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Dechucka
Guest

Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:45 am   



On 29/09/2019 12:39 pm, Petzl wrote:
Quote:
On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 10:55:58 +1000, Dechucka <Dechucka1_at_hotmail.com
wrote:

snip

Best traffic lights I came across were mechanically timed and set so
if you stayed at speed limit you got a green light every time,

When ASIO gave you your top secret direct hot-line batphone didn't they
give you the code to turn all the traffic lights on your trip green? I
got the code when I joined the 'Stonecutters' of course I have to put it
in backwards as they drive on the wrong side of the road.

Can't do that with mechanical lights


Sydney lights are electronic, that's how the globes light on

Quote:
They do, do this in Sydney which has controlled lights for when he and
his druggy mates drove from Canberra to Kings Cross the "biggest bed
in Australia" where the limo parked in no parking zone underneath it's
veranda


Hey don't dis Fred Nile

Henry Briggs
Guest

Sun Sep 29, 2019 7:45 am   



On 29/9/19 12:39 pm, Petzl wrote:
Quote:
On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 10:55:58 +1000, Dechucka <Dechucka1_at_hotmail.com
wrote:

snip

Best traffic lights I came across were mechanically timed and set so
if you stayed at speed limit you got a green light every time,

When ASIO gave you your top secret direct hot-line batphone didn't they
give you the code to turn all the traffic lights on your trip green? I
got the code when I joined the 'Stonecutters' of course I have to put it
in backwards as they drive on the wrong side of the road.

Can't do that with mechanical lights
They do, do this in Sydney which has controlled lights for when he and
his druggy mates drove from Canberra to Kings Cross the "biggest bed
in Australia" where the limo parked in no parking zone underneath it's
veranda

Watch out Pizzle, don't the Jews control the traffic lights?


Dechucka
Guest

Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:45 am   



On 29/09/2019 4:29 pm, Henry Briggs wrote:
Quote:
On 29/9/19 12:39 pm, Petzl wrote:
On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 10:55:58 +1000, Dechucka <Dechucka1_at_hotmail.com
wrote:

snip

Best traffic lights I came across were mechanically timed and set so
if you stayed at speed limit you got a green light every time,

When ASIO gave you your top secret direct hot-line batphone didn't they
give you the code to turn all the traffic lights on your trip green? I
got the code when I joined the 'Stonecutters' of course I have to put it
in backwards as they drive on the wrong side of the road.

Can't do that with mechanical lights
They do, do this in Sydney which has controlled lights for when he and
his druggy mates drove from Canberra to Kings Cross the "biggest bed
in Australia" where the limo parked in no parking zone underneath it's
veranda

Watch out Pizzle, don't the Jews control the traffic lights?


That's why us Gentiles get a better run from sunset Friday till the 3
stars on Saturday night

Petzl
Guest

Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:45 am   



On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 16:29:55 +1000, Henry Briggs <HJBriggs_at_gmail.com>
wrote:

Quote:
On 29/9/19 12:39 pm, Petzl wrote:
On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 10:55:58 +1000, Dechucka <Dechucka1_at_hotmail.com
wrote:

snip

Best traffic lights I came across were mechanically timed and set so
if you stayed at speed limit you got a green light every time,

When ASIO gave you your top secret direct hot-line batphone didn't they
give you the code to turn all the traffic lights on your trip green? I
got the code when I joined the 'Stonecutters' of course I have to put it
in backwards as they drive on the wrong side of the road.

Can't do that with mechanical lights
They do, do this in Sydney which has controlled lights for when he and
his druggy mates drove from Canberra to Kings Cross the "biggest bed
in Australia" where the limo parked in no parking zone underneath it's
veranda

Watch out Pizzle, don't the Jews control the traffic lights?


