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more OT: Smoke in San Francisco...

J

John Larkin

Guest
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk

The cork popped merrily, and Lord Peter rose to his feet.
\"Bunter\", he said, \"I give you a toast. The triumph of Instinct over Reason\"
 
B

Bill Sloman

Guest
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"
Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney
 
J

Jeff Liebermann

Guest
On Wed, 09 Sep 2020 18:41:54 -0700, John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"
The sky is falling (literally). It was very dark in Santa Cruz CA
today.
<https://cfpub.epa.gov/airnow/index.cfm?action=airnow.local_state&stateid=5&mapcenter=0&tabs=0>
Click the \"AQI Loop\" tab.

Animated satellite view of the smoke situation:
<https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/GOES/sector_band.php?sat=G17&sector=psw&band=GEOCOLOR&length=60>
This works only during California daylight hours. It shows an
animated satellite image of the smoke moving over California from NW
to SE.
Band=GeoColor Loop=60 (or higher)
The white stuff is clouds or fog. The pink or beige stuff is smoke
from numerous fires. Notice that we\'re also getting second hand smoke
from fires in Oregon.

A larger view:
<https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/GOES/conus_band.php?sat=G17&band=GEOCOLOR&length=60>

Give it time for all the frames to load. You might get an image that
\"flashes\" during the animation. It\'s caused by missing frames in the
download. Just hit your browser \"refresh\" icon or [F5] on a PC, and
the browser will download any missing or partial frames.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
 
J

Jeff Liebermann

Guest
On Thu, 10 Sep 2020 01:07:28 -0700, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com>
wrote:

https://cfpub.epa.gov/airnow/index.cfm?action=airnow.local_state&stateid=5&mapcenter=0&tabs=0
Click the \"AQI Loop\" tab.
A better air quality map:
<https://gispub.epa.gov/airnow/?xmin=-14335917.52894138&ymin=3979617.440639419&xmax=-12848758.706624988&ymax=4921321.6291127885&clayer=none&mlayer=ozonepm>
Click on \"Loops\" tab.
--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
 
C

Chris

Guest
On 09/10/20 03:49, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.
Sides effects of poor forest management, more like it. California has
always had fires, but years ago, whole teams were employed to keep
the area safe. Ineffective local government and probably corruption
as well...

Chris
 
B

Bill Sloman

Guest
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:26:40 PM UTC+10, Chris wrote:
On 09/10/20 03:49, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.

Sides effects of poor forest management, more like it.
Not in Australia. The most recent fires season was unprecedented, and a Royal Commission into what had gone wrong blamed climate change - the forest had gotten very dry and lots more of the vegetation was dry enough to burn than ever before. We\'ve only got written documentation for about two hundred years, but sedimentary records go back a lot further.

We had a lot of fuel reduction burns before the fire season got under way, so the forests were being managed fairly energetically. It wasn\'t enough.

California has always had fires, but years ago, whole teams were employed to keep
the area safe. Ineffective local government and probably corruption
as well...
And enough climate change to make the whole job quite a bit more difficult than it used to be.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney
 
C

Chris

Guest
On 09/10/20 15:37, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:26:40 PM UTC+10, Chris wrote:
On 09/10/20 03:49, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.

Sides effects of poor forest management, more like it.

Not in Australia. The most recent fires season was unprecedented, and a Royal Commission into what had gone wrong blamed climate change - the forest had gotten very dry and lots more of the vegetation was dry enough to burn than ever before. We\'ve only got written documentation for about two hundred years, but sedimentary records go back a lot further.
Sorry Bill, the discussion was about California, not Oz.

We had a lot of fuel reduction burns before the fire season got under way, so the forests were being managed fairly energetically. It wasn\'t enough.

California has always had fires, but years ago, whole teams were employed to keep
the area safe. Ineffective local government and probably corruption
as well...

And enough climate change to make the whole job quite a bit more difficult than it used to be.
Ok, i\'ll stay with the scientific method and remain skeptical...

Chris
 
J

John Larkin

Guest
On Thu, 10 Sep 2020 15:51:46 +0100, Chris <xxx.syseng.yyy@gfsys.co.uk>
wrote:

On 09/10/20 15:37, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:26:40 PM UTC+10, Chris wrote:
On 09/10/20 03:49, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.

Sides effects of poor forest management, more like it.

Not in Australia. The most recent fires season was unprecedented, and a Royal Commission into what had gone wrong blamed climate change - the forest had gotten very dry and lots more of the vegetation was dry enough to burn than ever before. We\'ve only got written documentation for about two hundred years, but sedimentary records go back a lot further.

