just cuz they\'ve
been there longer than one would like.

Some jurisdictions or properties will remove ICE cars from those spots
because that person is just a jerk or can\'t read or both and it\'s a
decent revenue stream for the jurisdiction, the offending party really
doesn\'t have much of a leg to stand on other than claiming to be
illiterate. but most places try not to offend the market segment of the
service, even when they aren\'t entirely courteous about how they use it.

Nobody is fining or towing a car for staying too long unless demand is
really high, and that\'s not most chargers. The ChargePoint phone reps
like most phone reps don\'t have the power to do anything much, if it\'s
on private property like a mall what happens to cars there is entirely
in the hands of the business or property owner ChargePoint has no power.
and they\'re not in the business of pissing off customers by
disconnecting or removing them without their consent.

By \"nobody\" you mean Tesla, right? That\'s exactly what they do. They give you 10 minutes and then you start paying $0.50 a minute after your charge is completed.

I was hooked up to a level 2 charger with a Tesla adapter and disconnected. The adapter stayed on the car and the cable was not locked to anything! Anyone could disconnect me. I don\'t think that can happen with the Tesla Superchargers, but I\'m not sure about the Tesla destination (level 2) chargers.

There are any number of reports of people doing just that, disconnecting charging cars. Some people are just strange.


Yes, a number of \"free\" chargers I\'ve seen have this as a deterrent to
staying too long also, there\'s no charge for X hours and then the rate
jumps to something like $3 or $5/hr.

But that\'s an automatic policy if someone is bound and determined to
leave their car somewhere there\'s not much one can do about it. If they
get billed a dumb rate for staying too long they have no one to be mad
at but themselves, it\'s listed what it is.

I stayed a charger longer than someone appreciated one time, I was
within the time limit but they just wanted to use it at that point so
they simply parked next to me, pulled the charger out before my car was
complete, and plugged it into their car, pretty ballsy, but that lot was
well-covered by security cameras so they figure you\'re not going to do
anything untoward out of spite to \'em and nobody is going to come arrest
them just for yoinking a charger.
I don\'t think any chargers other than Tesla know what car they are plugged into. So unplugging your car and plugging theirs in is theft.

I seem to recall CA passing a law requiring clear notification on the charger of the rates which should include idle fees. Something in it would mean each \"pump\" would need an LCD display. Tesla would have a cow with that since there information is all through the car and the chargers have no displays.

--

Rick C.

+-- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
+-- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 11:03:23 AM UTC-5, Ed Lee wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:40:48 AM UTC-8, bitrex wrote:
On 11/1/2020 2:37 AM, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:56:39 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 10/31/2020 11:23 PM, Michael Terrell wrote:
On Saturday, October 31, 2020 at 12:58:53 AM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:

Lol you called the charger company and expected them to do something.

I called a mall property manager one time soon after I got the Volt to
complain about people parking their gas cars in the charger spots he
more or less told me to piss off. I don\'t bother calling anyone about
that sort of stuff anymore there\'s no one to call, nobody cares.

If you talked to him like you do here, I don\'t doubt it.


Hey, you\'re not much of sweetheart yourself, sometimes.

Anyway, it\'s a bit of an entitlement mentality to believe anyone is
going to remove a paying customer from a charging spot just cuz they\'ve
been there longer than one would like.

Some jurisdictions or properties will remove ICE cars from those spots
because that person is just a jerk or can\'t read or both and it\'s a
decent revenue stream for the jurisdiction, the offending party really
doesn\'t have much of a leg to stand on other than claiming to be
illiterate. but most places try not to offend the market segment of the
service, even when they aren\'t entirely courteous about how they use it.

Nobody is fining or towing a car for staying too long unless demand is
really high, and that\'s not most chargers. The ChargePoint phone reps
like most phone reps don\'t have the power to do anything much, if it\'s
on private property like a mall what happens to cars there is entirely
in the hands of the business or property owner ChargePoint has no power.
and they\'re not in the business of pissing off customers by
disconnecting or removing them without their consent.

By \"nobody\" you mean Tesla, right? That\'s exactly what they do. They give you 10 minutes and then you start paying $0.50 a minute after your charge is completed.

I was hooked up to a level 2 charger with a Tesla adapter and disconnected. The adapter stayed on the car and the cable was not locked to anything! Anyone could disconnect me. I don\'t think that can happen with the Tesla Superchargers, but I\'m not sure about the Tesla destination (level 2) chargers.

There are any number of reports of people doing just that, disconnecting charging cars. Some people are just strange.

Yes, a number of \"free\" chargers I\'ve seen have this as a deterrent to
staying too long also, there\'s no charge for X hours and then the rate
jumps to something like $3 or $5/hr.

But that\'s an automatic policy if someone is bound and determined to
leave their car somewhere there\'s not much one can do about it. If they
get billed a dumb rate for staying too long they have no one to be mad
at but themselves, it\'s listed what it is.

I stayed a charger longer than someone appreciated one time, I was
within the time limit but they just wanted to use it at that point so
they simply parked next to me, pulled the charger out before my car was
complete, and plugged it into their car, pretty ballsy, but that lot was
well-covered by security cameras so they figure you\'re not going to do
anything untoward out of spite to \'em and nobody is going to come arrest
them just for yoinking a charger.

That is going to happen when there is only one charger (or anything else) within 30 miles of a rest stop. So, we need to have so kind of scheduling policy. I am suggesting multiple plugs (plugs are cheap), but limiting powers. For instance, first EV got 30 minutes at full power, but drop to half power after 30 minutes if there are others waiting in the queue.
Messy, complicated, subject to technical issues and will require custom designed equipment. When you plug in how would the system know anyone else is waiting? What happens if you plug in and the power glitches looking like you unplugged. Now you are at the end of the line.

