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HEPA filter face mask...

S

Steve Wilson

Guest
If you are worried about covid-19, you can get a powered face mask with a
HEPA filter. There are two on Amazon:

1. BROAD AirPro Mask Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator
with HEPA Filter

CDN$ 94.99

<https://www.amazon.ca/AirPro-Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-
Respirator/dp/B07YWLBVF2/>

2. Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator, Reusable 3 Speeds
Fan Modes Air Purifier with HEPA Filter for Outdoor Sports Housework

CDN$ 69.99 + CDN$ 5.54 shipping

<https://www.amazon.ca/Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-Respirator-
Housework/dp/B08CMPDXXC/>

My girlfriend works in an industry where she has to wear a face mask and
shield all day, sometimes in 14 hr shifts. She says it is very tiring
since the mask impedes the air flow and the shield traps air she has just
exhausted, so she has trouble getting enough oxygen. She is doing
important work so I refrain from asking here to stop.

I got her the BROAD unit and she was amazed. There is a constant flow of
filtered fresh air, and she does not have to expend energy to breathe.

She says she will wear the HEPA mask at work and whenever she goes
shopping.

The BROAD unit has a much longer battery life than the competing unit.

The replacement parts have an exhorbitant price in Canada, but you don\'t
have to rely on BROAD. Nurses use regular masks and simply punch a hole
for the air tube.

BROAD says the HEPA filter should be changed every 500 hours, but my
girlfriend simply washes them and puts the back in service. Other
companies that use HEPA filters say to wash the filter when needed, so it
is a common practise.

HEPA filters are close to 100% effective on virus particles. See

<https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/can-hepa-air-purifiers-capture-
coronavirus/>

<https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/can-air-purifiers-filter-out-the-
coronavirus/>

<https://www.choice.com.au/home-and-living/cooling/air-
purifiers/articles/do-air-purifiers-trap-viruses-and-other-germs>

<https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20170005166/downloads/20170005166.pd
f>


--
Science teaches us to trust. - sw
 
R

rangerssuck

Guest
On Monday, October 26, 2020 at 12:41:02 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote:
If you are worried about covid-19, you can get a powered face mask with a
HEPA filter. There are two on Amazon:

1. BROAD AirPro Mask Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator
with HEPA Filter

CDN$ 94.99

https://www.amazon.ca/AirPro-Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-
Respirator/dp/B07YWLBVF2/

2. Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator, Reusable 3 Speeds
Fan Modes Air Purifier with HEPA Filter for Outdoor Sports Housework

CDN$ 69.99 + CDN$ 5.54 shipping

https://www.amazon.ca/Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-Respirator-
Housework/dp/B08CMPDXXC/

My girlfriend works in an industry where she has to wear a face mask and
shield all day, sometimes in 14 hr shifts. She says it is very tiring
since the mask impedes the air flow and the shield traps air she has just
exhausted, so she has trouble getting enough oxygen. She is doing
important work so I refrain from asking here to stop.

I got her the BROAD unit and she was amazed. There is a constant flow of
filtered fresh air, and she does not have to expend energy to breathe.

She says she will wear the HEPA mask at work and whenever she goes
shopping.

The BROAD unit has a much longer battery life than the competing unit.

The replacement parts have an exhorbitant price in Canada, but you don\'t
have to rely on BROAD. Nurses use regular masks and simply punch a hole
for the air tube.

BROAD says the HEPA filter should be changed every 500 hours, but my
girlfriend simply washes them and puts the back in service. Other
companies that use HEPA filters say to wash the filter when needed, so it
is a common practise.

HEPA filters are close to 100% effective on virus particles. See

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/can-hepa-air-purifiers-capture-
coronavirus/

https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/can-air-purifiers-filter-out-the-
coronavirus/

https://www.choice.com.au/home-and-living/cooling/air-
purifiers/articles/do-air-purifiers-trap-viruses-and-other-germs

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20170005166/downloads/20170005166.pd
f


--
Science teaches us to trust. - sw
One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging. I would have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that. What\'s your experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.
 
L

Lasse Langwadt Christensen

Guest
onsdag den 28. oktober 2020 kl. 23.22.11 UTC+1 skrev Steve Wilson:
rangerssuck <rangerssuck@gmail.com> wrote:

On Monday, October 26, 2020 at 12:41:02 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote:
If you are worried about covid-19, you can get a powered face mask
with a HEPA filter. There are two on Amazon:

1. BROAD AirPro Mask Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator
with HEPA Filter

CDN$ 94.99

https://www.amazon.ca/AirPro-Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-
Respirator/dp/B07YWLBVF2/

2. Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator, Reusable 3
Speeds Fan Modes Air Purifier with HEPA Filter for Outdoor Sports
Housework

CDN$ 69.99 + CDN$ 5.54 shipping

https://www.amazon.ca/Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-Respirator-
Housework/dp/B08CMPDXXC/

My girlfriend works in an industry where she has to wear a face mask
and shield all day, sometimes in 14 hr shifts. She says it is very
tiring since the mask impedes the air flow and the shield traps air
she has just exhausted, so she has trouble getting enough oxygen. She
is doing important work so I refrain from asking here to stop.

