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\"intelligent\" telephone answering machine...

R

Robert Baer

Guest
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Thanks,
R. Baer
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 3:23:06 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Thanks,
R. Baer
Not sure what you are talking about. Seems a very complicated way to force a dialing robot to listen to robot music. Actually, most of the robocalls I get are from out of state only because my phone number is from out of state. They even pick an exchange local to where my phone number was originally from. So how would this detect a spammer?

The only way to fix the spamming call problem is to force a per call charge of ALL calls like they do if you have the budget service from ma bell. Legislate that originating companies for all calls with US destinations, regardless of origin, pay $0.10 into a fund to fight phone spamming. The providers will make it unaffordable for spammers to robocall and 99% of spam calls will end at the low, low cost of just one thin dime for each of your calls.

--

Rick C.

- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
R

Robert Baer

Guest
Ricketty C wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 3:23:06 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Thanks,
R. Baer

Not sure what you are talking about. Seems a very complicated way to force a dialing robot to listen to robot music. Actually, most of the robocalls I get are from out of state only because my phone number is from out of state. They even pick an exchange local to where my phone number was originally from. So how would this detect a spammer?
* NOT music; never music, machine would emit grating NOISE.
Read what i wrote; all undesired calls are from a town/city and most
disclose state (WA, TX, etc).

The only way to fix the spamming call problem is to force a per call charge of ALL calls like they do if you have the budget service from ma bell. Legislate that originating companies for all calls with US destinations, regardless of origin, pay $0.10 into a fund to fight phone spamming. The providers will make it unaffordable for spammers to robocall and 99% of spam calls will end at the low, low cost of just one thin dime for each of your calls.
* No lawmaker is going to do that.
>
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 6:13:33 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Ricketty C wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 3:23:06 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Thanks,
R. Baer

Not sure what you are talking about. Seems a very complicated way to force a dialing robot to listen to robot music. Actually, most of the robocalls I get are from out of state only because my phone number is from out of state. They even pick an exchange local to where my phone number was originally from. So how would this detect a spammer?
* NOT music; never music, machine would emit grating NOISE.
Read what i wrote; all undesired calls are from a town/city and most
disclose state (WA, TX, etc).
Yes, and these calls are pretty much all from India. What\'s your point???


The only way to fix the spamming call problem is to force a per call charge of ALL calls like they do if you have the budget service from ma bell. Legislate that originating companies for all calls with US destinations, regardless of origin, pay $0.10 into a fund to fight phone spamming. The providers will make it unaffordable for spammers to robocall and 99% of spam calls will end at the low, low cost of just one thin dime for each of your calls.
* No lawmaker is going to do that.
Of course not, for the same reason we are still seeing 800 deaths per day in the US soon to be increasing. Politicians have to do the expedient thing, not the effective thing which is why they are politicians and not corporate leaders.

--

Rick C.

+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
S

Sylvia Else

Guest
On 23-Oct-20 6:22 am, Robert Baer wrote:
  Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

  Wait 7 rings before pickup.

  Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
  Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).
I\'d go for retching sounds myself.

Sylvia.
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 7:16:17 PM UTC-4, Sylvia Else wrote:
On 23-Oct-20 6:22 am, Robert Baer wrote:
  Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

  Wait 7 rings before pickup.

  Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
  Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

I\'d go for retching sounds myself.

Sylvia.
We all have different tastes in music. I\'m not sure exactly what would be found enjoyable or repulsive by a robot. I think my favorite would be a blood curdling scream.

--

Rick C.

-- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
-- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
T

Tom Del Rosso

Guest
Ricketty C wrote:
The only way to fix the spamming call problem is to force a per call
charge of ALL calls like they do if you have the budget service from
ma bell. Legislate that originating companies for all calls with US
destinations, regardless of origin, pay $0.10 into a fund to fight
phone spamming. The providers will make it unaffordable for spammers
to robocall and 99% of spam calls will end at the low, low cost of
just one thin dime for each of your calls.
They won\'t do that because their customers don\'t want it (not for any
silly reason based on a misunderstanding of government functions).