Standard equipment should be used pretty much everywhere. The commercial market will provide solutions as problems arise. You just can\'t expect them to address your particular solution any more than you can expect the government to do so.

I waited a year plus for a charger to appear in Frederick, MD. Once it did my charging issues were over. I just wish other car companies addressed the charging issue so directly. One flaw in the Tesla approach is that it is proprietary. A Telsa does not charge at other level 3 chargers without an expensive adapter. My car doesn\'t charge at all. I need to get that fixed.

--

Rick C.

+-+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
+-+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
E

Ed Lee

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 9:12:02 AM UTC-8, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 4:40:48 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 11/1/2020 2:37 AM, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:56:39 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 10/31/2020 11:23 PM, Michael Terrell wrote:
On Saturday, October 31, 2020 at 12:58:53 AM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:

Lol you called the charger company and expected them to do something.

I called a mall property manager one time soon after I got the Volt to
complain about people parking their gas cars in the charger spots he
more or less told me to piss off. I don\'t bother calling anyone about
that sort of stuff anymore there\'s no one to call, nobody cares.

If you talked to him like you do here, I don\'t doubt it.


Hey, you\'re not much of sweetheart yourself, sometimes.

Anyway, it\'s a bit of an entitlement mentality to believe anyone is
going to remove a paying customer from a charging spot just cuz they\'ve
been there longer than one would like.

Some jurisdictions or properties will remove ICE cars from those spots
because that person is just a jerk or can\'t read or both and it\'s a
decent revenue stream for the jurisdiction, the offending party really
doesn\'t have much of a leg to stand on other than claiming to be
illiterate. but most places try not to offend the market segment of the
service, even when they aren\'t entirely courteous about how they use it.

Nobody is fining or towing a car for staying too long unless demand is
really high, and that\'s not most chargers. The ChargePoint phone reps
like most phone reps don\'t have the power to do anything much, if it\'s
on private property like a mall what happens to cars there is entirely
in the hands of the business or property owner ChargePoint has no power.
and they\'re not in the business of pissing off customers by
disconnecting or removing them without their consent.

By \"nobody\" you mean Tesla, right? That\'s exactly what they do. They give you 10 minutes and then you start paying $0.50 a minute after your charge is completed.

I was hooked up to a level 2 charger with a Tesla adapter and disconnected. The adapter stayed on the car and the cable was not locked to anything! Anyone could disconnect me. I don\'t think that can happen with the Tesla Superchargers, but I\'m not sure about the Tesla destination (level 2) chargers.

There are any number of reports of people doing just that, disconnecting charging cars. Some people are just strange.


Yes, a number of \"free\" chargers I\'ve seen have this as a deterrent to
staying too long also, there\'s no charge for X hours and then the rate
jumps to something like $3 or $5/hr.

But that\'s an automatic policy if someone is bound and determined to
leave their car somewhere there\'s not much one can do about it. If they
get billed a dumb rate for staying too long they have no one to be mad
at but themselves, it\'s listed what it is.

I stayed a charger longer than someone appreciated one time, I was
within the time limit but they just wanted to use it at that point so
they simply parked next to me, pulled the charger out before my car was
complete, and plugged it into their car, pretty ballsy, but that lot was
well-covered by security cameras so they figure you\'re not going to do
anything untoward out of spite to \'em and nobody is going to come arrest
them just for yoinking a charger.

I don\'t think any chargers other than Tesla know what car they are plugged into. So unplugging your car and plugging theirs in is theft.
All paid charger would terminate the session if disconnected. If you unplug and replug, you have to start your own session. It\'s not theft, just uncivilized action. I did unplug someone\'s free session uncivilly. When he came back, I apologized and offer coupled of dollars for compensation of the free electricity. He didn\'t take the money.
 
E

Ed Lee

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 9:19:14 AM UTC-8, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 11:03:23 AM UTC-5, Ed Lee wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:40:48 AM UTC-8, bitrex wrote:
On 11/1/2020 2:37 AM, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:56:39 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 10/31/2020 11:23 PM, Michael Terrell wrote:
On Saturday, October 31, 2020 at 12:58:53 AM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:

Lol you called the charger company and expected them to do something.

I called a mall property manager one time soon after I got the Volt to
complain about people parking their gas cars in the charger spots he
more or less told me to piss off. I don\'t bother calling anyone about
that sort of stuff anymore there\'s no one to call, nobody cares.

If you talked to him like you do here, I don\'t doubt it.


Hey, you\'re not much of sweetheart yourself, sometimes.

Anyway, it\'s a bit of an entitlement mentality to believe anyone is
going to remove a paying customer from a charging spot just cuz they\'ve
been there longer than one would like.

Some jurisdictions or properties will remove ICE cars from those spots
because that person is just a jerk or can\'t read or both and it\'s a
decent revenue stream for the jurisdiction, the offending party really
doesn\'t have much of a leg to stand on other than claiming to be
illiterate. but most places try not to offend the market segment of the
service, even when they aren\'t entirely courteous about how they use it.

Nobody is fining or towing a car for staying too long unless demand is
really high, and that\'s not most chargers. The ChargePoint phone reps
like most phone reps don\'t have the power to do anything much, if it\'s
on private property like a mall what happens to cars there is entirely
in the hands of the business or property owner ChargePoint has no power.
and they\'re not in the business of pissing off customers by
disconnecting or removing them without their consent.