I got her the BROAD unit and she was amazed. There is a constant flow
of filtered fresh air, and she does not have to expend energy to
breathe.

She says she will wear the HEPA mask at work and whenever she goes
shopping.

The BROAD unit has a much longer battery life than the competing
unit.

The replacement parts have an exhorbitant price in Canada, but you
don\'t have to rely on BROAD. Nurses use regular masks and simply
punch a hole for the air tube.

BROAD says the HEPA filter should be changed every 500 hours, but my
girlfriend simply washes them and puts the back in service. Other
companies that use HEPA filters say to wash the filter when needed,
so it is a common practise.

HEPA filters are close to 100% effective on virus particles. See

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/can-hepa-air-purifiers-captur
e- coronavirus/

https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/can-air-purifiers-filter-out-the-
coronavirus/

https://www.choice.com.au/home-and-living/cooling/air-
purifiers/articles/do-air-purifiers-trap-viruses-and-other-germs

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20170005166/downloads/20170005166
.pd f


--
Science teaches us to trust. - sw

One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging. I
would have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that. What\'s
your experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.

No idea. My girlfriend does not wear glasses. However she has no problem
with the face shield fogging up.

I don\'t see how there could be a problem with fogging. The mask covers
the nose and mouth. When you exhale, your breath goes out the sides along
with the fresh air from the filter. This would dilute moisture from your
breath and minimize fogging.
and spread your potentially infected breath even more, defeating the main purpose of the masks in most scenarios
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 10/28/2020 2:31 PM, rangerssuck wrote:
One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging. I would
have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that. What\'s your
experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.
The top edge of the mask must be \"fitted\" to the contour of your face.
This is usually accomplished with a semi-rigid metallic strip along the
top edge (though most folks are ignorant of how to fit it).

In a medical environment, an adhesive layer would be in place to
seal that gap (cuz your face\'s contours don\'t fit the \"stretched\"
mask\'s shape).

You should be exhaling through the fabric of the mask, not out the
sides (cheeks), top (eyes) or bottom (chin). I think most of the
over-the-ears surgical masks don\'t fit anywhere snug enough.

Vented N95 masks make this easier -- and are *ineffective* for the
current motivation for masking (medical facilities, here, will
not allow you into the building wearing such a vented mask)

[But, they\'re good if you\'re wearing one to spray paint an item!]
 
S

Steve Wilson

Guest
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

onsdag den 28. oktober 2020 kl. 23.22.11 UTC+1 skrev Steve Wilson:
rangerssuck <rangerssuck@gmail.com> wrote:

On Monday, October 26, 2020 at 12:41:02 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson
wrote:
If you are worried about covid-19, you can get a powered face mask
with a HEPA filter. There are two on Amazon:

1. BROAD AirPro Mask Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying
Respirator with HEPA Filter

CDN$ 94.99

https://www.amazon.ca/AirPro-Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-
Respirator/dp/B07YWLBVF2/

2. Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator, Reusable 3
Speeds Fan Modes Air Purifier with HEPA Filter for Outdoor Sports
Housework

CDN$ 69.99 + CDN$ 5.54 shipping

https://www.amazon.ca/Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-Respirator
- Housework/dp/B08CMPDXXC/

My girlfriend works in an industry where she has to wear a face
mask and shield all day, sometimes in 14 hr shifts. She says it is
very tiring since the mask impedes the air flow and the shield
traps air she has just exhausted, so she has trouble getting
enough oxygen. She is doing important work so I refrain from
asking here to stop.

I got her the BROAD unit and she was amazed. There is a constant
flow of filtered fresh air, and she does not have to expend energy
to breathe.

She says she will wear the HEPA mask at work and whenever she goes
shopping.

The BROAD unit has a much longer battery life than the competing
unit.

The replacement parts have an exhorbitant price in Canada, but you
don\'t have to rely on BROAD. Nurses use regular masks and simply
punch a hole for the air tube.

BROAD says the HEPA filter should be changed every 500 hours, but
my girlfriend simply washes them and puts the back in service.
Other companies that use HEPA filters say to wash the filter when
needed, so it is a common practise.

HEPA filters are close to 100% effective on virus particles. See

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/can-hepa-air-purifiers-cap
tur e- coronavirus/

https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/can-air-purifiers-filter-out-t
he- coronavirus/

https://www.choice.com.au/home-and-living/cooling/air-
purifiers/articles/do-air-purifiers-trap-viruses-and-other-germs

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20170005166/downloads/20170005
166 .pd f


--
Science teaches us to trust. - sw

One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging.
I would have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that.
What\'s your experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.

No idea. My girlfriend does not wear glasses. However she has no
problem with the face shield fogging up.

I don\'t see how there could be a problem with fogging. The mask
covers the nose and mouth. When you exhale, your breath goes out the
sides along with the fresh air from the filter. This would dilute
moisture from your breath and minimize fogging.


and spread your potentially infected breath even more, defeating the
main purpose of the masks in most scenarios
You are not making sense. You have to breathe.

An ordinary mask provides little protection against infection. It mainly
helps protect others against your exhalations. Keeping 6 ft separation
also helps.