A solution that customers would accept is to offer an option to block
any incoming number that has already been blocked by 10 other customers.
Spammers wouldn\'t pay for new numbers that they could use only a few
times.
 
D

dcaster@krl.org

Guest
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 3:23:06 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Thanks,
R. Baer
look up \" NOROBO \"

Dan
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 7:58:47 PM UTC-4, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
Ricketty C wrote:

The only way to fix the spamming call problem is to force a per call
charge of ALL calls like they do if you have the budget service from
ma bell. Legislate that originating companies for all calls with US
destinations, regardless of origin, pay $0.10 into a fund to fight
phone spamming. The providers will make it unaffordable for spammers
to robocall and 99% of spam calls will end at the low, low cost of
just one thin dime for each of your calls.

They won\'t do that because their customers don\'t want it (not for any
silly reason based on a misunderstanding of government functions).

A solution that customers would accept is to offer an option to block
any incoming number that has already been blocked by 10 other customers.
Spammers wouldn\'t pay for new numbers that they could use only a few
times.
Pay for numbers??? What are you talking about? I answer a lot of these calls to annoy them. I do whatever it takes to keep them on the line. The guys who call me about lowering my interest rate I tell them I have to look for my card, then put the phone on mute. The guys who call to sell me a warranty on my car, I get to the second tier who are the ones that get paid real money. The ones who call to sell me pharmaceuticals, I try to offer them a lower interest rate on their credit cards. No joke, I got the first four digits from a guy once!

So one of the interest rate guys hangs up when I don\'t return with my card. Then he has second thoughts and calls me back. Same area code and exchange, but different number. We get cut off, but I\'ve got this guy hooked bad, so he calls me back a third time and... same area code and exchange, but new number. They don\'t pay for numbers. Their equipment allows them to fake a number just like you can fake a return address on an email.

Lol. The only way to hold anyone responsible is to hold responsible the companies that make this possible. That\'s the ones connecting them with the rest of the world. If you don\'t think people will pay a dime a call to stop spam calls I think you are wrong. For spammers to prosper while doing this they would need ways to get online that they can abandon when the bills come in. If the providers have to eat the bill they will quickly deal with the problem on their end. If they turn into fly by night support for the spammers, the companies connecting them to the rest of the world have to eat an even bigger bill. So on, and so on.

One thing the government is really good at is holding people responsible... for life. Yeah, a dime a call and spam is gone faster than this damn virus!

You could do the same thing with email, $0.001 per email added to your ISP bill (outgoing only of course) and email spam would disappear too... except there is no way to tie it to the companies in the middle. It is too easy for the spammers to hijack computers to send email. Getting a phone connection is not so easy as it all has to go through a phone company somewhere. It\'s like software for the iPhone, locked down tight.

I literally don\'t know anyone who would not jump at the chance of getting rid of spam phone calls.

--

Rick C.

-+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
-+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 9:37:05 PM UTC-4, dca...@krl.org wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 3:23:06 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Thanks,
R. Baer

look up \" NOROBO \"

Dan
Not sure this will work. They seem to key off the calling number and block known numbers. That\'s a small percentage of spam calls. Adding a number that won\'t be used again is of no value.

The only electronic way of blocking them is to have a voice prompt asking the caller to punch a button or two. Like, what is 2 + 11? But how long before the spammers get voice recognition software to defeat that?

A dime a call enforce across the phone network is the only way and even that won\'t stop all calls. Some spammers likely call 1000 people to find one that they can con, but then would hook them for $10,000 for $9,900 profit. Well, maybe only $1,000 for $900 profit.

It\'s funny sometimes when you waste their time they get really pissed off and give you a bunch of shit for it. lol You gotta love the irony. One guy actually wouldn\'t get off the phone so he could keep insulting me and my long dead mother. He was so pissed it had me rolling on the floor laughing..

--

Rick C.

+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 10/22/2020 12:22 PM, Robert Baer wrote:
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if call
is from a town/city.
Caller can claim to be from anywhere they want -- including YOUR home!