By \"nobody\" you mean Tesla, right? That\'s exactly what they do. They give you 10 minutes and then you start paying $0.50 a minute after your charge is completed.

I was hooked up to a level 2 charger with a Tesla adapter and disconnected. The adapter stayed on the car and the cable was not locked to anything! Anyone could disconnect me. I don\'t think that can happen with the Tesla Superchargers, but I\'m not sure about the Tesla destination (level 2) chargers.

There are any number of reports of people doing just that, disconnecting charging cars. Some people are just strange.

Yes, a number of \"free\" chargers I\'ve seen have this as a deterrent to
staying too long also, there\'s no charge for X hours and then the rate
jumps to something like $3 or $5/hr.

But that\'s an automatic policy if someone is bound and determined to
leave their car somewhere there\'s not much one can do about it. If they
get billed a dumb rate for staying too long they have no one to be mad
at but themselves, it\'s listed what it is.

I stayed a charger longer than someone appreciated one time, I was
within the time limit but they just wanted to use it at that point so
they simply parked next to me, pulled the charger out before my car was
complete, and plugged it into their car, pretty ballsy, but that lot was
well-covered by security cameras so they figure you\'re not going to do
anything untoward out of spite to \'em and nobody is going to come arrest
them just for yoinking a charger.

That is going to happen when there is only one charger (or anything else) within 30 miles of a rest stop. So, we need to have so kind of scheduling policy. I am suggesting multiple plugs (plugs are cheap), but limiting powers. For instance, first EV got 30 minutes at full power, but drop to half power after 30 minutes if there are others waiting in the queue.

Messy, complicated, subject to technical issues and will require custom designed equipment.
Nothing we engineer can\'t solve. I offer to build and pay for all the equipment, as long as i don\'t get a dime out of it. Federal policy prohibit people from profiting in these sites.

> When you plug in how would the system know anyone else is waiting?

When someone connects another plug in the system.

> What happens if you plug in and the power glitches looking like you unplugged. Now you are at the end of the line.

No, you just have to wait 30 minutes if some else is already there. Anyway, power glitches would likely affect all of them. If the system can\'t remember states before the glitch, then it\'s not too robust at all.

> Standard equipment should be used pretty much everywhere.

It would have to go through the procurement mess for commercial paid network. Which company (other than Biden\'s) should be allowed to benefit on government properties.

> The commercial market will provide solutions as problems arise. You just can\'t expect them to address your particular solution any more than you can expect the government to do so.

Yes, i don\'t expect any commercial solution at all.

I waited a year plus for a charger to appear in Frederick, MD. Once it did my charging issues were over. I just wish other car companies addressed the charging issue so directly. One flaw in the Tesla approach is that it is proprietary. A Telsa does not charge at other level 3 chargers without an expensive adapter. My car doesn\'t charge at all. I need to get that fixed.
Other cars does not charge at all with Tesla charger. At least Tesla cars can charge with an adaptor. We can also include Tesla adaptor on site, if Tesla would provide it.
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 12:36:31 PM UTC-5, Ed Lee wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 9:19:14 AM UTC-8, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 11:03:23 AM UTC-5, Ed Lee wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:40:48 AM UTC-8, bitrex wrote:
On 11/1/2020 2:37 AM, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:56:39 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 10/31/2020 11:23 PM, Michael Terrell wrote:
On Saturday, October 31, 2020 at 12:58:53 AM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:

Lol you called the charger company and expected them to do something.

I called a mall property manager one time soon after I got the Volt to
complain about people parking their gas cars in the charger spots he
more or less told me to piss off. I don\'t bother calling anyone about
that sort of stuff anymore there\'s no one to call, nobody cares.

If you talked to him like you do here, I don\'t doubt it.


Hey, you\'re not much of sweetheart yourself, sometimes.

Anyway, it\'s a bit of an entitlement mentality to believe anyone is
going to remove a paying customer from a charging spot just cuz they\'ve
been there longer than one would like.

Some jurisdictions or properties will remove ICE cars from those spots
because that person is just a jerk or can\'t read or both and it\'s a
decent revenue stream for the jurisdiction, the offending party really
doesn\'t have much of a leg to stand on other than claiming to be
illiterate. but most places try not to offend the market segment of the
service, even when they aren\'t entirely courteous about how they use it.

Nobody is fining or towing a car for staying too long unless demand is
really high, and that\'s not most chargers. The ChargePoint phone reps
like most phone reps don\'t have the power to do anything much, if it\'s
on private property like a mall what happens to cars there is entirely
in the hands of the business or property owner ChargePoint has no power.
and they\'re not in the business of pissing off customers by
disconnecting or removing them without their consent.

By \"nobody\" you mean Tesla, right? That\'s exactly what they do. They give you 10 minutes and then you start paying $0.50 a minute after your charge is completed.

I was hooked up to a level 2 charger with a Tesla adapter and disconnected. The adapter stayed on the car and the cable was not locked to anything! Anyone could disconnect me. I don\'t think that can happen with the Tesla Superchargers, but I\'m not sure about the Tesla destination (level 2) chargers.

There are any number of reports of people doing just that, disconnecting charging cars. Some people are just strange.

Yes, a number of \"free\" chargers I\'ve seen have this as a deterrent to
staying too long also, there\'s no charge for X hours and then the rate
jumps to something like $3 or $5/hr.

But that\'s an automatic policy if someone is bound and determined to
leave their car somewhere there\'s not much one can do about it. If they
get billed a dumb rate for staying too long they have no one to be mad
at but themselves, it\'s listed what it is.