If you are wearing a HEPA filter, your chance of being infected is very
much reduced. Therefore you have much less chance of infecting others.



--
Science teaches us to trust. - sw
 
J

John Larkin

Guest
On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 14:31:59 -0700 (PDT), rangerssuck
<rangerssuck@gmail.com> wrote:

On Monday, October 26, 2020 at 12:41:02 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote:
If you are worried about covid-19, you can get a powered face mask with a
HEPA filter. There are two on Amazon:

1. BROAD AirPro Mask Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator
with HEPA Filter

CDN$ 94.99

https://www.amazon.ca/AirPro-Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-
Respirator/dp/B07YWLBVF2/

2. Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator, Reusable 3 Speeds
Fan Modes Air Purifier with HEPA Filter for Outdoor Sports Housework

CDN$ 69.99 + CDN$ 5.54 shipping

https://www.amazon.ca/Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-Respirator-
Housework/dp/B08CMPDXXC/

My girlfriend works in an industry where she has to wear a face mask and
shield all day, sometimes in 14 hr shifts. She says it is very tiring
since the mask impedes the air flow and the shield traps air she has just
exhausted, so she has trouble getting enough oxygen. She is doing
important work so I refrain from asking here to stop.

I got her the BROAD unit and she was amazed. There is a constant flow of
filtered fresh air, and she does not have to expend energy to breathe.

She says she will wear the HEPA mask at work and whenever she goes
shopping.

The BROAD unit has a much longer battery life than the competing unit.

The replacement parts have an exhorbitant price in Canada, but you don\'t
have to rely on BROAD. Nurses use regular masks and simply punch a hole
for the air tube.

BROAD says the HEPA filter should be changed every 500 hours, but my
girlfriend simply washes them and puts the back in service. Other
companies that use HEPA filters say to wash the filter when needed, so it
is a common practise.

HEPA filters are close to 100% effective on virus particles. See

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/can-hepa-air-purifiers-capture-
coronavirus/

https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/can-air-purifiers-filter-out-the-
coronavirus/

https://www.choice.com.au/home-and-living/cooling/air-
purifiers/articles/do-air-purifiers-trap-viruses-and-other-germs

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20170005166/downloads/20170005166.pd
f


--
Science teaches us to trust. - sw

One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging. I would have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that. What\'s your experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.
I just wear the glasses or (rarely, when absolutely mandatory) the
mask.

Wearing both foggs up, and makes one or both slip off my ears.

Masks may not help anyhow.

The little fans in the masks are crazy. The net effect is probably
flow restriction, and certainly looking silly.
 
S

Steve Wilson

Guest
John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

I just wear the glasses or (rarely, when absolutely mandatory) the
mask.

Wearing both foggs up, and makes one or both slip off my ears.

Masks may not help anyhow.

The little fans in the masks are crazy. The net effect is probably
flow restriction, and certainly looking silly.
The BROAD system puts the HEPA filter in a separate box with a supply hose
to the mask. This puts positive pressure inside the mask so you are not
breathing outside air. The effect is a refreshing source of cool, filtered
air free of any viruses. See the previous posts for references.

The BROAD mask has strips along the nose to prevent exhalation upwards that
would fog your glasses.

You should get one.



--
Science teaches us to trust. - sw
 
B

Bill Martin

Guest
On 10/28/20 5:09 PM, Steve Wilson wrote:
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

onsdag den 28. oktober 2020 kl. 23.22.11 UTC+1 skrev Steve Wilson:
rangerssuck <rangerssuck@gmail.com> wrote:

On Monday, October 26, 2020 at 12:41:02 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson
wrote:
If you are worried about covid-19, you can get a powered face mask
with a HEPA filter. There are two on Amazon:

1. BROAD AirPro Mask Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying
Respirator with HEPA Filter

CDN$ 94.99

https://www.amazon.ca/AirPro-Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-
Respirator/dp/B07YWLBVF2/

2. Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator, Reusable 3
Speeds Fan Modes Air Purifier with HEPA Filter for Outdoor Sports
Housework

CDN$ 69.99 + CDN$ 5.54 shipping

https://www.amazon.ca/Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-Respirator
- Housework/dp/B08CMPDXXC/

My girlfriend works in an industry where she has to wear a face
mask and shield all day, sometimes in 14 hr shifts. She says it is
very tiring since the mask impedes the air flow and the shield
traps air she has just exhausted, so she has trouble getting
enough oxygen. She is doing important work so I refrain from
asking here to stop.

I got her the BROAD unit and she was amazed. There is a constant
flow of filtered fresh air, and she does not have to expend energy
to breathe.

She says she will wear the HEPA mask at work and whenever she goes
shopping.

The BROAD unit has a much longer battery life than the competing
unit.

The replacement parts have an exhorbitant price in Canada, but you
don\'t have to rely on BROAD. Nurses use regular masks and simply
punch a hole for the air tube.

BROAD says the HEPA filter should be changed every 500 hours, but
my girlfriend simply washes them and puts the back in service.
Other companies that use HEPA filters say to wash the filter when
needed, so it is a common practise.

