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C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
On Tue, 21 Jul 2020 02:13:56 +0100, Cydrome Leader <presence@mungepanix.com> wrote:

In sci.electronics.basics Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:
On Thu, 16 Jul 2020 08:30:20 +0100, Cydrome Leader <presence@mungepanix.com> wrote:

In sci.electronics.equipment Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:
On Sun, 12 Jul 2020 20:21:10 +0100, Tom Gardner <spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

On 12/07/20 19:01, Pimpom wrote:
On 7/12/2020 11:15 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Fri, 26 Jun 2020 05:23:31 +0100, Cydrome Leader <presence@mungepanix.com
wrote:

In sci.electronics.equipment Pimpom <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote:

My mechanical slide caliper has a resolution of 0.001 inch. This
means that it can display measurements with a precision of 1 mil,

What if your caliper had a resolution of 1 mil +/- 3 counts on the last
digit?
.....<snip>........

In America, what is a \"mill\"? In the UK, it used to mean a thousandth of an
inch, but people use it to mean a millimetre nowadays.


It\'s not a mill. It\'s mil - single l. It means, and has always meant, a
thousandth of an inch. It\'s not an Americanism.

In the UK \"mill\" means millilitre.

If you want to refer to fractions of an inch, then
it is /always/ \"thou\", i.e. thousandths of an inch.

In the UK \"mil/mill\" /never/ means 0.001\".

Yes it does. My neighbour\'s a tradesman (in Scotland) and says
\"mill/mil\" (I don\'t know which as they sound the same in speech) as
shorthand for millimetre. As in \"that kitchen unit is 600 mill wide\".
Since we don\'t use inches for such things in the UK, there\'s no
confusion.

The context there is key too. While I\'d not measure a countertop or
whatever in millimeters, it would make no sense that anything in a kitchen
would be measured thicknesses of paper.

We (in the US) use \"guage\" for wire

Isn\'t that really hard to work out? We use cross sectional area in mm. Which is really easy to imagine. With the added bonus that a higher number is thicker. It\'s also pretty handy as a rough guide that 1 square mm carries 10 amps.

Not really. If you can only count with your fingers you probably aren\'t
building anything impressive to start with. The entire fallacy of \"metric
is easy, base 10, duh\" is just bullshit. Check dimensions of anything
designed by people that don\'t know what fractions are. There are tons of
weird numbers like 13.1mm and so forth. It\'s no different than 1-1/8th
inches.
Yes it ism because the number system works in 10s. So if the measurements do too, it\'s simpler to calculate, especially when you get 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 inches. What\'s 1/4 inch + 1/16? And even worse, how many feet in 197 inches?

and sheet metal.

Seriously? Wow. Why would you not measure a thickness in a unit of distance?

The guage for sheet metal is sort of obnoxious. It will vary by type of
metal as well, if that makes any sense.
It\'s daft for wiring aswell. I can immediately visualise what a 6mm^2 cross section of wire is like, and know how much current it will take.

We also use \"guage\"
for measuring really thin stuff like plastic films. In the last case, it\'s
a completly different unit, but with proper context won\'t confuse anybody.

We use microns.

how many microns thick is your plastic trash bag?
Not enough. They\'ve now made them so thin that everybody ends up tearing them or using two or three layers to stop stuff going through them. Fucking environmentalists.

The last ones I got were
speced on the box as \"0.7 mil\" There\'s no false sense of precision there,
Mil what? Millimeters? Thousands of an inch?

> like with the 610mm countertop or whatever it was.

What\'s wrong with bags in microns? It\'s the correct unit of measurement, as it\'s thinner than a mm. You wouldn\'t drive 17,000 yards, you\'d state it in miles.

Question for the metric woodworkers. Does anybody cut a piece of wood to
317mm or 429mm or other off numbers when building a house or handing a
door or installing a countertop?

Depends if something else is in the way. I\'d always try to use round numbers.

Would round be 320mm and 430mm instead of 317 and 429? Do you split in 5mm
increments too? I\'m really curious about this.
Not sure what you\'re asking here. If I\'m designing something, I\'ll use round numbers. I just built a parrot nestbox. Funnily enough I cut the wood to 30cm, not 25 or 28.
 