I stayed a charger longer than someone appreciated one time, I was
within the time limit but they just wanted to use it at that point so
they simply parked next to me, pulled the charger out before my car was
complete, and plugged it into their car, pretty ballsy, but that lot was
well-covered by security cameras so they figure you\'re not going to do
anything untoward out of spite to \'em and nobody is going to come arrest
them just for yoinking a charger.

That is going to happen when there is only one charger (or anything else) within 30 miles of a rest stop. So, we need to have so kind of scheduling policy. I am suggesting multiple plugs (plugs are cheap), but limiting powers. For instance, first EV got 30 minutes at full power, but drop to half power after 30 minutes if there are others waiting in the queue.

Messy, complicated, subject to technical issues and will require custom designed equipment.

Nothing we engineer can\'t solve. I offer to build and pay for all the equipment, as long as i don\'t get a dime out of it. Federal policy prohibit people from profiting in these sites.
Great! My house is a rest stop. Please install a system.


When you plug in how would the system know anyone else is waiting?

When someone connects another plug in the system.

What happens if you plug in and the power glitches looking like you unplugged. Now you are at the end of the line.

No, you just have to wait 30 minutes if some else is already there. Anyway, power glitches would likely affect all of them. If the system can\'t remember states before the glitch, then it\'s not too robust at all.
You aren\'t grasping the question.


Standard equipment should be used pretty much everywhere.

It would have to go through the procurement mess for commercial paid network. Which company (other than Biden\'s) should be allowed to benefit on government properties.
Please don\'t be silly. The government has all sorts of such contracts. I went on a hike recently and the map program had a hard time finding the location for the start because it was a concession and they had just changed the name. All in a national park. This is not rocket science. Worse, it\'s GSA or GAO or someone with the government, but they have means for privately operated activities on government property. It\'s called a \"contract\".


The commercial market will provide solutions as problems arise. You just can\'t expect them to address your particular solution any more than you can expect the government to do so.

Yes, i don\'t expect any commercial solution at all.
Exactly. You are showing your limits, not the limits of the government or the commercial market.


I waited a year plus for a charger to appear in Frederick, MD. Once it did my charging issues were over. I just wish other car companies addressed the charging issue so directly. One flaw in the Tesla approach is that it is proprietary. A Telsa does not charge at other level 3 chargers without an expensive adapter. My car doesn\'t charge at all. I need to get that fixed..


Other cars does not charge at all with Tesla charger. At least Tesla cars can charge with an adaptor. We can also include Tesla adaptor on site, if Tesla would provide it.
What site??? Oh, you mean the one you are willing to build on your dime?

--

Rick C.

++- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
++- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 12:22:36 PM UTC-5, Ed Lee wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 9:12:02 AM UTC-8, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 4:40:48 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 11/1/2020 2:37 AM, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:56:39 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 10/31/2020 11:23 PM, Michael Terrell wrote:
On Saturday, October 31, 2020 at 12:58:53 AM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:

Lol you called the charger company and expected them to do something.

I called a mall property manager one time soon after I got the Volt to
complain about people parking their gas cars in the charger spots he
more or less told me to piss off. I don\'t bother calling anyone about
that sort of stuff anymore there\'s no one to call, nobody cares.

If you talked to him like you do here, I don\'t doubt it.


Hey, you\'re not much of sweetheart yourself, sometimes.

Anyway, it\'s a bit of an entitlement mentality to believe anyone is
going to remove a paying customer from a charging spot just cuz they\'ve
been there longer than one would like.

Some jurisdictions or properties will remove ICE cars from those spots
because that person is just a jerk or can\'t read or both and it\'s a
decent revenue stream for the jurisdiction, the offending party really
doesn\'t have much of a leg to stand on other than claiming to be
illiterate. but most places try not to offend the market segment of the
service, even when they aren\'t entirely courteous about how they use it.

Nobody is fining or towing a car for staying too long unless demand is
really high, and that\'s not most chargers. The ChargePoint phone reps
like most phone reps don\'t have the power to do anything much, if it\'s
on private property like a mall what happens to cars there is entirely
in the hands of the business or property owner ChargePoint has no power.
and they\'re not in the business of pissing off customers by
disconnecting or removing them without their consent.

By \"nobody\" you mean Tesla, right? That\'s exactly what they do. They give you 10 minutes and then you start paying $0.50 a minute after your charge is completed.

I was hooked up to a level 2 charger with a Tesla adapter and disconnected. The adapter stayed on the car and the cable was not locked to anything! Anyone could disconnect me. I don\'t think that can happen with the Tesla Superchargers, but I\'m not sure about the Tesla destination (level 2) chargers.

There are any number of reports of people doing just that, disconnecting charging cars. Some people are just strange.


Yes, a number of \"free\" chargers I\'ve seen have this as a deterrent to
staying too long also, there\'s no charge for X hours and then the rate
jumps to something like $3 or $5/hr.

But that\'s an automatic policy if someone is bound and determined to
leave their car somewhere there\'s not much one can do about it. If they
get billed a dumb rate for staying too long they have no one to be mad
at but themselves, it\'s listed what it is.

I stayed a charger longer than someone appreciated one time, I was
within the time limit but they just wanted to use it at that point so
they simply parked next to me, pulled the charger out before my car was
complete, and plugged it into their car, pretty ballsy, but that lot was
well-covered by security cameras so they figure you\'re not going to do
anything untoward out of spite to \'em and nobody is going to come arrest
them just for yoinking a charger.