HEPA filters are close to 100% effective on virus particles. See

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/can-hepa-air-purifiers-cap
tur e- coronavirus/

https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/can-air-purifiers-filter-out-t
he- coronavirus/

https://www.choice.com.au/home-and-living/cooling/air-
purifiers/articles/do-air-purifiers-trap-viruses-and-other-germs

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20170005166/downloads/20170005
166 .pd f


--
Science teaches us to trust. - sw

One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging.
I would have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that.
What\'s your experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.

No idea. My girlfriend does not wear glasses. However she has no
problem with the face shield fogging up.

I don\'t see how there could be a problem with fogging. The mask
covers the nose and mouth. When you exhale, your breath goes out the
sides along with the fresh air from the filter. This would dilute
moisture from your breath and minimize fogging.


and spread your potentially infected breath even more, defeating the
main purpose of the masks in most scenarios

You are not making sense. You have to breathe.

An ordinary mask provides little protection against infection. It mainly
helps protect others against your exhalations. Keeping 6 ft separation
also helps.

If you are wearing a HEPA filter, your chance of being infected is very
much reduced. Therefore you have much less chance of infecting others.
That may be true, but regulators are not in the thinking business,
regulating is what they do...and the requirement to have exhaust air
filtered is basically to protect the \"other guy\" from the reckless &
stupid. Seen any of those around lately?
 
L

Lasse Langwadt Christensen

Guest
torsdag den 29. oktober 2020 kl. 01.09.14 UTC+1 skrev Steve Wilson:
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

onsdag den 28. oktober 2020 kl. 23.22.11 UTC+1 skrev Steve Wilson:
rangerssuck <rangerssuck@gmail.com> wrote:

On Monday, October 26, 2020 at 12:41:02 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson
wrote:
If you are worried about covid-19, you can get a powered face mask
with a HEPA filter. There are two on Amazon:

1. BROAD AirPro Mask Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying
Respirator with HEPA Filter

CDN$ 94.99

https://www.amazon.ca/AirPro-Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-
Respirator/dp/B07YWLBVF2/

2. Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator, Reusable 3
Speeds Fan Modes Air Purifier with HEPA Filter for Outdoor Sports
Housework

CDN$ 69.99 + CDN$ 5.54 shipping

https://www.amazon.ca/Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-Respirator
- Housework/dp/B08CMPDXXC/

My girlfriend works in an industry where she has to wear a face
mask and shield all day, sometimes in 14 hr shifts. She says it is
very tiring since the mask impedes the air flow and the shield
traps air she has just exhausted, so she has trouble getting
enough oxygen. She is doing important work so I refrain from
asking here to stop.

I got her the BROAD unit and she was amazed. There is a constant
flow of filtered fresh air, and she does not have to expend energy
to breathe.

She says she will wear the HEPA mask at work and whenever she goes
shopping.

The BROAD unit has a much longer battery life than the competing
unit.

The replacement parts have an exhorbitant price in Canada, but you
don\'t have to rely on BROAD. Nurses use regular masks and simply
punch a hole for the air tube.

BROAD says the HEPA filter should be changed every 500 hours, but
my girlfriend simply washes them and puts the back in service.
Other companies that use HEPA filters say to wash the filter when
needed, so it is a common practise.

HEPA filters are close to 100% effective on virus particles. See

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/can-hepa-air-purifiers-cap
tur e- coronavirus/

https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/can-air-purifiers-filter-out-t
he- coronavirus/

https://www.choice.com.au/home-and-living/cooling/air-
purifiers/articles/do-air-purifiers-trap-viruses-and-other-germs

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20170005166/downloads/20170005
166 .pd f


--
Science teaches us to trust. - sw

One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging.
I would have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that.
What\'s your experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.

No idea. My girlfriend does not wear glasses. However she has no
problem with the face shield fogging up.

I don\'t see how there could be a problem with fogging. The mask
covers the nose and mouth. When you exhale, your breath goes out the
sides along with the fresh air from the filter. This would dilute
moisture from your breath and minimize fogging.


and spread your potentially infected breath even more, defeating the
main purpose of the masks in most scenarios

You are not making sense. You have to breathe.

An ordinary mask provides little protection against infection. It mainly
helps protect others against your exhalations. Keeping 6 ft separation
also helps.

If you are wearing a HEPA filter, your chance of being infected is very
much reduced. Therefore you have much less chance of infecting others.
you inhale throught the filter possibly reducing your risk of infection

you exhale past the sides accelerated by the fan possibly increasing the
spread of your possible infection
 
A

amdx

Guest
On 10/28/2020 6:03 PM, Don Y wrote:
On 10/28/2020 2:31 PM, rangerssuck wrote:
One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging. I
would
have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that. What\'s your
experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.

The top edge of the mask must be \"fitted\" to the contour of your face.
This is usually accomplished with a semi-rigid metallic strip along the
top edge (though most folks are ignorant of how to fit it).

In a medical environment, an adhesive layer would be in place to
seal that gap (cuz your face\'s contours don\'t fit the \"stretched\"
mask\'s shape).

You should be exhaling through the fabric of the mask, not out the
sides (cheeks), top (eyes) or bottom (chin).  I think most of the
over-the-ears surgical masks don\'t fit anywhere snug enough.