Sorry Bill, the discussion was about California, not Oz.
The dynamics is similar. In some places, things grow, die, and
compost. Or are hauled away as lumber. In some climates, everything
that grows eventually burns. Modern fire supression changes the time
scales and magnitudes of the burns. Frequent small fires, suitably
managed, become gigantic fire storms.

Conservation of carbon is real.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk

The cork popped merrily, and Lord Peter rose to his feet.
\"Bunter\", he said, \"I give you a toast. The triumph of Instinct over Reason\"
 
B

Bill Sloman

Guest
On Friday, September 11, 2020 at 1:08:29 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
On Thu, 10 Sep 2020 15:51:46 +0100, Chris <xxx.sys...@gfsys.co.uk
wrote:
On 09/10/20 15:37, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:26:40 PM UTC+10, Chris wrote:
On 09/10/20 03:49, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.

Sides effects of poor forest management, more like it.

Not in Australia. The most recent fires season was unprecedented, and a Royal Commission into what had gone wrong blamed climate change - the forest had gotten very dry and lots more of the vegetation was dry enough to burn than ever before. We\'ve only got written documentation for about two hundred years, but sedimentary records go back a lot further.

Sorry Bill, the discussion was about California, not Oz.
The dynamics is similar. In some places, things grow, die, and
compost. Or are hauled away as lumber. In some climates, everything
that grows eventually burns. Modern fire supression changes the time
scales and magnitudes of the burns. Frequent small fires, suitably
managed, become gigantic fire storms.

Conservation of carbon is real.
Over the entire universe. At the moment we are digging up fossil carbon that had been safely buried for hundreds of millions of years, burning it for fuel, and dumping loads of extra CO2 in the atmosphere. About half of it stays there. Of the rest, some is still dissolving in the oceans, and some is feeding extra plant growth

The atmospheric CO2 level has been around 270 ppm in every interglacial since we started having ice ages, a few million years ago.

When we started measuring it systematically in 1958, it had already got up to 315 ppm. It\'s now at 410 ppm, which is higher than it has been in the past 20 million years. It\'s pushed up the average surface temperature of the planet by 1 degree Kelvin, which has pushed up the vapour pressure of water over the oceans by 6%.

Some plants are getting more water, and more CO2, and growing more flammable stuff like leaves and branches. If this dries out in a dry summer - and climate change can deliver very dry summers to some places - it can burn with some enthusiasm.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney
 
B

Bill Sloman

Guest
On Friday, September 11, 2020 at 12:51:55 AM UTC+10, Chris wrote:
On 09/10/20 15:37, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:26:40 PM UTC+10, Chris wrote:
On 09/10/20 03:49, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.

Sides effects of poor forest management, more like it.

Not in Australia. The most recent fires season was unprecedented, and a Royal Commission into what had gone wrong blamed climate change - the forest had gotten very dry and lots more of the vegetation was dry enough to burn than ever before. We\'ve only got written documentation for about two hundred years, but sedimentary records go back a lot further.
Sorry Bill, the discussion was about California, not Oz.

We had a lot of fuel reduction burns before the fire season got under way, so the forests were being managed fairly energetically. It wasn\'t enough.

California has always had fires, but years ago, whole teams were employed to keep
the area safe. Ineffective local government and probably corruption
as well...

And enough climate change to make the whole job quite a bit more difficult than it used to be.

Ok, i\'ll stay with the scientific method and remain skeptical...
By which you mean that you have been suckered by the fossil carbon extraction industry propaganda, and prefer being spoon-fed with self-serving lies to finding out what the actual science is telling us. Misleading the public is done on an industrial scale these days.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merchants_of_Doubt

John Larkin is addicted to the product, because it comes with added extra flattery.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney
 
F

Flyguy

Guest
On Wednesday, September 9, 2020 at 7:49:06 PM UTC-7, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.

--
SL0W MAN, Sydney
Hey SL0W MAN,

No SL0W MAN, welcome to the effects of DECADES of forest mismanagement and fire suppression, most recently aggravated by envirowacos blocking the removal of dead trees.
 
B

Bill Sloman

Guest
On Friday, September 11, 2020 at 12:44:21 PM UTC+10, Flyguy wrote:
On Wednesday, September 9, 2020 at 7:49:06 PM UTC-7, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.

No, welcome to the effects of DECADES of forest mismanagement and fire suppression, most recently aggravated by envirowacos blocking the removal of dead trees.
Dream on. These may be your preferred explanations for what is going on, but it takes an idiot like you to think that unprecedented fires reflect an unprecedented (and previously un-noticed) level of mismanagement. It\'s taking wishful thinking to absurd levels - and if we wanted absurd idiocy, you would be the obvious source.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydeny
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Wednesday, September 9, 2020 at 10:49:06 PM UTC-4, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.
Sounds like an excellent pairing with COVID. Must be nice to live in San Francisco. Wish I were there.

