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Chip with simple program for Toy

J

Jamie

Guest
look at PIC chips.
www.microchip.com
they have very small 8 pin types that would be
more than enough for that.
you need a programmer from them to write the
code in it.. its not hard to do and its fun to
learn, after you see what can be done with these
programmable integrated chips you will wonder why
you never looked there before!


Berrie wrote:
Dear Reader,

I'm looking for information (quotation for production quantity's)
for a little chip in a toy.

The only thing that this chip has to do is pick a RANDOM number (10th of a
second) between 1 and 24 seconds and then change the direction of a
motor.

eg; 1.4 seconds to the left
3.1 seconds to the right
12.4 seconds to the left
8.3 seconds to the right

etc...etc..

Any help in this matter would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

Berrie
 
D

David Harmon

Guest
On 28 Sep 2004 00:42:32 -0700 in sci.electronics.basics,
tomg@fullnet.com (Thomas P. Gootee) wrote,
michael_r_monteith@yahoo.com (Michael Monteith) wrote in message news:<1b3bbf98.0409230646.24b7b3ab@posting.google.com>...
Actually there is a Yahoo group that discusses all of this called Homebrew PCBs at:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Homebrew_PCBs/

Yes. That is an excellent PCB-making discussion-group.

Tom Gootee

http://www.fullnet.com/u/tomg
To hell with all yahoo groups. Please keep the discussion public and
accessible on usenet.
 
T

Terran Melconian

Guest
In article <415ae358$0$43451$e4fe514c@news.xs4all.nl>,
Bert <b123s@hotmail.com> wrote:
because else I can stop designing right now :)
Flash Programmable and Production Quantity don't go together in the same
sentence. If you want cheap prices for production volumes (which 10,000
is on the low end of), you'll be getting mask ROM parts.
 
Z

Zach Zaborny

Guest
Thanks, I'll probably use that for it's simplicty and ease of us :). The
Nixie clocks are very nice, and may be my next project, since it looks very
interesting.

Thanks once again,
Zach

"Olaf" <olafdonk@wanadQQ.nl> wrote in message
news:pan.2004.09.29.09.10.02.175805@wanadQQ.nl...

you might want to check http://www.mcamafia.de/nixie/ncp_en/ncp.htm ,
under the header 'Getting started with it: the proper timing' you can find
another CMOS-based way of generating 1Hz. It uses a crystal and is
therefor independent of the frequency of the mains line. (The circuit
works, I've build it from this site and my clock is running on time for a
few months now.)

bye, Olaf
 
J

john jardine

Guest
"Berrie" <berrie@xooby.com> wrote in message
news:b97ccce1.0409290352.5ca094ae@posting.google.com...
Dear Reader,

I'm looking for information (quotation for production quantity's)
for a little chip in a toy.

The only thing that this chip has to do is pick a RANDOM number (10th of a
second) between 1 and 24 seconds and then change the direction of a
motor.

eg; 1.4 seconds to the left
3.1 seconds to the right
12.4 seconds to the left
8.3 seconds to the right

etc...etc..

Any help in this matter would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

Berrie
"RANDOM", Maybe easier said than done. A micro running a stored programme
can't do it just on it's own.
There's got to be available somewhere, a real random variable that the
micro can then use as a 'seed' to maybe generate series of psuedo-random
values.
regards
john
 
J

John Popelish

Guest
Don Klipstein wrote:

Ever mix the light from a blue LED with the light from a yellow one?
It's certainly not green.
They cover too much of the visible spectrum to have any very saturated
color at all.


--
John Popelish
 
C

Christoph Loew

Guest
Don Klipstein wrote:

But where do they use blue traffic lights?

Japan, I think!

Not that I ever saw.


Maybe this came from the Japanese having the same word for the colors
blue and blue-green - something that I heard is true.
That is so; in the Japanese Language a 'green' traffic light is called
'blue' ["ao";"aoi"] while e.g. a 'green' leaf is 'green'
["midori";"midori no"]. As a result, a green traffic light and a blue
LED are described by the same adjective which may be the source of this
confusion - especially since the actual color of the traffic lights is
identical to the western ones.

Chris
 
D

Don Klipstein

Guest
In article <774e24ad.0409290453.543a164e@posting.google.com>, guy-jin wrote:
"Bullwinkle Jones" <bullwinklejones@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:<H5q6d.590$eq.23@edtnps84>...

But where do they use blue traffic lights?

Japan, I think!

Not that I ever saw.
Maybe this came from the Japanese having the same word for the colors
blue and blue-green - something that I heard is true.

- Don Klipstein (don@misty.com)
 
D

Don Klipstein

Guest
In article <izF6d.15638$54.238587@typhoon.sonic.net>, Don Bruder wrote:
Doubtful that it's "better", but... <shrug

(And never mind the fact that I brain-farted on the fact that we've had
green LEDs seemingly forever - Was thinking in terms of "Damn... Only
have red and yellow - Gotta "build" green if using LEDs, and the only
way to do that is yellow plus blue.")
Ever mix the light from a blue LED with the light from a yellow one?
It's certainly not green.