Vented N95 masks make this easier -- and are *ineffective* for the
current motivation for masking (medical facilities, here, will
not allow you into the building wearing such a vented mask)

[But, they\'re good if you\'re wearing one to spray paint an item!]
If you had a child working on dental patients, would you want one of
these to protect your _child from_ all the patients or

a non positive air flow unit to protect the _patients from your child_?

 Just curious about how you would handle the ethics.

                                                     Mikek


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 10/29/2020 1:38 PM, amdx wrote:
On 10/28/2020 6:03 PM, Don Y wrote:
On 10/28/2020 2:31 PM, rangerssuck wrote:
One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging. I would
have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that. What\'s your
experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.

The top edge of the mask must be \"fitted\" to the contour of your face.
This is usually accomplished with a semi-rigid metallic strip along the
top edge (though most folks are ignorant of how to fit it).

In a medical environment, an adhesive layer would be in place to
seal that gap (cuz your face\'s contours don\'t fit the \"stretched\"
mask\'s shape).

You should be exhaling through the fabric of the mask, not out the
sides (cheeks), top (eyes) or bottom (chin). I think most of the
over-the-ears surgical masks don\'t fit anywhere snug enough.

Vented N95 masks make this easier -- and are *ineffective* for the
current motivation for masking (medical facilities, here, will
not allow you into the building wearing such a vented mask)

[But, they\'re good if you\'re wearing one to spray paint an item!]

If you had a child working on dental patients, would you want one of these to
protect your _child from_ all the patients or

a non positive air flow unit to protect the _patients from your child_?

Just curious about how you would handle the ethics.
You can purchase N95 masks that aren\'t vented. They just make exhalation
more tedious, but not impossible -- esp if you\'re just sitting in (or
over) a chair.

Dentists/hygenists have always been exposed to potentially contagious
patients. Do they know if the person in the chair has *AIDS*? Hepatitis?
etc. I\'ve never had a health care professional \"work on me\" without a
mask and gloves -- TO PROTECT THEMSELVES.

[Note that they\'ve never assumed to offer *me* protective kit, despite
the fact that they would be the most likely vector for exposing me to
a contagion]

My dentist has always had masks and lexan face shields in place for everyone
working on patients. The pandemic has primarily changed \"front office\"
procedures: you wait for your appointment in your vehicle instead of in
the waiting room; the door is sanitized (in and out) after each use; as
is the counter on which you lean to sign your charge receipt; you use your
own pen or they give you a disposable pen (that you can take with you); etc.

The only \"procedural\" change is the absence of aerosol generating procedures
unless absolutely necessary. E.g., prophylaxis is all \"hand scaling\", no
motorized/ultrasonic instruments.

[The changes went into effect in early February -- long before folks were
\"concerned\" with aerosol contagion... his wife is an epidemiologist!]
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Monday, October 26, 2020 at 12:41:02 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote:
If you are worried about covid-19, you can get a powered face mask with a
HEPA filter. There are two on Amazon:

1. BROAD AirPro Mask Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator
with HEPA Filter

CDN$ 94.99

https://www.amazon.ca/AirPro-Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-
Respirator/dp/B07YWLBVF2/

2. Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator, Reusable 3 Speeds
Fan Modes Air Purifier with HEPA Filter for Outdoor Sports Housework

CDN$ 69.99 + CDN$ 5.54 shipping

https://www.amazon.ca/Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-Respirator-
Housework/dp/B08CMPDXXC/

My girlfriend works in an industry where she has to wear a face mask and
shield all day, sometimes in 14 hr shifts. She says it is very tiring
since the mask impedes the air flow and the shield traps air she has just
exhausted, so she has trouble getting enough oxygen. She is doing
important work so I refrain from asking here to stop.

I got her the BROAD unit and she was amazed. There is a constant flow of
filtered fresh air, and she does not have to expend energy to breathe.

She says she will wear the HEPA mask at work and whenever she goes
shopping.

The BROAD unit has a much longer battery life than the competing unit.

The replacement parts have an exhorbitant price in Canada, but you don\'t
have to rely on BROAD. Nurses use regular masks and simply punch a hole
for the air tube.

BROAD says the HEPA filter should be changed every 500 hours, but my
girlfriend simply washes them and puts the back in service. Other
companies that use HEPA filters say to wash the filter when needed, so it
is a common practise.

HEPA filters are close to 100% effective on virus particles. See

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/can-hepa-air-purifiers-capture-
coronavirus/

https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/can-air-purifiers-filter-out-the-
coronavirus/

https://www.choice.com.au/home-and-living/cooling/air-
purifiers/articles/do-air-purifiers-trap-viruses-and-other-germs

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20170005166/downloads/20170005166.pd
f


--
Science teaches us to trust. - sw
You must be a really good guy. What are you doing posting here?

I would have thought they were junk, but obviously not everything that seems opportunistic is so. Good spot.

--

Rick C.

- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Wednesday, October 28, 2020 at 5:32:05 PM UTC-4, rangerssuck wrote:
On Monday, October 26, 2020 at 12:41:02 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote:
If you are worried about covid-19, you can get a powered face mask with a
HEPA filter. There are two on Amazon:

1. BROAD AirPro Mask Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator
with HEPA Filter

CDN$ 94.99

https://www.amazon.ca/AirPro-Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-
Respirator/dp/B07YWLBVF2/

2. Rechargeable Electrical Air Purifying Respirator, Reusable 3 Speeds
Fan Modes Air Purifier with HEPA Filter for Outdoor Sports Housework

CDN$ 69.99 + CDN$ 5.54 shipping

https://www.amazon.ca/Rechargeable-Electrical-Purifying-Respirator-
Housework/dp/B08CMPDXXC/

My girlfriend works in an industry where she has to wear a face mask and
shield all day, sometimes in 14 hr shifts. She says it is very tiring
since the mask impedes the air flow and the shield traps air she has just
exhausted, so she has trouble getting enough oxygen. She is doing
important work so I refrain from asking here to stop.

I got her the BROAD unit and she was amazed. There is a constant flow of
filtered fresh air, and she does not have to expend energy to breathe.

She says she will wear the HEPA mask at work and whenever she goes
shopping.

The BROAD unit has a much longer battery life than the competing unit.

The replacement parts have an exhorbitant price in Canada, but you don\'t
have to rely on BROAD. Nurses use regular masks and simply punch a hole
for the air tube.

BROAD says the HEPA filter should be changed every 500 hours, but my
girlfriend simply washes them and puts the back in service. Other
companies that use HEPA filters say to wash the filter when needed, so it
is a common practise.

HEPA filters are close to 100% effective on virus particles. See

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/can-hepa-air-purifiers-capture-
coronavirus/

https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/can-air-purifiers-filter-out-the-
coronavirus/

https://www.choice.com.au/home-and-living/cooling/air-
purifiers/articles/do-air-purifiers-trap-viruses-and-other-germs

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20170005166/downloads/20170005166.pd
f


--
Science teaches us to trust. - sw

One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging. I would have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that. What\'s your experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.
That\'s not from air hanging around, it\'s from the air slipping around the mask and blowing directly on the glasses. A friend gave me a mask he didn\'t like because he said it was harder to breathe through. I don\'t find that, but it does fog my glasses a LOT more. I don\'t see that it fits any worse, so I\'m guessing the more resistant to flow of the filter means more air slips around my nose and hits my glasses. Or maybe it fits tighter elsewhere, so more air near the glasses.

You get my point. It\'s the exhale directly hitting the glasses that fog.

--

Rick C.

+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Wednesday, October 28, 2020 at 7:04:07 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:
On 10/28/2020 2:31 PM, rangerssuck wrote:
One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging. I would
have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that. What\'s your
experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.

The top edge of the mask must be \"fitted\" to the contour of your face.
This is usually accomplished with a semi-rigid metallic strip along the
top edge (though most folks are ignorant of how to fit it).

In a medical environment, an adhesive layer would be in place to
seal that gap (cuz your face\'s contours don\'t fit the \"stretched\"
mask\'s shape).

You should be exhaling through the fabric of the mask, not out the
sides (cheeks), top (eyes) or bottom (chin). I think most of the
over-the-ears surgical masks don\'t fit anywhere snug enough.

Vented N95 masks make this easier -- and are *ineffective* for the
current motivation for masking (medical facilities, here, will
not allow you into the building wearing such a vented mask)

[But, they\'re good if you\'re wearing one to spray paint an item!]
I think you misunderstand the mask. It is made to protect the wearer. A positive pressure is maintained to prevent inhaling infected air. That\'s what the masks are for in a clinical environment. The presumption is the patient is sick, not the medical staff and the idea is to keep it that way.

--

Rick C.

-- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
-- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 10/28/2020 5:09 PM, Steve Wilson wrote:
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

and spread your potentially infected breath even more, defeating the
main purpose of the masks in most scenarios

You are not making sense. You have to breathe.

An ordinary mask provides little protection against infection. It mainly
helps protect others against your exhalations. Keeping 6 ft separation
also helps.
And keeping your exhalations from other folks is exactly the goal of
masking, in the current situation. I.e., if you confine the viral
particles to the bodies of those infected individuals -- who may not
KNOW they are carriers -- then you\'ve effectively protected everyone
around that party (instead of JUST that party).

In the past, masks were used to protect the medical staff wearing them
(as well as patients on immunosuppressive drugs). What the staff/patient
exhaled was of little concern -- hence the popularity of vented masks
(make exhaling much easier as the breath bypasses the filter fabric).

Now, we are trying to repurpose masks to prevent stuff from LEAVING
the mask wearer. There is little concern for the effectiveness of
the mask at preventing the wearer from inhaling contaminants. I.e.,
the exact opposite of the original use case.

[This is why all sorts of compromise masks are considered (barely) acceptable.
You\'d never consider wearing a bandana to protect YOURSELF from an infectious
agent!]

As medical facilities, here, can impose stricter guidelines than the
state/county/city mandates (\"No shirt, No shoes, No service\"), you find
them universally prohibiting masks that allow unrestricted airflow
on the wearer\'s exhale. The folks in grocery stores, department stores,
etc. aren\'t savvy enough to be aware of the downside of \"substandard\"
face coverings; they just ensure there is SOME covering in place to
comply with the mandates.

