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Fwd: OT: Items in a metal box are cooler?...

J

John Doe

Guest
Now the poster makes clear it was kidding.

A refrigerator does not accomplish the task of cooling something
(like medicine) a few degrees below room temperature. So it fails
the task...

--
Clive Arthur <cliveta@nowaytoday.co.uk> wrote:

Path: eternal-september.org!reader01.eternal-september.org!.POSTED!not-for-mail
From: Clive Arthur <cliveta@nowaytoday.co.uk
Newsgroups: sci.electronics.design
Subject: Re: Fwd: OT: Items in a metal box are cooler?
Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2020 09:40:03 +0100
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On 06/08/2020 00:52, John Larkin wrote:
On Wed, 5 Aug 2020 22:50:08 +0100, Clive Arthur
cliveta@nowaytoday.co.uk> wrote:

On 05/08/2020 18:29, Corvid wrote:

Metal is cooler than ambient temperature?

Is the temperature inside of a metal box cooler than ambient
temperature?

I need to look. If that is so. Can be used for storing medicine and
maybe other things.


I have a metal box in my kitchen and the temperature inside is
definitely cooler than ambient. I use it for storing things other than
medicine.

If you put a metal box inside a metal box, it would get even colder!
Use that to store ice cream.


No, I have another metal box in the cellar for that, it gets to about
-20C. Not sure what that is in US standard arcane units, but cold
enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey anyway.

--
Cheers
Clive
 
P

Phil Hobbs

Guest
On 2020-08-05 17:50, Clive Arthur wrote:
On 05/08/2020 18:29, Corvid wrote:

Metal is cooler than ambient temperature?

Is the temperature inside of a metal box cooler than ambient
temperature?

I need to look. If that is so. Can be used for storing medicine and
maybe other things.


I have a metal box in my kitchen and the temperature inside is
definitely cooler than ambient.  I use it for storing things other than
medicine.
I have one of those too, and another one where it\'s sometimes much much
warmer than ambient, but weirdly it doesn\'t do it all the time. (More
often in cooler weather, I notice.)

The really mysterious one is this metal cup I\'m drinking from right now.

\"It\'s the greatest invention in the world! It keeps hot things hot and
cold things cold!...how _do_ it know?\"

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
http://hobbs-eo.com
 
J

John Larkin

Guest
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 15:29:51 -0400, Phil Hobbs
<pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

On 2020-08-05 17:50, Clive Arthur wrote:
On 05/08/2020 18:29, Corvid wrote:

Metal is cooler than ambient temperature?

Is the temperature inside of a metal box cooler than ambient
temperature?

I need to look. If that is so. Can be used for storing medicine and
maybe other things.


I have a metal box in my kitchen and the temperature inside is
definitely cooler than ambient.  I use it for storing things other than
medicine.

I have one of those too, and another one where it\'s sometimes much much
warmer than ambient, but weirdly it doesn\'t do it all the time. (More
often in cooler weather, I notice.)

The really mysterious one is this metal cup I\'m drinking from right now.

\"It\'s the greatest invention in the world! It keeps hot things hot and
cold things cold!...how _do_ it know?\"

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
Negative emissivity, of course.
 
J

John Larkin

Guest
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 09:52:12 +0100, Martin Brown
<\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/08/2020 04:15, John Doe wrote:
1. I did not post to this group, a nym-shifting stalker troll did
that.

2. I have already made perfectly clear in follow-up posts that my
post elsewhere was mistaken.

If you were seriously interested in doing something that would work and
does not break the laws of thermodynamics there are now a handful of
metamaterials that are essentially a mirror finish in visible and near
IR and almost black in the thermal band for emitting.

In direct sunlight in a clear blue sky they can be 10C cooler than the
air. 7C is more typical. I wonder how clean you need to keep them.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03911-8

3. There is no need to pollute this thread/group with more netcop
garbage when you are not cognizant enough to see what has
transpired.

That is really funny coming from a self appointed netcop that does
nothing but repost OT threads and headers into this group.