--

Rick C.

- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 9:26:40 AM UTC-4, Chris wrote:
On 09/10/20 03:49, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.


Sides effects of poor forest management, more like it. California has
always had fires, but years ago, whole teams were employed to keep
the area safe. Ineffective local government and probably corruption
as well...
Yeah, if you don\'t actually understand an issue, better to make up something that appeals to your inner self.

--

Rick C.

+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
F

Fred Bloggs

Guest
On Wednesday, September 9, 2020 at 9:42:11 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk

The cork popped merrily, and Lord Peter rose to his feet.
\"Bunter\", he said, \"I give you a toast. The triumph of Instinct over Reason\"
The destabilized jet stream is what came down and exploded those flames like a furnace bellows. And a destabilized jet stream is a direct consequence of global warming, as has been explained numerous times.


The Leventhal Center for Advanced Urbanism, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology division, estimates that at least 25 percent of Californians now live in what the center calls fire-prone locations.

Jon Keeley, a U.S. Geological Survey research scientist, said that population growth makes wildfires more deadly, and more likely.

“More people on the landscape means more opportunity for a fire during one of these wind events,” he said.

The National Park Service agreed that too many people is the leading cause of wildfires; 85 percent are human-caused.

A Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analysis confirmed that development in wildfire-prone regions has dramatically increased. The report found that between 1990 and 2015 home construction within the perimeter of recent wildfires increased to 286,000 from 177,000.

By 2050, California’s population will exceed an unsustainable 50 million, a 25 percent increase from the current level. Try to imagine the apocalyptic vision of a California with 10 million more people, all of whom will need, to name a few essentials, housing, water, electrical power, transportation and education.

A bunch of other undeniable, scientific, databased statistics about the super-overpopulated mismanaged mess you have there:
https://www.noozhawk.com/article/joe_guzzardi_overpopulation_sparks_california_wildfires_20200830

Your governor is a confused idiot.
 
J

John Larkin

Guest
On Sat, 12 Sep 2020 09:44:01 -0700 (PDT), Fred Bloggs
<bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com> wrote:

On Wednesday, September 9, 2020 at 9:42:11 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk

The cork popped merrily, and Lord Peter rose to his feet.
\"Bunter\", he said, \"I give you a toast. The triumph of Instinct over Reason\"

The destabilized jet stream is what came down and exploded those flames like a furnace bellows. And a destabilized jet stream is a direct consequence of global warming, as has been explained numerous times.
That\'s silly. When the first Spanish arrived here, the natives warned
them about the fires. Plants capture CO2. In California, it returns to
the atmosphere by burning.

The Leventhal Center for Advanced Urbanism, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology division, estimates that at least 25 percent of Californians now live in what the center calls fire-prone locations.
Also silly. It\'s closer to 100%. Always has been.

>Jon Keeley, a U.S. Geological Survey research scientist, said that population growth makes wildfires more deadly, and more likely.

Certainly building death traps like Paradise is criminal. The houses
all burned but the trees didn\'t.

“More people on the landscape means more opportunity for a fire during one of these wind events,” he said.

The National Park Service agreed that too many people is the leading cause of wildfires; 85 percent are human-caused.
The cause doesn\'t matter. There will always be ignition sources,
lately lightning. The fewer the ignition sources and the more
resources available to put fires out, the bigger the uncontrollable
fire storms get. And our airhead governor says the fires are proof of
Climate Change.

Absent forest management, more ignition sources is good.

A Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analysis confirmed that development in wildfire-prone regions has dramatically increased. The report found that between 1990 and 2015 home construction within the perimeter of recent wildfires increased to 286,000 from 177,000.
We have a cabin in the woods, and just spent $3K to have the trees
trimmed and the brush cleaned up. The first floor is made of concrete
blocks. The local powers are brutal about keeping this area safe from
fires, but it\'s expensive.

By 2050, California’s population will exceed an unsustainable 50 million, a 25 percent increase from the current level. Try to imagine the apocalyptic vision of a California with 10 million more people, all of whom will need, to name a few essentials, housing, water, electrical power, transportation and education.
Things don\'t just build up and overnight become a crisis.
Extrapolation is a good way to scare yourself.

A bunch of other undeniable, scientific, databased statistics about the super-overpopulated mismanaged mess you have there:
https://www.noozhawk.com/article/joe_guzzardi_overpopulation_sparks_california_wildfires_20200830

Your governor is a confused idiot.
I\'ve met him. Couldn\'t agree more.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk

The cork popped merrily, and Lord Peter rose to his feet.
\"Bunter\", he said, \"I give you a toast. The triumph of Instinct over Reason\"
 
C

Chris

Guest
On 09/12/20 17:09, Ricketty C wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 9:26:40 AM UTC-4, Chris wrote:
On 09/10/20 03:49, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.