I watched a woman -- exhausted from climbing 4 flights of stairs (she
apparently wanted to avoid the closed space of the elevator) -- walk into
a provider\'s office and promptly told to leave due to the vented N95 mask
she was wearing. (didn\'t she see the sign on the door to the building
prohibiting such face coverings??) She returned 10-15 minutes later
wearing an \"acceptable\" face covering -- and was mad at the office
staff for making her navigate those stairs, twice more. :>

If you are wearing a HEPA filter, your chance of being infected is very
much reduced. Therefore you have much less chance of infecting others.
Unless, of course, you are already infected and don\'t yet know it.
Or, are infected later that day when you remove the mask.

Does each of these masks come with a free COVID19 test kit? :>
 
J

Jasen Betts

Guest
On 2020-10-29, amdx <amdx@knology.net> wrote:
On 10/28/2020 6:03 PM, Don Y wrote:
On 10/28/2020 2:31 PM, rangerssuck wrote:
One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging. I
would
have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that. What\'s your
experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.

The top edge of the mask must be \"fitted\" to the contour of your face.
This is usually accomplished with a semi-rigid metallic strip along the
top edge (though most folks are ignorant of how to fit it).

In a medical environment, an adhesive layer would be in place to
seal that gap (cuz your face\'s contours don\'t fit the \"stretched\"
mask\'s shape).

You should be exhaling through the fabric of the mask, not out the
sides (cheeks), top (eyes) or bottom (chin).  I think most of the
over-the-ears surgical masks don\'t fit anywhere snug enough.

Vented N95 masks make this easier -- and are *ineffective* for the
current motivation for masking (medical facilities, here, will
not allow you into the building wearing such a vented mask)

[But, they\'re good if you\'re wearing one to spray paint an item!]

If you had a child working on dental patients, would you want one of
these to protect your _child from_ all the patients or

a non positive air flow unit to protect the _patients from your child_?

 Just curious about how you would handle the ethics.
If you\'ve got a dental clinic open for non emergency work during a
respiratiory tract pandemic and child labour you\'ve aready got worse
ethical problems.

--
Jasen.
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 10/30/2020 2:58 AM, Jasen Betts wrote:
On 2020-10-29, amdx <amdx@knology.net> wrote:
On 10/28/2020 6:03 PM, Don Y wrote:
On 10/28/2020 2:31 PM, rangerssuck wrote:
One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging. I
would
have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that. What\'s your
experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.

The top edge of the mask must be \"fitted\" to the contour of your face.
This is usually accomplished with a semi-rigid metallic strip along the
top edge (though most folks are ignorant of how to fit it).

In a medical environment, an adhesive layer would be in place to
seal that gap (cuz your face\'s contours don\'t fit the \"stretched\"
mask\'s shape).

You should be exhaling through the fabric of the mask, not out the
sides (cheeks), top (eyes) or bottom (chin). I think most of the
over-the-ears surgical masks don\'t fit anywhere snug enough.

Vented N95 masks make this easier -- and are *ineffective* for the
current motivation for masking (medical facilities, here, will
not allow you into the building wearing such a vented mask)

[But, they\'re good if you\'re wearing one to spray paint an item!]

If you had a child working on dental patients, would you want one of
these to protect your _child from_ all the patients or

a non positive air flow unit to protect the _patients from your child_?

Just curious about how you would handle the ethics.

If you\'ve got a dental clinic open for non emergency work during a
respiratiory tract pandemic and child labour you\'ve aready got worse
ethical problems.
I assumed child meant ADULT child (young children don\'t often \"work
on dental patients\").

It\'s been ~9 months, now. How long do you imagine folks can go
without routine dental care? I\'ve been for two cleanings/exams
under these conditions. But, most medical services, here, are
erring on the side of extra precautions instead of playing
free and loose.

The same holds for other medical services; do you stop radiation
therapies? Chemo? Surgeries? Instead, you make intelligent
decisions about what you can gain significant benefit from to
offset potential risks (\"No, Gloria, that boob-job/tummy-tuck can
wait!\").

[Many of our hospitals took a significant financial hit when elective
procedures were suspended.]

What I find amusing is how our goobernor came to the conclusion that
hair/nail salons were \"essential businesses\". Really? Did he think
folks couldn\'t survive without a hair cut or manicure??? It\'s
doubly amusing to see how few people have actually taken advantage
of that \"essential service\" (evidenced by the amount of \"bad hair\"
and \"chipped nail polish\" that you see).

<rolls eyes>
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 10/30/2020 3:22 AM, Don Y wrote:
It\'s been ~9 months, now. How long do you imagine folks can go
without routine dental care? I\'ve been for two cleanings/exams
under these conditions. But, most medical services, here, are
erring on the side of extra precautions instead of playing
free and loose.
For example, I\'ve accompanied several friends for \"doctor\'s visits\"
during this period. I\'m rarely allowed into the *waiting room*
in these offices, despite wearing a mask, etc.

In those where I *can* \"wait inside\" (most have chairs outside their
offices for \"prohibited visitors\"), they\'ll verify my mask, take my
temperature and ensure that I sit \"socially distant\" from other
waiting room occupants.