But that is the way of trolls (at least two, from Australia and New
Zealand, in this short subthread)...

You ought to know.
I you built a good reflector (copper bowl, copperclad FR4, something
like that) and put something at the focal point, and point it at the
sky at night, I wonder how cold you could make the thing.

Tall parabolic shape maybe, the opposite of a solar furnace.

This would obviously be a little bit of free energy.
 
L

Lasse Langwadt Christensen

Guest
torsdag den 6. august 2020 kl. 22.57.10 UTC+2 skrev John Larkin:
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 09:52:12 +0100, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/08/2020 04:15, John Doe wrote:
1. I did not post to this group, a nym-shifting stalker troll did
that.

2. I have already made perfectly clear in follow-up posts that my
post elsewhere was mistaken.

If you were seriously interested in doing something that would work and
does not break the laws of thermodynamics there are now a handful of
metamaterials that are essentially a mirror finish in visible and near
IR and almost black in the thermal band for emitting.

In direct sunlight in a clear blue sky they can be 10C cooler than the
air. 7C is more typical. I wonder how clean you need to keep them.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03911-8

3. There is no need to pollute this thread/group with more netcop
garbage when you are not cognizant enough to see what has
transpired.

That is really funny coming from a self appointed netcop that does
nothing but repost OT threads and headers into this group.

But that is the way of trolls (at least two, from Australia and New
Zealand, in this short subthread)...

You ought to know.

I you built a good reflector (copper bowl, copperclad FR4, something
like that) and put something at the focal point, and point it at the
sky at night, I wonder how cold you could make the thing.
I don\'t see how a reflector is going to help make something cold
 
W

whit3rd

Guest
On Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 1:57:10 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

I you built a good reflector (copper bowl, copperclad FR4, something
like that) and put something at the focal point, and point it at the
sky at night, I wonder how cold you could make the thing.
Tnere\'s no need of focus, just a sunshield and insulation will do it.
Works best in vacuum. Ideally, you\'d have several layers of shield
at successively lower temperatures, and site the object near one of Luna\'s
poles.

It has been patented, I believe.
<https://patents.google.com/patent/US3355050A/en>

As far as \'free energy\' goes, it still has the limitation of shedding heat only at the rate set
by its blackness and temperature to the fourth power... so it cools non-hot objects slowly.
 
M

Martin Brown

Guest
On 06/08/2020 21:57, John Larkin wrote:
I you built a good reflector (copper bowl, copperclad FR4, something
like that) and put something at the focal point, and point it at the
sky at night, I wonder how cold you could make the thing.
If you want to try it a shallow polished metal dish just big enough to
hide the ground from another shallow unglazed clay dish on expanded
polystyrene is the way to do it. Thin layer of water in the clay dish.

Egyptian technology that could make ice in the desert on a good clear
night by a combination of wind chill and radiative cooling. They would
have used straw to isolate it from the warm ground.

https://www.realclearscience.com/blog/2018/07/09/how_people_created_ice_in_the_desert_2000_years_ago.html

Tall parabolic shape maybe, the opposite of a solar furnace.

This would obviously be a little bit of free energy.
Observatories these days go out of their way to make the domes stay
neutral at night now that we have air conditioning plant to keep the
interior daytime temperature under control.

In the old days they used the whitest of white paints to keep the solar
heat out but then suffered badly from dome seeing as night progressed
and cold air formed turbulent streams falling in off the dome.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
 
J

John Larkin

Guest
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 14:51:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
wrote:

On Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 1:57:10 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

I you built a good reflector (copper bowl, copperclad FR4, something
like that) and put something at the focal point, and point it at the
sky at night, I wonder how cold you could make the thing.


Tnere\'s no need of focus, just a sunshield and insulation will do it.
Works best in vacuum. Ideally, you\'d have several layers of shield
at successively lower temperatures, and site the object near one of Luna\'s
poles.
The object would need to not see anything warm, like the ground, or a
low-angle peek at the atmosphere where the path through air and clouds
and dust is long. It needs to see just clear space.

