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Battery doorbell local repeater?...

T

T i m

Guest
Hi all,

I appreciate this is a design rather than repair question but I
appreciate there are some very skilled people here. ;-)

Scenario. I have a wired bellpush on the front door (frame) that runs
to a battery \'Ding-dong\' type solenoid chime further back in the
house, the idea being that \'we\' can hear it anywhere in the house (we
can) and also in the back garden if we are lucky (we also sometimes
can).

The \'problem\' is that you can\'t generally hear it outside the DG front
door and so couriers often ring the bell *and* repeatedly bang on the
glass door or flap the letterbox flap, sometimes winding the dog up
thinking it\'s an aggressor. ;-)

So, I was just wondering ... if I had some sort of small
electro-mechanical buzzer (possibly to also give physical feedback),
just inside the front door (on the inside door frame, directly behind
the bell push for best feedback and easy wiring) that you could hear
from the outside, that might give anyone on the outside some level of
positive feedback that the bell had worked (hopefully anyway)?

So, I am limited to 6V DC via the 4 x C cells (currently Ni-Mh\'s so
only 4.8V) and don\'t want to add any real parasitic drain, especially
if I go back to alkaline cells to get the full 6V.

So I was thinking (but am no electronics design engineer) of some form
of diode fed - series resistance cap that could be charged by the 6V
supply seen at the back of the bell push that could then be discharged
via a low voltage buzzer when the button is pressed (even if only once
and for ~1s) ... and would then reset ready for another press say in
30 seconds time (given the original doorbell will continue to work as
normal etc).

Things I believe are relevant ... you would need a cap big enough to
provide as good a quality level of power long enough to give a
significant \'buzz\' to be heard.

The charging resistance would need to be low enough to not cause the
bell to hang on the \'Ding\', once the button was released (the chime
solenoid just returns under spring power when no current flows but
might be \'held\' by a much lower current (so no proper \'dong\').

I didn\'t know if the buzzer trigger could / should be done by a self
latching circuit of some sort or if one should use a zener to manage
the voltage allowing a better release action?

I am aware of all the other options like using a mains transformer or
wireless repeater / converters, I was really only interested in seeing
if such a direct repeater could be practical? ;-)

Cheers, T i m

p.s. Yesterday I successfully repaired one of those plug in wirelessly
charged PIR / power cut type torch / lights. It was a resistor that
burns out in the 240V base and is replaced (sometimes along with a
transistor and cap) and normally get\'s them working again.
Unfortunately the Lithium (14430) battery in the torch part had gone
very flat (sub 1V) so I have a replacement on the way.
 
T

Tim Schwartz

Guest
Good morning Tim,

I have a device that is essentially a microphone placed near your
doorbell chime 9powered by 4 AA batteries (or maybe AAA) that then
transmits to an AC powered ringer that you plug into a convenient
outlet. Here is one from Home Depot:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Heath-Zenith-Wireless-Plug-In-Door-Chime-and-Entry-Alert-SL-7368-02/100627086

Now this unit is 120V, and I have no idea if you have Home Depot stores
in your 240VAC country, but there must be something similar. The pickup
units batteries seem to last 2-3 years, and it rarely false triggers,
unless I slam the closet door it is mounted near.

Best regards,
another Tim


On 10/22/2020 6:37 AM, T i m wrote:
Hi all,

I appreciate this is a design rather than repair question but I
appreciate there are some very skilled people here. ;-)

Scenario. I have a wired bellpush on the front door (frame) that runs
to a battery \'Ding-dong\' type solenoid chime further back in the
house, the idea being that \'we\' can hear it anywhere in the house (we
can) and also in the back garden if we are lucky (we also sometimes
can).

The \'problem\' is that you can\'t generally hear it outside the DG front
door and so couriers often ring the bell *and* repeatedly bang on the
glass door or flap the letterbox flap, sometimes winding the dog up
thinking it\'s an aggressor. ;-)

So, I was just wondering ... if I had some sort of small
electro-mechanical buzzer (possibly to also give physical feedback),
just inside the front door (on the inside door frame, directly behind
the bell push for best feedback and easy wiring) that you could hear
from the outside, that might give anyone on the outside some level of
positive feedback that the bell had worked (hopefully anyway)?

So, I am limited to 6V DC via the 4 x C cells (currently Ni-Mh\'s so
only 4.8V) and don\'t want to add any real parasitic drain, especially
if I go back to alkaline cells to get the full 6V.