[Facilities that usually have packed waiting rooms are eerily
empty. E.g., there\'s a couple of firms here that offer diagnostic
services (MRI, CT, PET, XRay, etc.) to the public on referral
from their physicians. These are usually packed and do a brisk
business (you want to keep those expensive pieces of equipment
in use continuously!). Now, you may find yourself alone in
a room with 200 empty chairs!]

Actually being able to accompany friends into the examination room
is usually conditional on their professing the need for my presence
(unable to understand/retain what the practitioner might tell them).
In some cases, they\'ll go so far as to infer that I\'m a brother or
spouse (if the provider makes that mistaken assumption).

I\'ve never been allowed into a TREATMENT room (though wonder if
anyone would have been allowed in same, regardless of pandemic).
 
A

amdx

Guest
On 10/29/2020 5:12 PM, Don Y wrote:
On 10/29/2020 1:38 PM, amdx wrote:
On 10/28/2020 6:03 PM, Don Y wrote:
On 10/28/2020 2:31 PM, rangerssuck wrote:
One Amazon review says that it does not stop glasses from fogging.
I would
have thought that continuous air flow would prevent that. What\'s your
experience?

Foggy glasses are getting to be a real problem for me.

The top edge of the mask must be \"fitted\" to the contour of your face.
This is usually accomplished with a semi-rigid metallic strip along the
top edge (though most folks are ignorant of how to fit it).

In a medical environment, an adhesive layer would be in place to
seal that gap (cuz your face\'s contours don\'t fit the \"stretched\"
mask\'s shape).

You should be exhaling through the fabric of the mask, not out the
sides (cheeks), top (eyes) or bottom (chin).  I think most of the
over-the-ears surgical masks don\'t fit anywhere snug enough.

Vented N95 masks make this easier -- and are *ineffective* for the
current motivation for masking (medical facilities, here, will
not allow you into the building wearing such a vented mask)

[But, they\'re good if you\'re wearing one to spray paint an item!]

If you had a child working on dental patients, would you want one of
these to protect your _child from_ all the patients or

a non positive air flow unit to protect the _patients from your child_?

  Just curious about how you would handle the ethics.

You can purchase N95 masks that aren\'t vented.  They just make exhalation
more tedious, but not impossible -- esp if you\'re just sitting in (or
over) a chair.
I contend they are vented, just not purposely. They vent on the
perimeter of the mask, thus the glasses fogging.

Even if your glasses don\'t fog, I think that just means it leaks elsewhere.


Dentists/hygenists have always been exposed to potentially contagious

patients. Do they know if the person in the chair has *AIDS*?  Hepatitis?
etc.  I\'ve never had a  health care professional \"work on me\" without a
mask and gloves -- TO PROTECT THEMSELVES.
 All true.

The point of my question was, the positive pressure assures that respiration

products will be pushed outside the mask. They will be anyway, but now
with continuous pressure.



--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 
D

Don Y

Guest
On 10/30/2020 5:39 AM, amdx wrote:

Vented N95 masks make this easier -- and are *ineffective* for the
current motivation for masking (medical facilities, here, will
not allow you into the building wearing such a vented mask)

[But, they\'re good if you\'re wearing one to spray paint an item!]

If you had a child working on dental patients, would you want one of these
to protect your _child from_ all the patients or

a non positive air flow unit to protect the _patients from your child_?

Just curious about how you would handle the ethics.

You can purchase N95 masks that aren\'t vented. They just make exhalation
more tedious, but not impossible -- esp if you\'re just sitting in (or
over) a chair.

I contend they are vented, just not purposely. They vent on the perimeter of
the mask, thus the glasses fogging.
You can purchase N95 masks that have a *valve* in the fabric. The valve
closes when you inhale (forcing all of the air to pass through the mask\'s
fabric) and opens when you exhale (making it easier to move air out of your
body -- but, also, undesirable aerosols)

> Even if your glasses don\'t fog, I think that just means it leaks elsewhere.

It is relatively easy to seal the mask around the sides (cheeks) -- if the mask
is wide enough and pulled taut. Likewise, a mask that extends below the chin
will seal well on the bottom. The problem area FOR EXHALING is around the eyes
as the shape of the face in that region doesn\'t lend itself to a conformal fit.

I think that most of the over-the-ears masks are not wide enough nor pull
taut enough to effectively seal ANYWHERE. I see folks\' masks falling down as
they speak. I see large gaps along the sides.

I think the better way to secure the mask to the face is around the back
of the head/neck.

Dentists/hygenists have always been exposed to potentially contagious
patients. Do they know if the person in the chair has *AIDS*? Hepatitis?
etc. I\'ve never had a health care professional \"work on me\" without a
mask and gloves -- TO PROTECT THEMSELVES.

All true.

The point of my question was, the positive pressure assures that respiration
products will be pushed outside the mask. They will be anyway, but now with
continuous pressure.
The cited mask will likely make things worse \"for others\" (it\'s goal is to
protect the *wearer*, not those around him/her). I think one of the reasons
folks are not EAGER to wear masks has to do with the nature of the protection
being afforded to \"the other guy\". If the mask protected YOU, I suspect
folks would be more eager to wear one without peer/legal pressure.
 
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