Luna would be hotter than deep space. Don\'t let it see the moon.
 
J

John Larkin

Guest
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 14:04:04 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt Christensen
<langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

torsdag den 6. august 2020 kl. 22.57.10 UTC+2 skrev John Larkin:
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 09:52:12 +0100, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/08/2020 04:15, John Doe wrote:
1. I did not post to this group, a nym-shifting stalker troll did
that.

2. I have already made perfectly clear in follow-up posts that my
post elsewhere was mistaken.

If you were seriously interested in doing something that would work and
does not break the laws of thermodynamics there are now a handful of
metamaterials that are essentially a mirror finish in visible and near
IR and almost black in the thermal band for emitting.

In direct sunlight in a clear blue sky they can be 10C cooler than the
air. 7C is more typical. I wonder how clean you need to keep them.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03911-8

3. There is no need to pollute this thread/group with more netcop
garbage when you are not cognizant enough to see what has
transpired.

That is really funny coming from a self appointed netcop that does
nothing but repost OT threads and headers into this group.

But that is the way of trolls (at least two, from Australia and New
Zealand, in this short subthread)...

You ought to know.

I you built a good reflector (copper bowl, copperclad FR4, something
like that) and put something at the focal point, and point it at the
sky at night, I wonder how cold you could make the thing.

I don\'t see how a reflector is going to help make something cold
Space has a radiative temperature of a few K. A blackbody way out in
space will eventually get that cold. On Earth, we\'d need it to think
it\'s in space, namely all that it sees in all directions looks like
space. We wouldn\'t want it to be exposed to anything warm, like the
ground.

A deep gold-plated parabola would be good, aiming at the sky.
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 5:04:10 PM UTC-4, Lasse Langwadt Christensen wrote:
torsdag den 6. august 2020 kl. 22.57.10 UTC+2 skrev John Larkin:
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 09:52:12 +0100, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/08/2020 04:15, John Doe wrote:
1. I did not post to this group, a nym-shifting stalker troll did
that.

2. I have already made perfectly clear in follow-up posts that my
post elsewhere was mistaken.

If you were seriously interested in doing something that would work and
does not break the laws of thermodynamics there are now a handful of
metamaterials that are essentially a mirror finish in visible and near
IR and almost black in the thermal band for emitting.

In direct sunlight in a clear blue sky they can be 10C cooler than the
air. 7C is more typical. I wonder how clean you need to keep them.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03911-8

3. There is no need to pollute this thread/group with more netcop
garbage when you are not cognizant enough to see what has
transpired.

That is really funny coming from a self appointed netcop that does
nothing but repost OT threads and headers into this group.

But that is the way of trolls (at least two, from Australia and New
Zealand, in this short subthread)...

You ought to know.

I you built a good reflector (copper bowl, copperclad FR4, something
like that) and put something at the focal point, and point it at the
sky at night, I wonder how cold you could make the thing.

I don\'t see how a reflector is going to help make something cold
It would be surrounded by the reflection of the sky. The mirror doesn\'t emit much itself so the heat from the object at the focal point would radiate in all directions into space.

I\'ve measured the temperature of space on a clear night and gotten temps around -50C. I think more than once it was so cold the device displayed an error. No wonder North Dakota is so cold. They get lots of clear nights.

--

Rick C.

++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
L

Lasse Langwadt Christensen

Guest
fredag den 7. august 2020 kl. 00.29.12 UTC+2 skrev John Larkin:
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 14:04:04 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt Christensen
langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

torsdag den 6. august 2020 kl. 22.57.10 UTC+2 skrev John Larkin:
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 09:52:12 +0100, Martin Brown
\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/08/2020 04:15, John Doe wrote:
1. I did not post to this group, a nym-shifting stalker troll did
that.