So I was thinking (but am no electronics design engineer) of some form
of diode fed - series resistance cap that could be charged by the 6V
supply seen at the back of the bell push that could then be discharged
via a low voltage buzzer when the button is pressed (even if only once
and for ~1s) ... and would then reset ready for another press say in
30 seconds time (given the original doorbell will continue to work as
normal etc).

Things I believe are relevant ... you would need a cap big enough to
provide as good a quality level of power long enough to give a
significant \'buzz\' to be heard.

The charging resistance would need to be low enough to not cause the
bell to hang on the \'Ding\', once the button was released (the chime
solenoid just returns under spring power when no current flows but
might be \'held\' by a much lower current (so no proper \'dong\').

I didn\'t know if the buzzer trigger could / should be done by a self
latching circuit of some sort or if one should use a zener to manage
the voltage allowing a better release action?

I am aware of all the other options like using a mains transformer or
wireless repeater / converters, I was really only interested in seeing
if such a direct repeater could be practical? ;-)

Cheers, T i m

p.s. Yesterday I successfully repaired one of those plug in wirelessly
charged PIR / power cut type torch / lights. It was a resistor that
burns out in the 240V base and is replaced (sometimes along with a
transistor and cap) and normally get\'s them working again.
Unfortunately the Lithium (14430) battery in the torch part had gone
very flat (sub 1V) so I have a replacement on the way.
 
P

pfjw@aol.com

Guest
What about installing another light-draw chime just inside your door? Activating the button would trip both. Just put it in series with the bell.

KISS

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
 
T

T i m

Guest
On Thu, 22 Oct 2020 08:26:49 -0400, Tim Schwartz <tim@bristolnj.com>
wrote:

>Good morning Tim,

Hi Tim!
I have a device that is essentially a microphone placed near your
doorbell chime 9powered by 4 AA batteries (or maybe AAA) that then
transmits to an AC powered ringer that you plug into a convenient
outlet.
The problem is, I don\'t have a \'convenient outlets\' near the front
door. ;-(

Here is one from Home Depot:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Heath-Zenith-Wireless-Plug-In-Door-Chime-and-Entry-Alert-SL-7368-02/100627086

Now this unit is 120V, and I have no idea if you have Home Depot stores
in your 240VAC country, but there must be something similar.
Yeah, there are a few similar things available over here and even a
doorbell that allows you to hook up a conventional wired / battery
bell and trigger a wireless one, again, I didn\'t really want to have
anything \'else\' if I could get away with a small buzzer / sounder
inside the front door. That would help the Mrs hear it as she\'s
normally just the other side of the internal wall in the lounge. ;-)


The pickup
units batteries seem to last 2-3 years, and it rarely false triggers,
unless I slam the closet door it is mounted near.
Hehe.
>

We had the similar thing again this morning ... I heard the doorbell
go but as I was getting up to answer the door, he was knocking on the
glass because *he* hadn\'t seen / heard any feedback that the bell was
working.

If I can find a suitable mini-buzzer it may well work in series with
the existing bell and so would be very easy to tack into the existing
circuit and mount just behind the bell push.

We hear both things, they hear the buzzer. ;-)

Cheers, T i m
 
T

Tim R

Guest
Two thoughts, from a mechanical engineer.

1. Cheap solution: write DOORBELL WORKS! on a 3x5 card and tape it to the door.

2. Also cheap solution: if you\'re like 90% of people you have a smoke alarm that doesn\'t work because you\'ve changed the battery. Take out the little piezo speaker and put it on the other side of the door. Wire it to the buzzer. Include the 9 volt battery as needed. (not sure exactly how your doorbell is powered.

I apologize in advance for violating the Terms of Use of this forum, which include to provide the most complicated DIY electronic design project possible for any problem that might have a simpler solution.
 
T

T i m

Guest
On Thu, 22 Oct 2020 06:28:39 -0700 (PDT), \"pfjw@aol.com\"
<peterwieck33@gmail.com> wrote:

>What about installing another light-draw chime just inside your door? Activating the button would trip both. Just put it in series with the bell.

That was another thought Peter (and was suggested elsewhere), maybe a
electromechanical buzzer so they hear the buzzer directly and also any
reverberations that travel though the frame etc.
Quite, but the issue with the above is that I\'d need to get lucky and
find something that would work itself and allow the existing bell to
ring, especially when it\'s already running on a reduced voltage (4.8V
of Ni-Mh rather than 6V of alkaline).

That\'s why I was trying to isolate the existing bell functionality and
leech some power off that to run an auxiliary sounder.

