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Daily confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths, United States...

J

Joe Gwinn

Guest
For world COVID19 data, the following website is very useful. The
plots are very easy to assess, especially the log view. While the US
is shown, all countries are available, as is the raw data.

..<https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/daily-covid-cases-deaths?yScale=log&time=earliest..2020-10-29&country=~USA>

Of course, there are many countries that do not provide reliable data,
so use the necessary dash of salt.

Joe Gwinn
 
B

Bill Sloman

Guest
On Friday, October 30, 2020 at 10:02:16 AM UTC+11, Joe Gwinn wrote:
For world COVID19 data, the following website is very useful. The
plots are very easy to assess, especially the log view. While the US
is shown, all countries are available, as is the raw data.

.<https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/daily-covid-cases-deaths?yScale=log&time=earliest..2020-10-29&country=~USA

Of course, there are many countries that do not provide reliable data,
so use the necessary dash of salt.
I\'ve been posting links to

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

for some months now. It\'s pretty comprehensive, and lets you flip graphs from linear to logarithmic, and display three- and seven-day running averages.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney
 
S

server

Guest
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 19:02:02 -0400, Joe Gwinn <joegwinn@comcast.net>
wrote:

For world COVID19 data, the following website is very useful. The
plots are very easy to assess, especially the log view. While the US
is shown, all countries are available, as is the raw data.

.<https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/daily-covid-cases-deaths?yScale=log&time=earliest..2020-10-29&country=~USA

Of course, there are many countries that do not provide reliable data,
so use the necessary dash of salt.

Joe Gwinn
The second peaks in Europe are amazing. I was speculating if Belguim
would have a second daily-case peak that hit 10x the first one. The
ratio is now over 11:1 and still increasing.

France is at 9x and climbing. Netherlands is almost 9 and climbing. UK
is ugly too.

Some of the ratio can be explained by testing density, but the big
second peaks are very real.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard
 
L

legg

Guest
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 19:02:02 -0400, Joe Gwinn <joegwinn@comcast.net>
wrote:

For world COVID19 data, the following website is very useful. The
plots are very easy to assess, especially the log view. While the US
is shown, all countries are available, as is the raw data.

.<https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/daily-covid-cases-deaths?yScale=log&time=earliest..2020-10-29&country=~USA

Of course, there are many countries that do not provide reliable data,
so use the necessary dash of salt.

Joe Gwinn
On the same site, the following \'data explorer\' web page allows
you to select data types, country(s) and display method, without
changing url/web page.

http://tiny.cc/ul41tz

RL
 
F

Fred Bloggs

Guest
On Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 9:00:21 PM UTC-4, Bill Sloman wrote:
On Friday, October 30, 2020 at 10:02:16 AM UTC+11, Joe Gwinn wrote:
For world COVID19 data, the following website is very useful. The
plots are very easy to assess, especially the log view. While the US
is shown, all countries are available, as is the raw data.

.<https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/daily-covid-cases-deaths?yScale=log&time=earliest..2020-10-29&country=~USA

Of course, there are many countries that do not provide reliable data,
so use the necessary dash of salt.
I\'ve been posting links to

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

for some months now. It\'s pretty comprehensive, and lets you flip graphs from linear to logarithmic, and display three- and seven-day running averages.
And do you know why \"running\" averages might be useful?

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney
 
J

Joe Gwinn

Guest
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 19:33:31 -0700, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 19:02:02 -0400, Joe Gwinn <joegwinn@comcast.net
wrote:

For world COVID19 data, the following website is very useful. The
plots are very easy to assess, especially the log view. While the US
is shown, all countries are available, as is the raw data.

.<https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/daily-covid-cases-deaths?yScale=log&time=earliest..2020-10-29&country=~USA

Of course, there are many countries that do not provide reliable data,
so use the necessary dash of salt.

Joe Gwinn

The second peaks in Europe are amazing. I was speculating if Belguim
would have a second daily-case peak that hit 10x the first one. The
ratio is now over 11:1 and still increasing.

France is at 9x and climbing. Netherlands is almost 9 and climbing. UK
is ugly too.

Some of the ratio can be explained by testing density, but the big
second peaks are very real.
What we are seeing looks to me like the combination of differences in
vulnerability (Italians and Spanish seem most vulnerable, for unknown
reasons, although the genome locus that causes this is known), and the
fact that lockdowns only stop the clock for a while, only to resume
when the lockdown is relaxed.

In most places, the current wave has as many or more case, but far
fewer deaths per case than earlier waves, probably because of
depletion of the susceptable.

Joe Gwinn
 
J

Joe Gwinn

Guest
On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 09:03:16 -0400, legg <legg@nospam.magma.ca> wrote:

On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 19:02:02 -0400, Joe Gwinn <joegwinn@comcast.net
wrote:

For world COVID19 data, the following website is very useful. The
plots are very easy to assess, especially the log view. While the US
is shown, all countries are available, as is the raw data.

.<https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/daily-covid-cases-deaths?yScale=log&time=earliest..2020-10-29&country=~USA

Of course, there are many countries that do not provide reliable data,
so use the necessary dash of salt.