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC for
greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz is
least pleasing frequency difference).
Most autodialers are either machines that have synthesized-voice message
delivery agents (who don\'t really \"hear\" anything that you might say -- other
than if you happen to \"press <whatever>\"); or, are autodialing and then
waiting for (and detecting) a live voice -- not an answering machine -- before
connecting you to the next available \"telemarketer\" (even minimum wage jobs
have a cost associated with them so don\'t tie up a telemarketer until you
KNOW there is a \"live party\" on the other end of the line)

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state designation
(seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included) and use look-up
table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one \"word\"
excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?
A smarter scheme is to whitelist the numbers from which you are willing to
accept calls (think about how you\'ll deal with BLOCKED CIDs!). Route all
others to answering machine. Most spam calls will simply abort the call
when they realize a machine has answered. Disable YOUR ringer so you aren\'t
bothered by all of those aborted calls.

[This is how we used to \"screen\" calls; it was highly effective as the
legitimate callers who left messages weren\'t bothered by having to do so.
It\'s also a testament of our unwillingness to let other folks decide when
we should \"drop everything\" to talk to them!]

My new \"voice attendant\" actually interacts (vocally) with the callers
and recognizes voices. So, you can call from some \"foreign\" phone
number and still get through! (and, because it can listen in on EVERY call,
it can continuously improve its voice models for each caller!)
 
M

Martin Brown

Guest
On 22/10/2020 20:22, Robert Baer wrote:
  Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

  Wait 7 rings before pickup.

  Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
  Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).
Why on earth would you want to do this?
Robotic dialers don\'t care what noises you make at them!
  Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.
There are plenty of existing products that will block fake calls based
on CLID or number withheld and some telcos offer a service that
intercepts the call at the exchange level and asks the caller to
identify themselves. WHitelisting for frequent contacts. No name or a
name you don\'t recognise as a contact and the call doesn\'t get through.

I find my answerphone puts most of them off their stride but if I am
expecting an incoming call and a scammer gets through then I play the
answer with dead air trick which is most entertaining. YMMV
  Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.
What capital letters? CLID in the UK is entirely numeric.

>   Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Only a fool.

If you want to confuse an autodialer then answering with total silence
aka dead air is about as good as it gets. It is even funnier if the call
gets put through to a hapless human call handler - scary silent caller
in reverse. They typically go

\"hello\" \"Hello?\" \"HELLO\" \"HELLO!!!\" linedrop


--
Regards,
Martin Brown
 
T

Tom Gardner

Guest
On 23/10/20 08:52, Martin Brown wrote:
There are plenty of existing products that will block fake calls based on CLID
or number withheld and some telcos offer a service that intercepts the call at
the exchange level and asks the caller to identify themselves. WHitelisting for
frequent contacts. No name or a name you don\'t recognise as a contact and the
call doesn\'t get through.
The problem with blocking on whitelists and/or number withheld
is that some vital calls would be blocked. I\'ve even come across
healthcare services that tell you of such problems. Grrr.


I find my answerphone puts most of them off their stride but if I am expecting
an incoming call and a scammer gets through then I play the answer with dead air
trick which is most entertaining. YMMV
I have the bog-standard answerphone message that came with
the phone. The voice is of a woman that I\'d love to meet
and would probably ask for her hand in marriage. For some
reason that seems to deter robocallers from leaving a message.

What\'s the trigger for robocallers to connect with a lukewarm
body at their end?

I suspect they listen for the isolated word \"hello\".


   Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one \"word\"
excluding state if any.

What capital letters? CLID in the UK is entirely numeric.

   Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Only a fool.

If you want to confuse an autodialer then answering with total silence aka dead
air is about as good as it gets. It is even funnier if the call gets put through
to a hapless human call handler - scary silent caller in reverse. They typically go

\"hello\" \"Hello?\"   \"HELLO\"    \"HELLO!!!\" linedrop
If I have time and am bored, I tell them that my father got
up to answer one of their calls, tripped and fell, and died
two weeks later as a complication of a broken hip. That\'s as
true as their spiel.

Alternatively I try to get a salesman to call, provided
they bring some turnips since I want to make some soup.
 