Cheers, T i m
 
T

T i m

Guest
On Thu, 22 Oct 2020 08:32:25 -0700 (PDT), Tim R <timothy42b@aol.com>
wrote:

Two thoughts, from a mechanical engineer.

1. Cheap solution: write DOORBELL WORKS! on a 3x5 card and tape it to the door.
Worth a try ... except the batteries do go flat and so the bell
doesn\'t work .. ;-(

I was going to include an LED in the bell push that lights or flashes
when they press the button (discharging cap) but again, that\'s
assuming they look for such (and most deliveries are in the day and
this would be South facing).
2. Also cheap solution: if you\'re like 90% of people you have a smoke alarm that doesn\'t work because you\'ve changed the battery. Take out the little piezo speaker and put it on the other side of the door.
That was the sort of idea of my plan. ;-)

>Wire it to the buzzer. Include the 9 volt battery as needed. (not sure exactly how your doorbell is powered.

6V in series with the solenoid and bell push.
I apologize in advance for violating the Terms of Use of this forum, which include to provide the most complicated DIY electronic design project possible for any problem that might have a simpler solution.
;-)

The thing is, I\'m not sure a simple solution works in this situation.
What I was hoping for is a \'subtle\' (electronically) solution that
does what I need.

So, under normal circumstances there will be 6V DC across the open
bell push.

I have a cct in parallel with that that charges a cap via a diode and
resistor I have a small \'remote\' PSU that wouldn\'t be affected by the
bell push shorting it out (because of the diode).

If something could latch and discharge the cap though a buzzer and
release once it has, everything else the doorbell will 1) work as
designed and 2) the \'repeater\' should work without much interference
to the existing solution, albeit other than a slightly increased load
on the battery.

If I could find a buzzer that works from 1.2V, I could put a couple of
fwd biased diodes across it and went back to alkaline cells, that
should work and be as simple as it can get?

Cheers T i m
 
P

pfjw@aol.com

Guest
Keeping in mind that this forum exists so that the uninformed may provide the least appropriate, most complicated, least reliable solutions for established problems with established (and reliable) solutions such that the requester of such information may be relieved of taking responsibility to do the right thing in the first place, over-complication is the natural order of things (Thank you, TImothy).

https://www.radioshack.com/products/radioshack-12vdc-6-16v-piezo-buzzer?variant=20332219525

Put it in a small WireMold box right inside the door by the door jamb. Feed it from the bell wire - take one lead, and connect the buzzer in SERIES with that lead. At 58 ma, it will not overload your transformer.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
 
T

T i m

Guest
On Thu, 22 Oct 2020 11:32:13 -0700 (PDT), \"pfjw@aol.com\"
<peterwieck33@gmail.com> wrote:

>Keeping in mind that this forum exists so that the uninformed may provide the least appropriate, most complicated, least reliable solutions for established problems with established (and reliable) solutions such that the requester of such information may be relieved of taking responsibility to do the right thing in the first place, over-complication is the natural order of things (Thank you, TImothy).

I\'m keeping out of that one. ;-)
https://www.radioshack.com/products/radioshack-12vdc-6-16v-piezo-buzzer?variant=20332219525

Put it in a small WireMold box
Or I could design / 3D print something. If it were white it could stay
as it is.

>right inside the door by the door jamb.

Yeah, as long as it will fit on the inner frame (inwards opening door)
that will be fine. The frame is the same size as the end of the
corridor (the door was made to fit the space) so there isn\'t a lot of
clearance on either side for much.

>Feed it from the bell wire - take one lead, and connect the buzzer in SERIES with that lead.

OK.

> At 58 ma, it will not overload your transformer.

Well, it\'s batteries but if the buzzer requires a minimum of 6V and
the battery is only 6V, I\'m not sure either buzzer or bell will still
work will they?

This was why I was thinking of some way of \'phatoming the 6V (battery)
psu to the bellpush and using that to source the voltage often
required to run these sounders?

I wasn\'t looking to make it complicated on purpose, I just couldn\'t
see how it could be KISS and still do what I want / need?

Something that could be easily modified is the PSU for the bell
itself. The bell sits on the side of the stairs so a small hole though
the back of the bell box for a cable to a small 12V battery (sealed
Lead acid or possibly a similar voltage diy Li-Ion pack) should be
doable. *Then* I have the spare 6V for a frame mounted buzzer. ;-)

Cheers, T i m
 
B

Bob Engelhardt

Guest
On 10/22/2020 12:40 PM, T i m wrote:
....
> If I could find a buzzer that works from 1.2V, ...