2. I have already made perfectly clear in follow-up posts that my
post elsewhere was mistaken.

If you were seriously interested in doing something that would work and
does not break the laws of thermodynamics there are now a handful of
metamaterials that are essentially a mirror finish in visible and near
IR and almost black in the thermal band for emitting.

In direct sunlight in a clear blue sky they can be 10C cooler than the
air. 7C is more typical. I wonder how clean you need to keep them.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03911-8

3. There is no need to pollute this thread/group with more netcop
garbage when you are not cognizant enough to see what has
transpired.

That is really funny coming from a self appointed netcop that does
nothing but repost OT threads and headers into this group.

But that is the way of trolls (at least two, from Australia and New
Zealand, in this short subthread)...

You ought to know.

I you built a good reflector (copper bowl, copperclad FR4, something
like that) and put something at the focal point, and point it at the
sky at night, I wonder how cold you could make the thing.

I don\'t see how a reflector is going to help make something cold

Space has a radiative temperature of a few K. A blackbody way out in
space will eventually get that cold. On Earth, we\'d need it to think
it\'s in space, namely all that it sees in all directions looks like
space. We wouldn\'t want it to be exposed to anything warm, like the
ground.

A deep gold-plated parabola would be good, aiming at the sky.
but that only takes care of radiation, so unless the thing you are trying
to cool is perfectly insulated like in the vacuum of space ...
 
G

George Herold

Guest
On Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 3:29:58 PM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 2020-08-05 17:50, Clive Arthur wrote:
On 05/08/2020 18:29, Corvid wrote:

Metal is cooler than ambient temperature?

Is the temperature inside of a metal box cooler than ambient
temperature?

I need to look. If that is so. Can be used for storing medicine and
maybe other things.


I have a metal box in my kitchen and the temperature inside is
definitely cooler than ambient.  I use it for storing things other than
medicine.

I have one of those too, and another one where it\'s sometimes much much
warmer than ambient, but weirdly it doesn\'t do it all the time. (More
often in cooler weather, I notice.)

The really mysterious one is this metal cup I\'m drinking from right now.

\"It\'s the greatest invention in the world! It keeps hot things hot and
cold things cold!...how _do_ it know?\"
Thin walled SS is a pretty good metallic insulator.
Silver plated glass (or some such) was the first Dewar. :^)
George H.
Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
http://hobbs-eo.com
 
J

Joe Gwinn

Guest
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 22:54:03 +0100, Martin Brown
<\'\'\'newspam\'\'\'@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

On 06/08/2020 21:57, John Larkin wrote:

I you built a good reflector (copper bowl, copperclad FR4, something
like that) and put something at the focal point, and point it at the
sky at night, I wonder how cold you could make the thing.

If you want to try it a shallow polished metal dish just big enough to
hide the ground from another shallow unglazed clay dish on expanded
polystyrene is the way to do it. Thin layer of water in the clay dish.

Egyptian technology that could make ice in the desert on a good clear
night by a combination of wind chill and radiative cooling. They would
have used straw to isolate it from the warm ground.

https://www.realclearscience.com/blog/2018/07/09/how_people_created_ice_in_the_desert_2000_years_ago.html

Tall parabolic shape maybe, the opposite of a solar furnace.

This would obviously be a little bit of free energy.
I never heard of the Eygptian approach.

At radar frequencies, the temperature of the sky is 50 K (degrees
Kelvin, not Centigrade), but don\'t look at the Sun or the Moon.

For comparison, molecular Nitrogen boils at 77 K.

Joe Gwinn
 
P

Phil Hobbs

Guest
On 2020-08-06 18:45, George Herold wrote:
On Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 3:29:58 PM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 2020-08-05 17:50, Clive Arthur wrote:
On 05/08/2020 18:29, Corvid wrote:

Metal is cooler than ambient temperature?

Is the temperature inside of a metal box cooler than ambient
temperature?

I need to look. If that is so. Can be used for storing medicine and
maybe other things.


I have a metal box in my kitchen and the temperature inside is
definitely cooler than ambient.  I use it for storing things other than
medicine.