D

dcaster@krl.org

Guest
On Friday, October 23, 2020 at 12:25:04 AM UTC-4, Ricketty C wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 9:37:05 PM UTC-4, dca...@krl.org wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 3:23:06 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Thanks,
R. Baer

look up \" NOROBO \"

Dan

Not sure this will work. They seem to key off the calling number and block known numbers. That\'s a small percentage of spam calls. Adding a number that won\'t be used again is of no value.

The only electronic way of blocking them is to have a voice prompt asking the caller to punch a button or two. Like, what is 2 + 11? But how long before the spammers get voice recognition software to defeat that?

A dime a call enforce across the phone network is the only way and even that won\'t stop all calls. Some spammers likely call 1000 people to find one that they can con, but then would hook them for $10,000 for $9,900 profit.. Well, maybe only $1,000 for $900 profit.

It\'s funny sometimes when you waste their time they get really pissed off and give you a bunch of shit for it. lol You gotta love the irony. One guy actually wouldn\'t get off the phone so he could keep insulting me and my long dead mother. He was so pissed it had me rolling on the floor laughing.

--

Rick C.

+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
To use NOROBO you have to be able to set up remote ringing. And I do not have that. But I think it works. Surely someone here uses it or at least has tried it.

Dan
 
B

Bill Martin

Guest
On 10/23/20 6:05 AM, dcaster@krl.org wrote:
On Friday, October 23, 2020 at 12:25:04 AM UTC-4, Ricketty C wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 9:37:05 PM UTC-4, dca...@krl.org wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 3:23:06 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Thanks,
R. Baer

look up \" NOROBO \"

Dan

Not sure this will work. They seem to key off the calling number and block known numbers. That\'s a small percentage of spam calls. Adding a number that won\'t be used again is of no value.

The only electronic way of blocking them is to have a voice prompt asking the caller to punch a button or two. Like, what is 2 + 11? But how long before the spammers get voice recognition software to defeat that?

A dime a call enforce across the phone network is the only way and even that won\'t stop all calls. Some spammers likely call 1000 people to find one that they can con, but then would hook them for $10,000 for $9,900 profit. Well, maybe only $1,000 for $900 profit.

It\'s funny sometimes when you waste their time they get really pissed off and give you a bunch of shit for it. lol You gotta love the irony. One guy actually wouldn\'t get off the phone so he could keep insulting me and my long dead mother. He was so pissed it had me rolling on the floor laughing.

--

Rick C.

+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

To use NOROBO you have to be able to set up remote ringing. And I do not have that. But I think it works. Surely someone here uses it or at least has tried it.

Dan
It\'s \"NOMOROBO\" and it comes with Cox Cable phone service. It IS really
helpful, but not perfect.
 
D

dcaster@krl.org

Guest
On Friday, October 23, 2020 at 12:40:06 PM UTC-4, Bill Martin wrote:
On 10/23/20 6:05 AM, dcaster@krl.org wrote:
On Friday, October 23, 2020 at 12:25:04 AM UTC-4, Ricketty C wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 9:37:05 PM UTC-4, dca...@krl.org wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 3:23:06 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Thanks,
R. Baer

look up \" NOROBO \"

Dan

Not sure this will work. They seem to key off the calling number and block known numbers. That\'s a small percentage of spam calls. Adding a number that won\'t be used again is of no value.

The only electronic way of blocking them is to have a voice prompt asking the caller to punch a button or two. Like, what is 2 + 11? But how long before the spammers get voice recognition software to defeat that?

A dime a call enforce across the phone network is the only way and even that won\'t stop all calls. Some spammers likely call 1000 people to find one that they can con, but then would hook them for $10,000 for $9,900 profit. Well, maybe only $1,000 for $900 profit.

It\'s funny sometimes when you waste their time they get really pissed off and give you a bunch of shit for it. lol You gotta love the irony. One guy actually wouldn\'t get off the phone so he could keep insulting me and my long dead mother. He was so pissed it had me rolling on the floor laughing.

--

Rick C.

+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

To use NOROBO you have to be able to set up remote ringing. And I do not have that. But I think it works. Surely someone here uses it or at least has tried it.

Dan

It\'s \"NOMOROBO\" and it comes with Cox Cable phone service. It IS really
helpful, but not perfect.
Sorry about not getting the name right. Maybe I meet the same criteria, helpful but not perfect.

