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Comcast Digital Cable Frequencies Chart

Guest
Hi,

I did a Google search for Comcast digital cable frequencies spectrum chart
("comcast digital cable"+"frequecies spectrum" and I tried "comcast digital
cable"+"frequencies chart"), but it did not find what I was looking for.

I am looking for a chart listing the frequencies used by each channel
number like the one I have from years ago when cable was analog.

I am willing to pay a small fee for this chart.

Does anyone know a web site that has this information?

Thank You in advance, John
 
D

Don Bruder

Guest
In article <onjeeaho3jktmmcomjmvtibmieuvonogpb@4ax.com>,
jaugustine@verizon.net wrote:

Hi,

I did a Google search for Comcast digital cable frequencies spectrum chart
("comcast digital cable"+"frequecies spectrum" and I tried "comcast digital
cable"+"frequencies chart"), but it did not find what I was looking for.

I am looking for a chart listing the frequencies used by each channel
number like the one I have from years ago when cable was analog.

I am willing to pay a small fee for this chart.

Does anyone know a web site that has this information?

Thank You in advance, John
In a nutshell:
You're not going to find such a thing, since it doesn't exist.

More detailed explanation:
With digital cable, trying to use a "channel equals frequency" scheme is
wasted effort and resources. Digital cable is more like the internet
than a TV broadcast, in that it's essentially just a stream of bits
being pumped through a pipe. In its simplest-to-explain form (which
ignores a whole bunch of technical details for the sake of brevity) you
just dump the whole mess of programming - every channel the system
offers - down the pipe as a stream consisting of packets of bits. The
cable box sits there watching the stream of packets going by, and based
on what "channel" you're "tuned to", grabs the packets it needs to
reconstruct the video and audio for that "channel" out of the raw
stream, and sends it to whatever output stage is appropriate. Any
packets that don't pertain to the "channel" in question are simply
ignored.

--
Security provided by Mssrs Smith and/or Wesson. Brought to you by the letter Q
 
K

Kevin McMurtrie

Guest
In article <onjeeaho3jktmmcomjmvtibmieuvonogpb@4ax.com>,
jaugustine@verizon.net wrote:

Hi,

I did a Google search for Comcast digital cable frequencies spectrum chart
("comcast digital cable"+"frequecies spectrum" and I tried "comcast digital
cable"+"frequencies chart"), but it did not find what I was looking for.

I am looking for a chart listing the frequencies used by each channel
number like the one I have from years ago when cable was analog.

I am willing to pay a small fee for this chart.

Does anyone know a web site that has this information?

Thank You in advance, John
DOCSIS is almost every frequency that coax can carry, sliced up into
bands. MHz to GHz. TV stations are digitally encoded in the data.

--
I will not see posts from astraweb, theremailer, dizum, or google
because they host Usenet flooders.
 

Guest
In a nutshell:
You're not going to find such a thing, since it doesn't exist.

More detailed explanation:
With digital cable, trying to use a "channel equals frequency" scheme is
wasted effort and resources. Digital cable is more like the internet
than a TV broadcast, in that it's essentially just a stream of bits
being pumped through a pipe. In its simplest-to-explain form (which
ignores a whole bunch of technical details for the sake of brevity) you
just dump the whole mess of programming - every channel the system
offers - down the pipe as a stream consisting of packets of bits. The
cable box sits there watching the stream of packets going by, and based
on what "channel" you're "tuned to", grabs the packets it needs to
reconstruct the video and audio for that "channel" out of the raw
stream, and sends it to whatever output stage is appropriate. Any
packets that don't pertain to the "channel" in question are simply
ignored.
Hi Don,

Digital broadcasts over the air uses specific frequencies. However,
cable uses coax instead of "air". Those digital "packets" require RF
to travel over the air or on cable.

I injected a 276Mhz signal into the cable and it "knocked out"
those ANNOYING ads/promos you see when you use the "On Demand"
feature to see a list of movies, TV shows, music videos, etc. With
the ads "blocked", I was able to select and view (on demand) a music
video because it uses a different frequency.

John
 
M

Michael A. Terrell

Guest
jaugustine@verizon.net wrote:
In a nutshell:
You're not going to find such a thing, since it doesn't exist.

More detailed explanation:
With digital cable, trying to use a "channel equals frequency" scheme is
wasted effort and resources. Digital cable is more like the internet
than a TV broadcast, in that it's essentially just a stream of bits
being pumped through a pipe. In its simplest-to-explain form (which
ignores a whole bunch of technical details for the sake of brevity) you
just dump the whole mess of programming - every channel the system
offers - down the pipe as a stream consisting of packets of bits. The
cable box sits there watching the stream of packets going by, and based
on what "channel" you're "tuned to", grabs the packets it needs to
reconstruct the video and audio for that "channel" out of the raw
stream, and sends it to whatever output stage is appropriate. Any
packets that don't pertain to the "channel" in question are simply
ignored.

Hi Don,

Digital broadcasts over the air uses specific frequencies. However,
cable uses coax instead of "air". Those digital "packets" require RF
to travel over the air or on cable.

I injected a 276Mhz signal into the cable and it "knocked out"
those ANNOYING ads/promos you see when you use the "On Demand"
feature to see a list of movies, TV shows, music videos, etc. With
the ads "blocked", I was able to select and view (on demand) a music
video because it uses a different frequency.
Over the air is 8VSB, and cable uses QAM encoding. Here is a link to
a PDF file explaining the differences on page 54.