I don\'t think any chargers other than Tesla know what car they are plugged into. So unplugging your car and plugging theirs in is theft.

All paid charger would terminate the session if disconnected. If you unplug and replug, you have to start your own session. It\'s not theft, just uncivilized action. I did unplug someone\'s free session uncivilly. When he came back, I apologized and offer coupled of dollars for compensation of the free electricity. He didn\'t take the money.
Oh, so worse, you left someone stranded when they expected to get a charge. I\'d drive away then walk back and key your car.

--

Rick C.

+++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
+++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
E

Ed Lee

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 10:14:33 AM UTC-8, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 12:36:31 PM UTC-5, Ed Lee wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 9:19:14 AM UTC-8, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 11:03:23 AM UTC-5, Ed Lee wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:40:48 AM UTC-8, bitrex wrote:
On 11/1/2020 2:37 AM, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:56:39 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 10/31/2020 11:23 PM, Michael Terrell wrote:
On Saturday, October 31, 2020 at 12:58:53 AM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:

Lol you called the charger company and expected them to do something.

I called a mall property manager one time soon after I got the Volt to
complain about people parking their gas cars in the charger spots he
more or less told me to piss off. I don\'t bother calling anyone about
that sort of stuff anymore there\'s no one to call, nobody cares.

If you talked to him like you do here, I don\'t doubt it.


Hey, you\'re not much of sweetheart yourself, sometimes.

Anyway, it\'s a bit of an entitlement mentality to believe anyone is
going to remove a paying customer from a charging spot just cuz they\'ve
been there longer than one would like.

Some jurisdictions or properties will remove ICE cars from those spots
because that person is just a jerk or can\'t read or both and it\'s a
decent revenue stream for the jurisdiction, the offending party really
doesn\'t have much of a leg to stand on other than claiming to be
illiterate. but most places try not to offend the market segment of the
service, even when they aren\'t entirely courteous about how they use it.

Nobody is fining or towing a car for staying too long unless demand is
really high, and that\'s not most chargers. The ChargePoint phone reps
like most phone reps don\'t have the power to do anything much, if it\'s
on private property like a mall what happens to cars there is entirely
in the hands of the business or property owner ChargePoint has no power.
and they\'re not in the business of pissing off customers by
disconnecting or removing them without their consent.

By \"nobody\" you mean Tesla, right? That\'s exactly what they do. They give you 10 minutes and then you start paying $0.50 a minute after your charge is completed.

I was hooked up to a level 2 charger with a Tesla adapter and disconnected. The adapter stayed on the car and the cable was not locked to anything! Anyone could disconnect me. I don\'t think that can happen with the Tesla Superchargers, but I\'m not sure about the Tesla destination (level 2) chargers.

There are any number of reports of people doing just that, disconnecting charging cars. Some people are just strange.

Yes, a number of \"free\" chargers I\'ve seen have this as a deterrent to
staying too long also, there\'s no charge for X hours and then the rate
jumps to something like $3 or $5/hr.

But that\'s an automatic policy if someone is bound and determined to
leave their car somewhere there\'s not much one can do about it. If they
get billed a dumb rate for staying too long they have no one to be mad
at but themselves, it\'s listed what it is.

I stayed a charger longer than someone appreciated one time, I was
within the time limit but they just wanted to use it at that point so
they simply parked next to me, pulled the charger out before my car was
complete, and plugged it into their car, pretty ballsy, but that lot was
well-covered by security cameras so they figure you\'re not going to do
anything untoward out of spite to \'em and nobody is going to come arrest
them just for yoinking a charger.

That is going to happen when there is only one charger (or anything else) within 30 miles of a rest stop. So, we need to have so kind of scheduling policy. I am suggesting multiple plugs (plugs are cheap), but limiting powers. For instance, first EV got 30 minutes at full power, but drop to half power after 30 minutes if there are others waiting in the queue.

Messy, complicated, subject to technical issues and will require custom designed equipment.

Nothing we engineer can\'t solve. I offer to build and pay for all the equipment, as long as i don\'t get a dime out of it. Federal policy prohibit people from profiting in these sites.

Great! My house is a rest stop. Please install a system.
Yes, if you house is on my route and nothing else exist within 30 miles. I\'ll build it.

When you plug in how would the system know anyone else is waiting?

When someone connects another plug in the system.

What happens if you plug in and the power glitches looking like you unplugged. Now you are at the end of the line.

No, you just have to wait 30 minutes if some else is already there. Anyway, power glitches would likely affect all of them. If the system can\'t remember states before the glitch, then it\'s not too robust at all.
You aren\'t grasping the question.
Standard equipment should be used pretty much everywhere.

It would have to go through the procurement mess for commercial paid network. Which company (other than Biden\'s) should be allowed to benefit on government properties.
Please don\'t be silly. The government has all sorts of such contracts. I went on a hike recently and the map program had a hard time finding the location for the start because it was a concession and they had just changed the name. All in a national park. This is not rocket science. Worse, it\'s GSA or GAO or someone with the government, but they have means for privately operated activities on government property. It\'s called a \"contract\".
The commercial market will provide solutions as problems arise. You just can\'t expect them to address your particular solution any more than you can expect the government to do so.

Yes, i don\'t expect any commercial solution at all.
Exactly. You are showing your limits, not the limits of the government or the commercial market.
It\'s not impossible, but very time consuming.

I waited a year plus for a charger to appear in Frederick, MD. Once it did my charging issues were over. I just wish other car companies addressed the charging issue so directly. One flaw in the Tesla approach is that it is proprietary. A Telsa does not charge at other level 3 chargers without an expensive adapter. My car doesn\'t charge at all. I need to get that fixed.