Dan
 
R

Robert Baer

Guest
Ricketty C wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 6:13:33 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Ricketty C wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 3:23:06 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Thanks,
R. Baer

Not sure what you are talking about. Seems a very complicated way to force a dialing robot to listen to robot music. Actually, most of the robocalls I get are from out of state only because my phone number is from out of state. They even pick an exchange local to where my phone number was originally from. So how would this detect a spammer?
* NOT music; never music, machine would emit grating NOISE.
Read what i wrote; all undesired calls are from a town/city and most
disclose state (WA, TX, etc).

Yes, and these calls are pretty much all from India. What\'s your point???
* Maybe, and maybe not. Do not care if they come from Mars.
How about that machine?

The only way to fix the spamming call problem is to force a per call charge of ALL calls like they do if you have the budget service from ma bell. Legislate that originating companies for all calls with US destinations, regardless of origin, pay $0.10 into a fund to fight phone spamming. The providers will make it unaffordable for spammers to robocall and 99% of spam calls will end at the low, low cost of just one thin dime for each of your calls.
* No lawmaker is going to do that.

Of course not, for the same reason we are still seeing 800 deaths per day in the US soon to be increasing. Politicians have to do the expedient thing, not the effective thing which is why they are politicians and not corporate leaders.
 
R

Robert Baer

Guest
Sylvia Else wrote:
On 23-Oct-20 6:22 am, Robert Baer wrote:
   Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine
if call is from a town/city.

   Wait 7 rings before pickup.

   Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency
3-4KC for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
   Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand
14Hz is least pleasing frequency difference).

I\'d go for retching sounds myself.
* OOooohh!
Might be as effective, to get caller to quit...

Thanks.

 
R

Robert Baer

Guest
dcaster@krl.org wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 3:23:06 PM UTC-4, Robert Baer wrote:
Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine if
call is from a town/city.

Wait 7 rings before pickup.

Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency 3-4KC
for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand 14Hz
is least pleasing frequency difference).

Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state included)
and use look-up table for verification.

Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Thanks,
R. Baer

look up \" NOROBO \"

Dan

Have been using it for months.
There are a number of callers that are NOT blocked despite DOZENS of
reports.

For a while, it got so bad that i accused them of perpetrating an
outright fraud.
 
R

Robert Baer

Guest
Martin Brown wrote:
On 22/10/2020 20:22, Robert Baer wrote:
   Have need for such a beast; must recognize caller ID and determine
if call is from a town/city.

   Wait 7 rings before pickup.

   Emit loudest noise allowed by Ma Bell specs, primary frequency
3-4KC for greatest effect; perhaps sawtooth for most grating.
   Mixed with second tone about 14Hz above fundamental (understand
14Hz is least pleasing frequency difference).

Why on earth would you want to do this?
Robotic dialers don\'t care what noises you make at them!

   Simple-minded way of town/city determination: extract state
designation (seems 90 percent of these fake callers have state
included) and use look-up table for verification.

There are plenty of existing products that will block fake calls based
on CLID or number withheld
* Please name some..
and some telcos offer a service that
intercepts the call at the exchange level and asks the caller to
identify themselves. WHitelisting for frequent contacts. No name or a
name you don\'t recognise as a contact and the call doesn\'t get through.
* yes, some do; Comcast offers a blocking service using *60, but it has
a 25 call limit that gets filled in a few days - and then is useless.

I find my answerphone puts most of them off their stride but if I am
expecting an incoming call and a scammer gets through then I play the
answer with dead air trick which is most entertaining. YMMV

   Second \"level\" would be: verify all capitalized letters, only one
\"word\" excluding state if any.

What capital letters? CLID in the UK is entirely numeric.

   Anyone willing to take on such a project?

Only a fool.
* then, obviously i was not talking to you.
If you want to confuse an autodialer then answering with total silence
aka dead air is about as good as it gets. It is even funnier if the call
gets put through to a hapless human call handler - scary silent caller
in reverse. They typically go

\"hello\" \"Hello?\"   \"HELLO\"    \"HELLO!!!\" linedrop
 
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