- Don Klipstein (don@misty.com)
 
O

Olaf

Guest
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 23:48:04 -0400, Zach Zaborny wrote:

Thanks, I'll probably use that for it's simplicty and ease of us :). The
Nixie clocks are very nice, and may be my next project, since it looks
very interesting.
if you're interested in nixie's: you can find a lot of homebrewn
nixieclocks at
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/electricstuff/nixiegallery.html and at
http://home.wanadoo.nl/olafdonk/nixie/ you can see some pictures of my
nixieclock (just ignore the Dutch). I've used Peter Wendt's circuit for
this clock. At http://home.wanadoo.nl/olafdonk/display/ there are some
pictures of the big 7segment display's I'm using for my current
clock-project. I still needed a (non-pic-oriented) circuit for that, so
the link from your original post was most welcome ;-)

bye, olaf
 
F

Fred Bartoli

Guest
"Don Klipstein" <don@manx.misty.com> a écrit dans le message de
news:slrnclmvmg.4j9.don@manx.misty.com...
In article <774e24ad.0409290453.543a164e@posting.google.com>, guy-jin
wrote:
"Bullwinkle Jones" <bullwinklejones@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:<H5q6d.590$eq.23@edtnps84>...

But where do they use blue traffic lights?

Japan, I think!

Not that I ever saw.

Maybe this came from the Japanese having the same word for the colors
blue and blue-green - something that I heard is true.
I've hear they have brue-gleen reds too.


--
Thanks,
Fred.
 
J

Joe McElvenney

Guest
Hi,

...................... Everything costs money, or is a crappy
trial and all I want to do is program a damn Pic in Picbasic.
Here's a definitely 'non-crappy' trial PIC simulation and programming
package which will cost you a mere USD-19 if you can spare it.


http://www.oshonsoft.com/


IMHO, they don't come much better than this at the price. FREE is
nice but you can spend half your life looking for it. Just like a
motorist driving from petrol station to petrol station looking for the
cheapest fuel.


Cheers - Joe
 
T

T

Guest
Animesh Maurya a écrit :
T <bcbmasm@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<4157f306$0$12144$636a15ce@news.free.fr>...
Hello,
Anny one knows where to find good tutorials to start learning FPGA
(Article, web site, free simulation software ...)
Thanks
ps : i'm an electronic engineer (control design)
Sure check out this book
http://www.xilinx.com/publications/products/cpld/logic_handbook.pdf
9MB file, have patience.

Regards,
AM
Thanks.
 
B

Brian Oakley

Guest
<jake59@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:4174f521.249577781@news-server.hawaii.rr.com...
I would like to charge my portable DVD player using a portable solar
charger rated at 20 watts with 16.5 volts (23 volts open circuit) but
am concerned that I may damage the player with too high a voltage.

Is this a valid concern?? If so, is there a device to step down the
voltage from the solar charger that would not significantly affect the
charging rate??

Thanx,

Jake
What does the charger that the DVD player uses now put out? It depends on
the voltage of the batteries primarily as to the likelihood that the solar
charger you want to use can in fact be used. As far as something to step
down the voltage, if the voltage difference between the required charge
voltage for the DVD and the 16.5 volts output that the solar charger will
put out is minimal (within +- 5 volts), a step down resistor would work just
fine. If the voltage difference is much more than that, then your charge
rate will increase accordingly.
A few more specifics about what youre trying to charge would help more.
Brian
 
R

Rich Webb

Guest
On 30 Sep 2004 11:27:27 -0700, tomg@fullnet.com (Thomas P. Gootee)
wrote:

[snip...snip...]
Anybody else?
Heartily concur; good post. (Although I'll admit that I was *so* tempted
to quote the entire article and then stick a "Me too!" at the end. ;-)

--
Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
 
R

Roy McCammon

Guest
you the impedence (complex) with the far end
shorted and with it open and the characteristic
impedence is the (complex) geometric mean of those
two measurements.

Archer wrote:
how to measure the characteristic impedance of a coax?
I'm starting to study the rf circuit design.
 
C

CFoley1064

Guest
Subject: Does my computer have a Microcontroller in it?
From: john_20_28_2000@yahoo.com (jm)
Date: 10/1/2004 4:12 PM Central Daylight Time
Message-id: <c67e4bdd.0410011312.f2f079f@posting.google.com

I know it has a Microprocessor, but does it also have a
Microcontroller? For example, I am (from a project I found) going to
have my PC control some LEDs and a LCD display. But since the
microprocessor doesn't have resident I/O, etc., then what is it that
actually sends data through the parallel port to the outside world?

How does it fit together here? I hope you understand. Thanks.
Technically, yes. The PC does have a microcontroller in the keyboard. All PCs
(after the original PC and XT) have had a microcontroller in the keyboard to
read keys, light LEDs and communicate with the PC.

An earlier post describes the parallel port and chipsets. You might want to
look at Jan Axelson's "Parallel Port Complete", and look at the website for the
book.

http://www.lvr.com/parport.htm

There's a lot of good information for beginners there.

Chris
 
B

Bob Masta

Guest
On 1 Oct 2004 14:12:05 -0700, john_20_28_2000@yahoo.com (jm) wrote:

I know it has a Microprocessor, but does it also have a
Microcontroller? For example, I am (from a project I found) going to
have my PC control some LEDs and a LCD display. But since the
microprocessor doesn't have resident I/O, etc., then what is it that
actually sends data through the parallel port to the outside world?

How does it fit together here? I hope you understand. Thanks.
Your computer does have resident I/O instructions. Windows
NT, 2K, and XP just prevent you from using them to talk to the
parallel port, unless you use a special driver ike GIVEIO. If you
have Win9x or anything that can run real-mode DOS you can
talk to the port directly through the I/O bus.



Bob Masta
dqatechATdaqartaDOTcom

D A Q A R T A
Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
www.daqarta.com
 
D

David Harmon

Guest
On 1 Oct 2004 20:24:33 -0700 in sci.electronics.basics, jeffm_@email.com
(JeffM) wrote,
I have used Wire on board layouts to fatten up things (a cheat)
Why not just "change width"
 
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