Other cars does not charge at all with Tesla charger. At least Tesla cars can charge with an adaptor. We can also include Tesla adaptor on site, if Tesla would provide it.
What site??? Oh, you mean the one you are willing to build on your dime?
Yes, there is one site on top of LA mountain that i would be willing to build at my cost. Because of change in altitude from 2000\' to 5000\', i can drive in LA, but not out of LA.
 
E

Ed Lee

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 10:15:59 AM UTC-8, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 12:22:36 PM UTC-5, Ed Lee wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 9:12:02 AM UTC-8, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 4:40:48 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 11/1/2020 2:37 AM, Ricketty C wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 1:56:39 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
On 10/31/2020 11:23 PM, Michael Terrell wrote:
On Saturday, October 31, 2020 at 12:58:53 AM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:

Lol you called the charger company and expected them to do something.

I called a mall property manager one time soon after I got the Volt to
complain about people parking their gas cars in the charger spots he
more or less told me to piss off. I don\'t bother calling anyone about
that sort of stuff anymore there\'s no one to call, nobody cares.

If you talked to him like you do here, I don\'t doubt it.


Hey, you\'re not much of sweetheart yourself, sometimes.

Anyway, it\'s a bit of an entitlement mentality to believe anyone is
going to remove a paying customer from a charging spot just cuz they\'ve
been there longer than one would like.

Some jurisdictions or properties will remove ICE cars from those spots
because that person is just a jerk or can\'t read or both and it\'s a
decent revenue stream for the jurisdiction, the offending party really
doesn\'t have much of a leg to stand on other than claiming to be
illiterate. but most places try not to offend the market segment of the
service, even when they aren\'t entirely courteous about how they use it.

Nobody is fining or towing a car for staying too long unless demand is
really high, and that\'s not most chargers. The ChargePoint phone reps
like most phone reps don\'t have the power to do anything much, if it\'s
on private property like a mall what happens to cars there is entirely
in the hands of the business or property owner ChargePoint has no power.
and they\'re not in the business of pissing off customers by
disconnecting or removing them without their consent.

By \"nobody\" you mean Tesla, right? That\'s exactly what they do. They give you 10 minutes and then you start paying $0.50 a minute after your charge is completed.

I was hooked up to a level 2 charger with a Tesla adapter and disconnected. The adapter stayed on the car and the cable was not locked to anything! Anyone could disconnect me. I don\'t think that can happen with the Tesla Superchargers, but I\'m not sure about the Tesla destination (level 2) chargers.

There are any number of reports of people doing just that, disconnecting charging cars. Some people are just strange.


Yes, a number of \"free\" chargers I\'ve seen have this as a deterrent to
staying too long also, there\'s no charge for X hours and then the rate
jumps to something like $3 or $5/hr.

But that\'s an automatic policy if someone is bound and determined to
leave their car somewhere there\'s not much one can do about it. If they
get billed a dumb rate for staying too long they have no one to be mad
at but themselves, it\'s listed what it is.

I stayed a charger longer than someone appreciated one time, I was
within the time limit but they just wanted to use it at that point so
they simply parked next to me, pulled the charger out before my car was
complete, and plugged it into their car, pretty ballsy, but that lot was
well-covered by security cameras so they figure you\'re not going to do
anything untoward out of spite to \'em and nobody is going to come arrest
them just for yoinking a charger.


I don\'t think any chargers other than Tesla know what car they are plugged into. So unplugging your car and plugging theirs in is theft.

All paid charger would terminate the session if disconnected. If you unplug and replug, you have to start your own session. It\'s not theft, just uncivilized action. I did unplug someone\'s free session uncivilly. When he came back, I apologized and offer coupled of dollars for compensation of the free electricity. He didn\'t take the money.

Oh, so worse, you left someone stranded when they expected to get a charge. I\'d drive away then walk back and key your car.
Fortunately, he is not a jerk like you. He was quite polite and OK with the situation.
 
S

server

Guest
On Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 4:53:46 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:

> Communism is taking private properties for sharing. Free service is socialism at best.

\'Free\' charging is still taking other people\'s property through taxes, to subsidize mostly richer people\'s electric fun cars.

> Yes, i am open to charging for charging (for example, 15 cents per kwh). 25 cents for using the bathroom. and 5 cents per minutes when parked at night (when the street lights are on). Or just $1 for entering the rest area.

A pay-to-charge approach that bills for time and kWH would solve your problem of Teslas hogging the stations, and it would result in lots of private people getting interested in building out a charging network.

That sounds constructive.

> It\'s a lot simpler to just use sale taxes to fund these services.

But that\'s robbing the poor to subsidize the rich -- it\'s not just, and it\'s not fair.

Cheers,
James Arthur
 
S

server

Guest
On Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 11:09:54 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 05:55:59 -0500, Dean Hoffman <deanhofman@clod.com
wrote:

I took a quick look on the Carvana vehicle sales site. The
cheapest I found was a
2021 Chevy Spark LS hatchback, $10287. The cheapest sedan was a
2020 Mitsubishi Mirage G4 ES, $10,474. The cheapest pickup was a
2020 Dodge Ram 1500 Tradesman, $18,017. A 2020 Tesla Model X
Long Range with 11,300 miles is for sale on Auto Trader for $96588.
California\'s ban on selling new internal combustion driven vehicles
starts in 2035. There must be people thinking about the auto parts store
business. California mechanics might be king in twenty years or so
unless this silly ban is lifted.