<http://www.blondertongue.com/UserFiles/file/Marketing%20Literature/2014_BRG_lo-res.pdf>


--
Anyone wanting to run for any political office in the US should have to
have a DD214, and a honorable discharge.
 

Guest
Hi Don,

Digital broadcasts over the air uses specific frequencies. However,
cable uses coax instead of "air". Those digital "packets" require RF
to travel over the air or on cable.

I injected a 276Mhz signal into the cable and it "knocked out"
those ANNOYING ads/promos you see when you use the "On Demand"
feature to see a list of movies, TV shows, music videos, etc. With
the ads "blocked", I was able to select and view (on demand) a music
video because it uses a different frequency.


Over the air is 8VSB, and cable uses QAM encoding. Here is a link to
a PDF file explaining the differences on page 54.

http://www.blondertongue.com/UserFiles/file/Marketing%20Literature/2014_BRG_lo-res.pdf
Hi,

I was aware that the "format" is different on cable compared to over the
air, but the point I was trying to make is that each channel uses a different
frequency on cable, just as it does over the air.

John
 
M

Michael A. Terrell

Guest
jaugustine@verizon.net wrote:
Hi Don,

Digital broadcasts over the air uses specific frequencies. However,
cable uses coax instead of "air". Those digital "packets" require RF
to travel over the air or on cable.

I injected a 276Mhz signal into the cable and it "knocked out"
those ANNOYING ads/promos you see when you use the "On Demand"
feature to see a list of movies, TV shows, music videos, etc. With
the ads "blocked", I was able to select and view (on demand) a music
video because it uses a different frequency.


Over the air is 8VSB, and cable uses QAM encoding. Here is a link to
a PDF file explaining the differences on page 54.

http://www.blondertongue.com/UserFiles/file/Marketing%20Literature/2014_BRG_lo-res.pdf

Hi,

I was aware that the "format" is different on cable compared to over the
air, but the point I was trying to make is that each channel uses a different
frequency on cable, just as it does over the air.
Did you read the material?

--
Anyone wanting to run for any political office in the US should have to
have a DD214, and a honorable discharge.
 

Guest
On Friday, February 20, 2015 at 7:16:14 AM UTC-8, jaugu...@verizon.net wrote:
Hi,

I did a Google search for Comcast digital cable frequencies spectrum chart
("comcast digital cable"+"frequecies spectrum" and I tried "comcast digital
cable"+"frequencies chart"), but it did not find what I was looking for.

I am looking for a chart listing the frequencies used by each channel
number like the one I have from years ago when cable was analog.

I am willing to pay a small fee for this chart.

Does anyone know a web site that has this information?

Thank You in advance, John
 

Guest
curious and amazed at how blatant people are about having, wanting or knowing this info with the full knowledge that you are trying to gain access to in and out channels used for sextortion and cat fishing of minors including stalking children and looking at child porn.

That would be the only necessity for raw data details on cable frequency charts especially Comcast.

Pathetic

On Friday, February 20, 2015 at 9:25:03 PM UTC-8, Kevin McMurtrie wrote:
In article <onjeeaho3jktmmcomjmvtibmieuvonogpb@4ax.com>,
jaugustine@verizon.net wrote:

Hi,

I did a Google search for Comcast digital cable frequencies spectrum chart
("comcast digital cable"+"frequecies spectrum" and I tried "comcast digital
cable"+"frequencies chart"), but it did not find what I was looking for.

I am looking for a chart listing the frequencies used by each channel
number like the one I have from years ago when cable was analog.

I am willing to pay a small fee for this chart.

Does anyone know a web site that has this information?

Thank You in advance, John

DOCSIS is almost every frequency that coax can carry, sliced up into
bands. MHz to GHz. TV stations are digitally encoded in the data.

--
I will not see posts from astraweb, theremailer, dizum, or google
because they host Usenet flooders.
 
C

Commander Kinsey

Guest
So Comcast only transmit dodgy stuff?! Pretty sure there are normal channels in there too.


On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 22:04:31 +0100, <annettecsr10189@gmail.com> wrote:

curious and amazed at how blatant people are about having, wanting or knowing this info with the full knowledge that you are trying to gain access to in and out channels used for sextortion and cat fishing of minors including stalking children and looking at child porn.

That would be the only necessity for raw data details on cable frequency charts especially Comcast.

Pathetic

On Friday, February 20, 2015 at 9:25:03 PM UTC-8, Kevin McMurtrie wrote:
In article <onjeeaho3jktmmcomjmvtibmieuvonogpb@4ax.com>,
jaugustine@verizon.net wrote:

Hi,

I did a Google search for Comcast digital cable frequencies spectrum chart
("comcast digital cable"+"frequecies spectrum" and I tried "comcast digital
cable"+"frequencies chart"), but it did not find what I was looking for.

I am looking for a chart listing the frequencies used by each channel
number like the one I have from years ago when cable was analog.

I am willing to pay a small fee for this chart.

Does anyone know a web site that has this information?

Thank You in advance, John

DOCSIS is almost every frequency that coax can carry, sliced up into
bands. MHz to GHz. TV stations are digitally encoded in the data.

--
I will not see posts from astraweb, theremailer, dizum, or google
because they host Usenet flooders.
 
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