I have one of those too, and another one where it\'s sometimes much much
warmer than ambient, but weirdly it doesn\'t do it all the time. (More
often in cooler weather, I notice.)

The really mysterious one is this metal cup I\'m drinking from right now.

\"It\'s the greatest invention in the world! It keeps hot things hot and
cold things cold!...how _do_ it know?\"

Thin walled SS is a pretty good metallic insulator.
Silver plated glass (or some such) was the first Dewar. :^)
George H.
Right, but we\'re all busy teasing \"John Doe\" at the moment, because that
nym desperately deserves it for all those sanctimonious posts about
\"silly trolls\" and so on.

I wonder if anyone\'s mom ever named anyone \"John Doe\". (Or for that
matter, \"Fred Bloggs\" or \"Larry Lunchbucket\" (rough USAian for \"Fred
Bloggs\").)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
 
S

server

Guest
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 21:45:12 -0400, Phil Hobbs
<pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

On 2020-08-06 18:45, George Herold wrote:
On Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 3:29:58 PM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 2020-08-05 17:50, Clive Arthur wrote:
On 05/08/2020 18:29, Corvid wrote:

Metal is cooler than ambient temperature?

Is the temperature inside of a metal box cooler than ambient
temperature?

I need to look. If that is so. Can be used for storing medicine and
maybe other things.


I have a metal box in my kitchen and the temperature inside is
definitely cooler than ambient.  I use it for storing things other than
medicine.

I have one of those too, and another one where it\'s sometimes much much
warmer than ambient, but weirdly it doesn\'t do it all the time. (More
often in cooler weather, I notice.)

The really mysterious one is this metal cup I\'m drinking from right now.

\"It\'s the greatest invention in the world! It keeps hot things hot and
cold things cold!...how _do_ it know?\"

Thin walled SS is a pretty good metallic insulator.
Silver plated glass (or some such) was the first Dewar. :^)
George H.


Right, but we\'re all busy teasing \"John Doe\" at the moment, because that
nym desperately deserves it for all those sanctimonious posts about
\"silly trolls\" and so on.

I wonder if anyone\'s mom ever named anyone \"John Doe\". (Or for that
matter, \"Fred Bloggs\" or \"Larry Lunchbucket\" (rough USAian for \"Fred
Bloggs\").)
He must be a criminal. He seems to spend a lot of time in courts.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard
 
D

Dave Platt

Guest
In article <f9roif17pj0mbrjrj8gku5p5i0tgqth95a@4ax.com>,
John Larkin <xx@yy.com> wrote:
I you built a good reflector (copper bowl, copperclad FR4, something
like that) and put something at the focal point, and point it at the
sky at night, I wonder how cold you could make the thing.

Tall parabolic shape maybe, the opposite of a solar furnace.

This would obviously be a little bit of free energy.
You don\'t need a lot of visual \"gain\" in this situation. All you need
is a reflector below the object which reflects \"dark sky\". It won\'t
matter very much which part of the dark sky you aim towards.

It\'s not like a solar furnace, where you want to ensure that all of
the ray reflections are pretty much parallel (so you can aim them
towards the sun, which isn\'t all that wide a target).

A parabola would work. The reflector doesn\'t even need to use curved
surfaces to work well... a regular-solid shape with a reasonable
number of plane surfaces would be almost as efficient. It would be
important to have the reflector (whatever its shape) be tall enough
that its lip would be above the focus, so that the object in question
couldn\'t \"see\" the ground.

It would work best at high altitudes (thinnest atmosphere and least
haze above it), in still air.

Even without a reflector of this sort, ground-located objects can drop
below freezing (frost) through this effect. The reflector system
would speed this up.
 
R

Ricketty C

Guest
On Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 10:08:59 PM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 21:45:12 -0400, Phil Hobbs
pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:


I wonder if anyone\'s mom ever named anyone \"John Doe\". (Or for that
matter, \"Fred Bloggs\" or \"Larry Lunchbucket\" (rough USAian for \"Fred
Bloggs\").)