The pols here want to force every car to be electric, and are
simultaneously destroying our ability to provide a reliable electric
supply. There is also a trend to banning natural gas in residences and
to not use fossil fuels to make electricity.
Wouldn\'t be easier if Newsome would just go ahead and ban plebes\' cars and electricity completely? We all know the hordes can\'t be trusted with \'em.

A flat ban would save a lot of time and needless confusion.

Besides you\'re not allowed out of your house anyhow, so who needs \'em?

:)

Cheers,
James Arthur
 
E

Ed Lee

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 12:10:45 PM UTC-8, dagmarg...@yahoo.com wrote:
On Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 4:53:46 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:

Communism is taking private properties for sharing. Free service is socialism at best.

\'Free\' charging is still taking other people\'s property through taxes, to subsidize mostly richer people\'s electric fun cars.
Same for street lights, roads and free rest stops.

Yes, i am open to charging for charging (for example, 15 cents per kwh). 25 cents for using the bathroom. and 5 cents per minutes when parked at night (when the street lights are on). Or just $1 for entering the rest area.

A pay-to-charge approach that bills for time and kWH would solve your problem of Teslas hogging the stations, and it would result in lots of private people getting interested in building out a charging network.
But not enough interest in sites that are not profitable.

That sounds constructive.

It\'s a lot simpler to just use sale taxes to fund these services.

But that\'s robbing the poor to subsidize the rich -- it\'s not just, and it\'s not fair.
The interstate highways, as well as many other things, are free, unjust and unfair.
 
S

server

Guest
On Sun, 1 Nov 2020 12:17:31 -0800 (PST), dagmargoodboat@yahoo.com
wrote:

On Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 11:09:54 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 05:55:59 -0500, Dean Hoffman <deanhofman@clod.com
wrote:

I took a quick look on the Carvana vehicle sales site. The
cheapest I found was a
2021 Chevy Spark LS hatchback, $10287. The cheapest sedan was a
2020 Mitsubishi Mirage G4 ES, $10,474. The cheapest pickup was a
2020 Dodge Ram 1500 Tradesman, $18,017. A 2020 Tesla Model X
Long Range with 11,300 miles is for sale on Auto Trader for $96588.
California\'s ban on selling new internal combustion driven vehicles
starts in 2035. There must be people thinking about the auto parts store
business. California mechanics might be king in twenty years or so
unless this silly ban is lifted.

The pols here want to force every car to be electric, and are
simultaneously destroying our ability to provide a reliable electric
supply. There is also a trend to banning natural gas in residences and
to not use fossil fuels to make electricity.

Wouldn\'t be easier if Newsome would just go ahead and ban plebes\' cars and electricity completely? We all know the hordes can\'t be trusted with \'em.

A flat ban would save a lot of time and needless confusion.
Certainly. If California bans fossil fuels, it will Save the Planet.

And reduce the cost of gas in Texas.

I wonder if the moving companies will have to use electric trucks to
ship everybody\'s households to Nevada. Teslas have a hard time making
it up the Sierra slope in the winter; the big diesel rigs can barely
crawl up in the right lane.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard
 
S

server

Guest
On Sun, 1 Nov 2020 12:10:39 -0800 (PST), dagmargoodboat@yahoo.com
wrote:

On Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 4:53:46 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:

Communism is taking private properties for sharing. Free service is socialism at best.

\'Free\' charging is still taking other people\'s property through taxes, to subsidize mostly richer people\'s electric fun cars.

Yes, i am open to charging for charging (for example, 15 cents per kwh). 25 cents for using the bathroom. and 5 cents per minutes when parked at night (when the street lights are on). Or just $1 for entering the rest area.

A pay-to-charge approach that bills for time and kWH would solve your problem of Teslas hogging the stations, and it would result in lots of private people getting interested in building out a charging network.
Hogging charging stations? No problem in Truckee.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7i8ufcz1mq6fuuo/Tesla_1.jpg?raw=1

That\'s convenient public parking when Safeway is crowded.




--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard
 
E

Ed Lee

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 12:39:44 PM UTC-8, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Sun, 1 Nov 2020 12:10:39 -0800 (PST), dagmarg...@yahoo.com
wrote:
On Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 4:53:46 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:

Communism is taking private properties for sharing. Free service is socialism at best.

\'Free\' charging is still taking other people\'s property through taxes, to subsidize mostly richer people\'s electric fun cars.

Yes, i am open to charging for charging (for example, 15 cents per kwh). 25 cents for using the bathroom. and 5 cents per minutes when parked at night (when the street lights are on). Or just $1 for entering the rest area.

A pay-to-charge approach that bills for time and kWH would solve your problem of Teslas hogging the stations, and it would result in lots of private people getting interested in building out a charging network.
Hogging charging stations? No problem in Truckee.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7i8ufcz1mq6fuuo/Tesla_1.jpg?raw=1

That\'s convenient public parking when Safeway is crowded.
If only they allow other EVs to plug into Tesla charger, even for a fee.
 
D

Dean Hoffman

Guest
On 10/30/20 6:27 PM, bitrex wrote:

       Maybe places like restaurants and motels can put some charging
stations in.  People use credit cards to pay for time or whatever.
The vehicles would be sitting still
anyhow.

There are a lot of restaurants, grocery stores, hotels, malls, etc. in
my area that do this already. There are dozens of charging stations like
that within 10 miles of me alone.

Problem is the Level 2 chargers take too long, even if they\'re free, and
with the fast chargers there either aren\'t enough cars that support them
on the road, or they\'re charging too much money, or both, so they\'re
rarely used.