C

Cydrome Leader

Guest
In sci.electronics.equipment Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:
On Tue, 21 Jul 2020 02:13:56 +0100, Cydrome Leader <presence@mungepanix.com> wrote:

In sci.electronics.basics Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:
On Thu, 16 Jul 2020 08:30:20 +0100, Cydrome Leader <presence@mungepanix.com> wrote:

In sci.electronics.equipment Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey@military.org.jp> wrote:
On Sun, 12 Jul 2020 20:21:10 +0100, Tom Gardner <spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

On 12/07/20 19:01, Pimpom wrote:
On 7/12/2020 11:15 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Fri, 26 Jun 2020 05:23:31 +0100, Cydrome Leader <presence@mungepanix.com
wrote:

In sci.electronics.equipment Pimpom <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote:

My mechanical slide caliper has a resolution of 0.001 inch. This
means that it can display measurements with a precision of 1 mil,

What if your caliper had a resolution of 1 mil +/- 3 counts on the last
digit?
.....<snip>........

In America, what is a \"mill\"? In the UK, it used to mean a thousandth of an
inch, but people use it to mean a millimetre nowadays.


It\'s not a mill. It\'s mil - single l. It means, and has always meant, a
thousandth of an inch. It\'s not an Americanism.

In the UK \"mill\" means millilitre.

If you want to refer to fractions of an inch, then
it is /always/ \"thou\", i.e. thousandths of an inch.

In the UK \"mil/mill\" /never/ means 0.001\".

Yes it does. My neighbour\'s a tradesman (in Scotland) and says
\"mill/mil\" (I don\'t know which as they sound the same in speech) as
shorthand for millimetre. As in \"that kitchen unit is 600 mill wide\".
Since we don\'t use inches for such things in the UK, there\'s no
confusion.

The context there is key too. While I\'d not measure a countertop or
whatever in millimeters, it would make no sense that anything in a kitchen
would be measured thicknesses of paper.

We (in the US) use \"guage\" for wire

Isn\'t that really hard to work out? We use cross sectional area in mm. Which is really easy to imagine. With the added bonus that a higher number is thicker. It\'s also pretty handy as a rough guide that 1 square mm carries 10 amps.

Not really. If you can only count with your fingers you probably aren\'t
building anything impressive to start with. The entire fallacy of \"metric
is easy, base 10, duh\" is just bullshit. Check dimensions of anything
designed by people that don\'t know what fractions are. There are tons of
weird numbers like 13.1mm and so forth. It\'s no different than 1-1/8th
inches.

Yes it ism because the number system works in 10s. So if the
measurements do too, it\'s simpler to calculate, especially when you get
1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 inches. What\'s 1/4 inch + 1/16? And even
worse, how many feet in 197 inches?
Is this supposed to be some sort of \"hard\" challenge? answer 1 is 5/16\".
answer 2 is 16\'5\". No calculator, no pencil and paper and no real
thinking even needed to solve these. Sorry metric slaves can\'t do basic
match and can only slide commas around between digits.

and sheet metal.

Seriously? Wow. Why would you not measure a thickness in a unit of
distance?

The guage for sheet metal is sort of obnoxious. It will vary by type of
metal as well, if that makes any sense.

It\'s daft for wiring aswell. I can immediately visualise what a 6mm^2
cross section of wire is like, and know how much current it will take.
Wow, you\'re so smart. You think we can\'t visualize 18 or 6 guage wire and
know how much current it can carry?

We also use \"guage\"
for measuring really thin stuff like plastic films. In the last case, it\'s
a completly different unit, but with proper context won\'t confuse anybody.

We use microns.

how many microns thick is your plastic trash bag?

Not enough. They\'ve now made them so thin that everybody ends up
tearing them or using two or three layers to stop stuff going through
them. Fucking environmentalists.
I have to agree here on most bags.

The last ones I got were
speced on the box as \"0.7 mil\" There\'s no false sense of precision there,

Mil what? Millimeters? Thousands of an inch?

like with the 610mm countertop or whatever it was.

What\'s wrong with bags in microns? It\'s the correct unit of measurement, as it\'s thinner than a mm. You wouldn\'t drive 17,000 yards, you\'d state it in miles.

Question for the metric woodworkers. Does anybody cut a piece of wood to
317mm or 429mm or other off numbers when building a house or handing a
door or installing a countertop?

Depends if something else is in the way. I\'d always try to use round
numbers.

Would round be 320mm and 430mm instead of 317 and 429? Do you split in 5mm
increments too? I\'m really curious about this.

Not sure what you\'re asking here. If I\'m designing something, I\'ll use
round numbers. I just built a parrot nestbox. Funnily enough I cut the
wood to 30cm, not 25 or 28.
quick, what\'s 30cm + 3.5mm?
 
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