Joe Gwinn

On the same site, the following \'data explorer\' web page allows
you to select data types, country(s) and display method, without
changing url/web page.

http://tiny.cc/ul41tz
Expanded:
<https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-data-explorer?tab=map&zoomToSelection=true&country=GBR~USA~ESP~ITA~BRA~IND~KOR&region=World&casesMetric=true&interval=total&hideControls=true&perCapita=true&smoothing=0&pickerMetric=location&pickerSort=asc>

Yes, that\'s quite useful too.

Joe Gwinn
 
D

Dave Platt

Guest
In article <6vtopfl8dda19noo1sumhdoe9tqiobk84a@4ax.com>,
Joe Gwinn <joegwinn@comcast.net> wrote:

In most places, the current wave has as many or more case, but far
fewer deaths per case than earlier waves, probably because of
depletion of the susceptable.
That may very well be one factor.

I saw an article recently which said that in some areas, the
post-hospital-admission death rate had dropped from 20-some percent
down to between 7% and 8%. Three factors were suggested as being
involved:

- A higher percentage of those being hospitalized are young (and
hence less likely to progress to severe illness). This may tie in
to your \"depletion of the susceptible\", as well as the reported
tendency of the young to pay less attention to mitigation (social
distancing, mask wearing).

- Better treatment, and a better understanding of which patients are
going to need which sorts of interventions in order to recover.
Just the use of dexamathasone on the seriously ill seems to have
made a significant difference.

- Quite possibly, the common use of masks. Although consumer-
grade masks don\'t block all incoming virus particles, they may
be _reducing_ the amount of inhaled virus enough to make a
real difference. There\'s apparently evidence accumulating to
indicate that the amount of virus one inhales, may significantly
influence how ill one becomes - a heavier initial viral load leading
to a more rapid infection and thus less time for the immunue system
to react.
 
J

John Larkin

Guest
On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 16:34:58 -0400, Joe Gwinn <joegwinn@comcast.net>
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 19:33:31 -0700, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 19:02:02 -0400, Joe Gwinn <joegwinn@comcast.net
wrote:

For world COVID19 data, the following website is very useful. The
plots are very easy to assess, especially the log view. While the US
is shown, all countries are available, as is the raw data.

.<https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/daily-covid-cases-deaths?yScale=log&time=earliest..2020-10-29&country=~USA

Of course, there are many countries that do not provide reliable data,
so use the necessary dash of salt.

Joe Gwinn

The second peaks in Europe are amazing. I was speculating if Belguim
would have a second daily-case peak that hit 10x the first one. The
ratio is now over 11:1 and still increasing.

France is at 9x and climbing. Netherlands is almost 9 and climbing. UK
is ugly too.

Some of the ratio can be explained by testing density, but the big
second peaks are very real.

What we are seeing looks to me like the combination of differences in
vulnerability (Italians and Spanish seem most vulnerable, for unknown
reasons, although the genome locus that causes this is known), and the
fact that lockdowns only stop the clock for a while, only to resume
when the lockdown is relaxed.
Probably so. Lockdowns had multiple bad side effects.

In most places, the current wave has as many or more case, but far
fewer deaths per case than earlier waves, probably because of
depletion of the susceptable.

Joe Gwinn
Depletion suggests that the virus was very widespread in the first
peak and took out most of the weak people, which is contrary to most
theory, and also conflicts with having a big second peak.

Lots of countries had a big spike, a long low plateau, and then a
second, sudden giant peak that\'s still climbing. They should peak and
drop off soon, like the first one. A couple already have.

Possibly the virus has genetically drifted to be more infectuous and
less deadly. They tend to do that.
 
W

whit3rd

Guest
On Friday, October 30, 2020 at 2:39:06 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 16:34:58 -0400, Joe Gwinn <joeg...@comcast.net
wrote:

What we are seeing looks to me like the combination of differences in
vulnerability (Italians and Spanish seem most vulnerable, for unknown
reasons, although the genome locus that causes this is known), and the
fact that lockdowns only stop the clock for a while, only to resume
when the lockdown is relaxed.

Probably so. Lockdowns had multiple bad side effects.
Also multiple good side effects (flu is down this year, air quality is better), as well as a good
main effect.

Lockdowns do NOT stop the clock, they turn positive growth into negative
growth (diminution), which one can learn from studying the bumps.

That\'s why the curves peak and turn down.
 
B

bitrex

Guest
On 10/30/2020 6:50 PM, whit3rd wrote:
On Friday, October 30, 2020 at 2:39:06 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 16:34:58 -0400, Joe Gwinn <joeg...@comcast.net
wrote:

What we are seeing looks to me like the combination of differences in
vulnerability (Italians and Spanish seem most vulnerable, for unknown
reasons, although the genome locus that causes this is known), and the
fact that lockdowns only stop the clock for a while, only to resume
when the lockdown is relaxed.

Probably so. Lockdowns had multiple bad side effects.

Also multiple good side effects (flu is down this year, air quality is better), as well as a good
main effect.

Lockdowns do NOT stop the clock, they turn positive growth into negative
growth (diminution), which one can learn from studying the bumps.

That\'s why the curves peak and turn down.
Yeah the air quality may be better but the trees and grasses around here
went nuts, worst spring pollen season ever.
 
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