1.5v:
https://www.futureelectronics.com/c/passives/sound-devices--buzzers/products?q=%3Arelevance%3Afeature-buzzers-TypeBuzzers%3AElectro-Acoustic%3Afeature-buzzers-RatedVoltage%3A1.5V&selectedTab=products&text=
 
T

T i m

Guest
On Thu, 22 Oct 2020 19:37:47 -0400, Bob Engelhardt
<BobEngelhardt@comcast.net> wrote:

On 10/22/2020 12:40 PM, T i m wrote:
...
If I could find a buzzer that works from 1.2V, ...

1.5v:
https://www.futureelectronics.com/c/passives/sound-devices--buzzers/products?q=%3Arelevance%3Afeature-buzzers-TypeBuzzers%3AElectro-Acoustic%3Afeature-buzzers-RatedVoltage%3A1.5V&selectedTab=products&text=
Thanks for that Bob.

I\'m, confused. I asked about one of those (Electro-Acoustic
Transducer) on eBay, if it was a speaker or if it produced a noise on
it\'s own, just with a supply voltage etc and they replied it was just
a speaker, requiring external driving (assuming I\'m seeing what you
intended on the link)?


Cheers, T i m
 
B

Bob Engelhardt

Guest
On 10/23/2020 2:15 PM, T i m wrote:
On Thu, 22 Oct 2020 19:37:47 -0400, Bob Engelhardt
BobEngelhardt@comcast.net> wrote:

On 10/22/2020 12:40 PM, T i m wrote:
...
If I could find a buzzer that works from 1.2V, ...

1.5v:
https://www.futureelectronics.com/c/passives/sound-devices--buzzers/products?q=%3Arelevance%3Afeature-buzzers-TypeBuzzers%3AElectro-Acoustic%3Afeature-buzzers-RatedVoltage%3A1.5V&selectedTab=products&text=

Thanks for that Bob.

I\'m, confused. I asked about one of those (Electro-Acoustic
Transducer) on eBay, if it was a speaker or if it produced a noise on
it\'s own, just with a supply voltage etc and they replied it was just
a speaker, requiring external driving (assuming I\'m seeing what you
intended on the link)?


Cheers, T i m
You\'re right, sorry. Brain fart. These are true buzzers, a couple work
down to 1.2v:
https://tinyurl.com/yyv9oq85
 
M

Michael Terrell

Guest
On Friday, October 23, 2020 at 2:15:46 PM UTC-4, T i m wrote:
I\'m, confused. I asked about one of those (Electro-Acoustic
Transducer) on eBay, if it was a speaker or if it produced a noise on
it\'s own, just with a supply voltage etc and they replied it was just
a speaker, requiring external driving (assuming I\'m seeing what you
intended on the link)?
Is the doorbell mechanical, with a coil and contacts that open and close? If so, a speaker in series would make noise from the interruptions in current flow. It might be loud enough for your needs. The only way to find out is to test it with any old speaker that you have laying around.
 
B

Bob Engelhardt

Guest
You could put the at-the-door buzzer in parallel with the interior bell.
It would require a separate battery & its occasional replacement.

------|>|---+---|<|-----
| | |
1.2v | Interior
Buzzer push Bell
| button |
AA batt | 6v batt
| | |
|-----------+-----------|
 
C

Chris Jones

Guest
On 22/10/2020 21:37, T i m wrote:
Hi all,

I appreciate this is a design rather than repair question but I
appreciate there are some very skilled people here. ;-)

Scenario. I have a wired bellpush on the front door (frame) that runs
to a battery \'Ding-dong\' type solenoid chime further back in the
house, the idea being that \'we\' can hear it anywhere in the house (we
can) and also in the back garden if we are lucky (we also sometimes
can).

The \'problem\' is that you can\'t generally hear it outside the DG front
door and so couriers often ring the bell *and* repeatedly bang on the
glass door or flap the letterbox flap, sometimes winding the dog up
thinking it\'s an aggressor. ;-)

So, I was just wondering ... if I had some sort of small
electro-mechanical buzzer (possibly to also give physical feedback),
just inside the front door (on the inside door frame, directly behind
the bell push for best feedback and easy wiring) that you could hear
from the outside, that might give anyone on the outside some level of
positive feedback that the bell had worked (hopefully anyway)?

So, I am limited to 6V DC via the 4 x C cells (currently Ni-Mh\'s so
only 4.8V) and don\'t want to add any real parasitic drain, especially
if I go back to alkaline cells to get the full 6V.