Sides effects of poor forest management, more like it. California has
always had fires, but years ago, whole teams were employed to keep
the area safe. Ineffective local government and probably corruption
as well...

Yeah, if you don\'t actually understand an issue, better to make up something that appeals to your inner self.
Can only say what I read in various places, but did I mention arson as
well ?. Common problem apparently...

Chris
 
C

Chris

Guest
On 09/11/20 03:44, Flyguy wrote:
On Wednesday, September 9, 2020 at 7:49:06 PM UTC-7, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 11:42:11 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"

Welcome to the side effects of climate change. We had that in Sydney at the end of last year.

My wife bought an air-purifier to minimise the number of smoke particles ending up in her lungs.

The local hospitals qot swamped by people who had more serious respiratory problems.

--
SL0W MAN, Sydney

Hey SL0W MAN,

No SL0W MAN, welcome to the effects of DECADES of forest mismanagement and fire suppression, most recently aggravated by envirowacos blocking the removal of dead trees.
Isn\'t that what I said up thread ?. So many people have lost everything
due to decades of mismanagement and a local government that seem
incapable of doing anything to fix the problem. Too much fuel, expect
bigger fires.

Why do so many vote for such idiots ?...

Chris
 
C

Chris

Guest
On 09/12/20 18:33, John Larkin wrote:
On Sat, 12 Sep 2020 09:44:01 -0700 (PDT), Fred Bloggs
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com> wrote:

On Wednesday, September 9, 2020 at 9:42:11 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wyrjcsjemde1gqw/AACymDmZ2Ul7OZwed4XovQL5a?dl=0

As if enough wasn\'t going wrong already. I hear that the ash was
falling like serious snow at times. \"It felt like night until about
4pm.\"


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk

The cork popped merrily, and Lord Peter rose to his feet.
\"Bunter\", he said, \"I give you a toast. The triumph of Instinct over Reason\"

The destabilized jet stream is what came down and exploded those flames like a furnace bellows. And a destabilized jet stream is a direct consequence of global warming, as has been explained numerous times.

That\'s silly. When the first Spanish arrived here, the natives warned
them about the fires. Plants capture CO2. In California, it returns to
the atmosphere by burning.



The Leventhal Center for Advanced Urbanism, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology division, estimates that at least 25 percent of Californians now live in what the center calls fire-prone locations.


Also silly. It\'s closer to 100%. Always has been.

Jon Keeley, a U.S. Geological Survey research scientist, said that population growth makes wildfires more deadly, and more likely.

Certainly building death traps like Paradise is criminal. The houses
all burned but the trees didn\'t.


“More people on the landscape means more opportunity for a fire during one of these wind events,” he said.

The National Park Service agreed that too many people is the leading cause of wildfires; 85 percent are human-caused.

The cause doesn\'t matter. There will always be ignition sources,
lately lightning. The fewer the ignition sources and the more
resources available to put fires out, the bigger the uncontrollable
fire storms get. And our airhead governor says the fires are proof of
Climate Change.

Absent forest management, more ignition sources is good.


A Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analysis confirmed that development in wildfire-prone regions has dramatically increased. The report found that between 1990 and 2015 home construction within the perimeter of recent wildfires increased to 286,000 from 177,000.

We have a cabin in the woods, and just spent $3K to have the trees
trimmed and the brush cleaned up. The first floor is made of concrete
blocks. The local powers are brutal about keeping this area safe from
fires, but it\'s expensive.


By 2050, California’s population will exceed an unsustainable 50 million, a 25 percent increase from the current level. Try to imagine the apocalyptic vision of a California with 10 million more people, all of whom will need, to name a few essentials, housing, water, electrical power, transportation and education.

Things don\'t just build up and overnight become a crisis.
Extrapolation is a good way to scare yourself.


A bunch of other undeniable, scientific, databased statistics about the super-overpopulated mismanaged mess you have there:
https://www.noozhawk.com/article/joe_guzzardi_overpopulation_sparks_california_wildfires_20200830

Your governor is a confused idiot.

I\'ve met him. Couldn\'t agree more.
So why are so many passive in the face of such disaster,rather than
demanding action to solve the problem ?. Let em do it to you and you
have yourself to blame, to a degree...

Chris
 
J

Jan Panteltje

Guest
On a sunny day (Sat, 12 Sep 2020 10:33:09 -0700) it happened John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
<3kvplfhgagbkh66j7pokqrbb84cj2smllv@4ax.com>:

That\'s silly. When the first Spanish arrived here, the natives warned
them about the fires. Plants capture CO2. In California, it returns to
the atmosphere by burning.
https://news.ucsc.edu/2020/09/climate-variability.html
 
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