The only public chargers I see that are in regular use and sometimes
full-up are ones at the train station, or ones that are right in the
middle of a downtown area.
I\'ve never noticed an EV charger so I looked here:
<https://evstationslocal.com/>
It looks like someone with an EV would do ok traveling
I-80 in Nebraska with the truckers and dopers. Traveling along the
northern or southern borders might be a problem. Someone living
in the southwest corner of the state would probably have to have their own
charger unless he could plug into a regular 110 or 220 volt source.
It\'s like we live in different worlds as far as the charging
stations go.
Trains haul coal or grain here except for Amtrak. It looks
like Amtrak follows the old Highway 6 at first glance. I think
it runs through here 3 times a week.
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 3:35:25 PM UTC-5, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Sun, 1 Nov 2020 12:17:31 -0800 (PST), dagmargoodboat@yahoo.com
wrote:

On Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 11:09:54 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 05:55:59 -0500, Dean Hoffman <deanhofman@clod.com
wrote:

I took a quick look on the Carvana vehicle sales site. The
cheapest I found was a
2021 Chevy Spark LS hatchback, $10287. The cheapest sedan was a
2020 Mitsubishi Mirage G4 ES, $10,474. The cheapest pickup was a
2020 Dodge Ram 1500 Tradesman, $18,017. A 2020 Tesla Model X
Long Range with 11,300 miles is for sale on Auto Trader for $96588.
California\'s ban on selling new internal combustion driven vehicles
starts in 2035. There must be people thinking about the auto parts store
business. California mechanics might be king in twenty years or so
unless this silly ban is lifted.

The pols here want to force every car to be electric, and are
simultaneously destroying our ability to provide a reliable electric
supply. There is also a trend to banning natural gas in residences and
to not use fossil fuels to make electricity.

Wouldn\'t be easier if Newsome would just go ahead and ban plebes\' cars and electricity completely? We all know the hordes can\'t be trusted with \'em..

A flat ban would save a lot of time and needless confusion.

Certainly. If California bans fossil fuels, it will Save the Planet.

And reduce the cost of gas in Texas.

I wonder if the moving companies will have to use electric trucks to
ship everybody\'s households to Nevada. Teslas have a hard time making
it up the Sierra slope in the winter; the big diesel rigs can barely
crawl up in the right lane.
Actually you have that backwards. The Teslas zoom up steep slopes as they have so much more power. The benefits are plenty, but not for Larkin who seems insistent on sticking his head up his ass about it. He won\'t learn the facts. He loves to exaggerate anything negative. He refuses to accept anything positive. I guess he is just afraid of electricity.

Strange.

Danger! 10,000,000 OHMS!!!

I hope that doesn\'t scare him too much.

--

Rick C.

---- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
---- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 3:43:22 PM UTC-5, Ed Lee wrote:
On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 12:39:44 PM UTC-8, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Sun, 1 Nov 2020 12:10:39 -0800 (PST), dagmarg...@yahoo.com
wrote:
On Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 4:53:46 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:

Communism is taking private properties for sharing. Free service is socialism at best.

\'Free\' charging is still taking other people\'s property through taxes, to subsidize mostly richer people\'s electric fun cars.

Yes, i am open to charging for charging (for example, 15 cents per kwh). 25 cents for using the bathroom. and 5 cents per minutes when parked at night (when the street lights are on). Or just $1 for entering the rest area.

A pay-to-charge approach that bills for time and kWH would solve your problem of Teslas hogging the stations, and it would result in lots of private people getting interested in building out a charging network.
Hogging charging stations? No problem in Truckee.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7i8ufcz1mq6fuuo/Tesla_1.jpg?raw=1

That\'s convenient public parking when Safeway is crowded.

If only they allow other EVs to plug into Tesla charger, even for a fee.
Musk has said many, many times that he is happy to open up the charging network to any car makers who are willing to contribute to the investment.

Many people think the Tesla cars are the big selling point. I realize that going forward as the other car makers roll out more and better EVs Tesla won\'t be everyone\'s first choice. But if you want to take your car on trips you will buy a Tesla because it has access to the, by far, best charging network in the US anyway. I hear in Norway the other chargers are pretty well established and even the Teslas have CCS2 sockets.

--

Rick C.

---+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
---+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
S

server

Guest
On Sun, 1 Nov 2020 14:53:13 -0600, Dean Hoffman <deanhofman@clod.com>
wrote:

I\'ve never noticed an EV charger so I looked here:
https://evstationslocal.com/
It looks like someone with an EV would do ok traveling
I-80 in Nebraska with the truckers and dopers. Traveling along the
northern or southern borders might be a problem. Someone living
in the southwest corner of the state would probably have to have their own
charger unless he could plug into a regular 110 or 220 volt source.
It\'s like we live in different worlds as far as the charging
stations go.
Trains haul coal or grain here except for Amtrak. It looks
like Amtrak follows the old Highway 6 at first glance. I think
it runs through here 3 times a week.
In the Sierras, I80 is pretty much the old Lincoln Highway, which in
turn paralleled the path of the Central Pacific railroad.

This is a great book:

https://www.amazon.com/Nothing-Like-World-Transcontinental-1863-1869/dp/0743203178/ref=sr_1_1?crid=29TZ3DLXEFIZ6&dchild=1&keywords=nothing+like+it+in+the+world+by+stephen+ambrose&qid=1604264461&s=books&sprefix=nothing+like%2Caps%2C207&sr=1-1


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard
 
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