So I was thinking (but am no electronics design engineer) of some form
of diode fed - series resistance cap that could be charged by the 6V
supply seen at the back of the bell push that could then be discharged
via a low voltage buzzer when the button is pressed (even if only once
and for ~1s) ... and would then reset ready for another press say in
30 seconds time (given the original doorbell will continue to work as
normal etc).

Things I believe are relevant ... you would need a cap big enough to
provide as good a quality level of power long enough to give a
significant \'buzz\' to be heard.

The charging resistance would need to be low enough to not cause the
bell to hang on the \'Ding\', once the button was released (the chime
solenoid just returns under spring power when no current flows but
might be \'held\' by a much lower current (so no proper \'dong\').

I didn\'t know if the buzzer trigger could / should be done by a self
latching circuit of some sort or if one should use a zener to manage
the voltage allowing a better release action?
Do you even need any trigger/latching circuit? Often doorbells only make
a sound when the button is pressed, so the visitor should not be
bothered by that, and it would not require such a trigger circuit.

Why not do pretty much exactly what you already suggested:

Get a big capacitor (perhaps a couple of 1 Farad 5.5V supercapacitors in
series, they are quite small and should withstand 6V even without
equalising resistors), charge the capacitor from the existing doorbell
wiring via a 1N4004...1N4007 diode, and put a piezo or mechanical buzzer
connected in parallel with the diode in the direction with the positive
of the buzzer connected to the cathode of the diode. During charging,
the buzzer will experience 0.7V of reverse bias which probably won\'t
bother it, and when the button is pressed, the diode is reverse biased
and the buzzer receives whatever voltage the capacitor was charged to.
For simplicity, don\'t bother with any extra series resistor to limit the
charging current, as that would expose the buzzer to more reverse bias,
and it is probably unnecessary after the first charging cycle. The
capacitor won\'t have time to discharge much when the button is pressed,
which means it won\'t take long to recharge either. When the circuit is
initially installed, it might take a while to charge the capacitor,
perhaps a minute or so.

So you need capacitor, diode, buzzer.

If the existing bell has a lot of inductance, when the button is
released there might be a large voltage kick across the switch. The
diode ought to catch this so I would not expect it to fry the new piezo
buzzer, but it might alter the sound of the existing doorbell when it
releases.
 
T

Tim R

Guest
On Monday, October 26, 2020 at 8:03:22 AM UTC-4, Chris Jones wrote:
On 22/10/2020 21:37, T i m wrote:
Hi all,

I appreciate this is a design rather than repair question but I
appreciate there are some very skilled people here. ;-)

Scenario. I have a wired bellpush on the front door (frame) that runs
to a battery \'Ding-dong\' type solenoid chime further back in the
house, the idea being that \'we\' can hear it anywhere in the house (we
can) and also in the back garden if we are lucky (we also sometimes
can).

The \'problem\' is that you can\'t generally hear it outside the DG front
door and so couriers often ring the bell *and* repeatedly bang on the
glass door or flap the letterbox flap, sometimes winding the dog up
thinking it\'s an aggressor. ;-)

So, I was just wondering ... if I had some sort of small
electro-mechanical buzzer (possibly to also give physical feedback),
just inside the front door (on the inside door frame, directly behind
the bell push for best feedback and easy wiring) that you could hear
from the outside, that might give anyone on the outside some level of
positive feedback that the bell had worked (hopefully anyway)?

So, I am limited to 6V DC via the 4 x C cells (currently Ni-Mh\'s so
only 4.8V) and don\'t want to add any real parasitic drain, especially
if I go back to alkaline cells to get the full 6V.

So I was thinking (but am no electronics design engineer) of some form
of diode fed - series resistance cap that could be charged by the 6V
supply seen at the back of the bell push that could then be discharged
via a low voltage buzzer when the button is pressed (even if only once
and for ~1s) ... and would then reset ready for another press say in
30 seconds time (given the original doorbell will continue to work as
normal etc).

Things I believe are relevant ... you would need a cap big enough to
provide as good a quality level of power long enough to give a
significant \'buzz\' to be heard.

The charging resistance would need to be low enough to not cause the
bell to hang on the \'Ding\', once the button was released (the chime
solenoid just returns under spring power when no current flows but
might be \'held\' by a much lower current (so no proper \'dong\').

I didn\'t know if the buzzer trigger could / should be done by a self
latching circuit of some sort or if one should use a zener to manage
the voltage allowing a better release action?