He must be a criminal. He seems to spend a lot of time in courts.
I think he turns up in morgues a lot. How can you keep reappearing in the morgue???

--

Rick C.

--- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
--- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
P

Phil Hobbs

Guest
On 2020-08-06 22:08, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 21:45:12 -0400, Phil Hobbs
pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

On 2020-08-06 18:45, George Herold wrote:
On Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 3:29:58 PM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 2020-08-05 17:50, Clive Arthur wrote:
On 05/08/2020 18:29, Corvid wrote:

Metal is cooler than ambient temperature?

Is the temperature inside of a metal box cooler than ambient
temperature?

I need to look. If that is so. Can be used for storing medicine and
maybe other things.


I have a metal box in my kitchen and the temperature inside is
definitely cooler than ambient.  I use it for storing things other than
medicine.

I have one of those too, and another one where it\'s sometimes much much
warmer than ambient, but weirdly it doesn\'t do it all the time. (More
often in cooler weather, I notice.)

The really mysterious one is this metal cup I\'m drinking from right now.

\"It\'s the greatest invention in the world! It keeps hot things hot and
cold things cold!...how _do_ it know?\"

Thin walled SS is a pretty good metallic insulator.
Silver plated glass (or some such) was the first Dewar. :^)
George H.


Right, but we\'re all busy teasing \"John Doe\" at the moment, because that
nym desperately deserves it for all those sanctimonious posts about
\"silly trolls\" and so on.

I wonder if anyone\'s mom ever named anyone \"John Doe\". (Or for that
matter, \"Fred Bloggs\" or \"Larry Lunchbucket\" (rough USAian for \"Fred
Bloggs\").)


He must be a criminal. He seems to spend a lot of time in courts.
Good point. Must be the bad influence of his sister Jane and her
no-good husband Richard Roe.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
 
S

server

Guest
I think he turns up in morgues a lot.
How can you keep reappearing in the >morgue???
Sometimes that gets sorted out:
<https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyndwr_Michael>

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
 
J

John Doe

Guest
1. I did not post to this group, a nym-shifting stalker troll did
that.

2. I have already made perfectly clear in follow-up posts that my
post elsewhere was mistaken.

3. There is no need to pollute this thread/group with more netcop
troll garbage when you are not cognizant enough to see what has
transpired...

--
Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

Path: eternal-september.org!reader01.eternal-september.org!.POSTED!not-for-mail
From: Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net
Newsgroups: sci.electronics.design
Subject: Re: Fwd: OT: Items in a metal box are cooler?
Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2020 21:45:12 -0400
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On 2020-08-06 18:45, George Herold wrote:
On Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 3:29:58 PM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 2020-08-05 17:50, Clive Arthur wrote:
On 05/08/2020 18:29, Corvid wrote:

Metal is cooler than ambient temperature?

Is the temperature inside of a metal box cooler than ambient
temperature?

I need to look. If that is so. Can be used for storing medicine and
maybe other things.


I have a metal box in my kitchen and the temperature inside is
definitely cooler than ambient.¶ÿ I use it for storing things other than
medicine.

I have one of those too, and another one where it\'s sometimes much much
warmer than ambient, but weirdly it doesn\'t do it all the time. (More
often in cooler weather, I notice.)

The really mysterious one is this metal cup I\'m drinking from right now.

\"It\'s the greatest invention in the world! It keeps hot things hot and
cold things cold!...how _do_ it know?\"

Thin walled SS is a pretty good metallic insulator.
Silver plated glass (or some such) was the first Dewar. :^)
George H.


Right, but we\'re all busy teasing \"John Doe\" at the moment, because that
nym desperately deserves it for all those sanctimonious posts about
\"silly trolls\" and so on.

I wonder if anyone\'s mom ever named anyone \"John Doe\". (Or for that
matter, \"Fred Bloggs\" or \"Larry Lunchbucket\" (rough USAian for \"Fred
Bloggs\").)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
 
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