Do you even need any trigger/latching circuit? Often doorbells only make
a sound when the button is pressed, so the visitor should not be
bothered by that, and it would not require such a trigger circuit.

Why not do pretty much exactly what you already suggested:

Get a big capacitor (perhaps a couple of 1 Farad 5.5V supercapacitors in
series, they are quite small and should withstand 6V even without
equalising resistors), charge the capacitor from the existing doorbell
wiring via a 1N4004...1N4007 diode, and put a piezo or mechanical buzzer
connected in parallel with the diode in the direction with the positive
of the buzzer connected to the cathode of the diode. During charging,
the buzzer will experience 0.7V of reverse bias which probably won\'t
bother it, and when the button is pressed, the diode is reverse biased
and the buzzer receives whatever voltage the capacitor was charged to.
For simplicity, don\'t bother with any extra series resistor to limit the
charging current, as that would expose the buzzer to more reverse bias,
and it is probably unnecessary after the first charging cycle. The
capacitor won\'t have time to discharge much when the button is pressed,
which means it won\'t take long to recharge either. When the circuit is
initially installed, it might take a while to charge the capacitor,
perhaps a minute or so.

So you need capacitor, diode, buzzer.

If the existing bell has a lot of inductance, when the button is
released there might be a large voltage kick across the switch. The
diode ought to catch this so I would not expect it to fry the new piezo
buzzer, but it might alter the sound of the existing doorbell when it
releases.
Hey, I like it, but we can complicate it more. I think we need a Raspberry Pi or an Arduino in the circuit controlling it.
 
R

Ralph Mowery

Guest
In article <f154b2a6-021c-4824-8893-851434c464a0o@googlegroups.com>,
timothy42b@aol.com says...
Hey, I like it, but we can complicate it more. I think we need a Raspberry Pi or an Arduino in the circuit controlling it.
Outside of the programming the Arduino is very simple to use for many
things. They can be bought for less than $ 5 from many places in China.

That is often less expensive than many of the relays it would take to do
the job.
 
T

Tim R

Guest
On Monday, October 26, 2020 at 1:38:41 PM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:
In article <f154b2a6-021c-4824-8893-851434c464a0o@googlegroups.com>,
timothy42b@aol.com says...

Hey, I like it, but we can complicate it more. I think we need a Raspberry Pi or an Arduino in the circuit controlling it.



Outside of the programming the Arduino is very simple to use for many
things. They can be bought for less than $ 5 from many places in China.

That is often less expensive than many of the relays it would take to do
the job.
I need to learn more about that; this is one of those technical advances that kind of sneaked by me. I was trying to figure out if I could replace my washer timer with something like that, 30 year old Maytag and can\'t get parts, but then it started working again.

They really really don\'t make them like that anymore.
 
R

Ralph Mowery

Guest
In article <76029fb8-8b71-4026-8aaf-7b0345115cfco@googlegroups.com>,
timothy42b@aol.com says...
I need to learn more about that; this is one of those technical advances that kind of sneaked by me. I was trying to figure out if I could replace my washer timer with something like that, 30 year old Maytag and can\'t get parts, but then it started working again.

They really really don\'t make them like that anymore.
They are really simple and inexpensive. For your washer timer one
should work fine. They have several inputs and outputs. There are
internal timmers you can set the time of. So you input a signal on one
pin and start a timer. When it times out, send a signal to one of the
output pins. Then start the process all over again with another input
and output.

While they will do more, they really excell at things like a minature
PLC.

There are some learning kits for around $ 100.

https://www.drduino.com/products/dr-duino-explorer-edition
 
P

Peter W.

Guest
30 year old Maytag and can\'t get parts, but then it started working again.

https://www.partselect.com/Maytag-Washer-Timers.htm

https://www.partsimple.com/may-wp22004189.html?gclid=Cj0KCQjwit_8BRCoARIsAIx3Rj4vL_WajLBrHLk3CWogi7WivJECirdblL1X0k31mWSCwLBoDPqJo1gaAjY9EALw_wcB

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRtHni3LuXQ

I doubt if there is a part or piece in any Maytag of similar vintage that cannot be found somewhere, and in short order. We have a Maytag dryer at our summer house, and just replaced the belt, rollers, idler and motor with new parts (made in Mexico and the USA) all for less than $100 installed (by me). It was made in 1971.

> They really really don\'t make them like that anymore.

And for very good reason: 30 - 45 gallons of water per load. Up to 2 gallons of water left behind (full load) that has to be dried. And more. But, they do work well, when they work.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
 
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