More importantly "our" media
--
Petzl
"It cannot be overstated, Bolsheviks committed the greatest human slaughter in modern history, and the fact that the world is largely ignorant
and uncaring about this fact is proof that the global media are in the hands of the perpetrators"

Russian Gulag survivor, novelist, historian, and short story writer. A. Solzhenitsyn - Gulag Archipelago

Dechucka
Guest

Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:45 am   



On 29/09/2019 5:23 pm, Petzl wrote:
Quote:
On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 16:29:55 +1000, Henry Briggs <HJBriggs_at_gmail.com
wrote:

On 29/9/19 12:39 pm, Petzl wrote:
On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 10:55:58 +1000, Dechucka <Dechucka1_at_hotmail.com
wrote:

snip

Best traffic lights I came across were mechanically timed and set so
if you stayed at speed limit you got a green light every time,

When ASIO gave you your top secret direct hot-line batphone didn't they
give you the code to turn all the traffic lights on your trip green? I
got the code when I joined the 'Stonecutters' of course I have to put it
in backwards as they drive on the wrong side of the road.

Can't do that with mechanical lights
They do, do this in Sydney which has controlled lights for when he and
his druggy mates drove from Canberra to Kings Cross the "biggest bed
in Australia" where the limo parked in no parking zone underneath it's
veranda

Watch out Pizzle, don't the Jews control the traffic lights?

More importantly "our" media


How do they do this? Who are the Jews behind it, maybe Soros? BTW you do
know Thunburg is a Jewish name shortened from Thunburgstein don't you?

Petzl
Guest

Sun Sep 29, 2019 9:45 am   



On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 17:28:58 +1000, Dechucka <Dechucka1_at_hotmail.com>
wrote:

Quote:
On 29/09/2019 5:23 pm, Petzl wrote:
On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 16:29:55 +1000, Henry Briggs <HJBriggs_at_gmail.com
wrote:

On 29/9/19 12:39 pm, Petzl wrote:
On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 10:55:58 +1000, Dechucka <Dechucka1_at_hotmail.com
wrote:

snip

Best traffic lights I came across were mechanically timed and set so
if you stayed at speed limit you got a green light every time,

When ASIO gave you your top secret direct hot-line batphone didn't they
give you the code to turn all the traffic lights on your trip green? I
got the code when I joined the 'Stonecutters' of course I have to put it
in backwards as they drive on the wrong side of the road.

Can't do that with mechanical lights
They do, do this in Sydney which has controlled lights for when he and
his druggy mates drove from Canberra to Kings Cross the "biggest bed
in Australia" where the limo parked in no parking zone underneath it's
veranda

Watch out Pizzle, don't the Jews control the traffic lights?

More importantly "our" media

How do they do this? Who are the Jews behind it, maybe Soros? BTW you do
know Thunburg is a Jewish name shortened from Thunburgstein don't you?


Thunburg maybe don't think so
--
Petzl
"It cannot be overstated, Bolsheviks committed the greatest human slaughter in modern history, and the fact that the world is largely ignorant
and uncaring about this fact is proof that the global media are in the hands of the perpetrators"

Russian Gulag survivor, novelist, historian, and short story writer. A. Solzhenitsyn - Gulag Archipelago

Dechucka
Guest

Sun Sep 29, 2019 9:45 am   



snip

Quote:
Watch out Pizzle, don't the Jews control the traffic lights?

More importantly "our" media

How do they do this? Who are the Jews behind it, maybe Soros? BTW you do
know Thunburg is a Jewish name shortened from Thunburgstein don't you?

Thunburg maybe don't think so


What don't you think?
>

keithr0
Guest

Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:45 am   



On 9/28/2019 9:22 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quote:
On 28/09/2019 7:25 pm, news18 wrote:
On Sat, 28 Sep 2019 12:31:42 +1000, Sylvia Else wrote:

On 28/09/2019 8:49 am, Je�us wrote:
"Traffic and transport infrastructure, ATMs, and environmental
infrastructure get green light to connect to nbn™ access network

NBN Co today announced that operators of traffic signals, automatic
teller machines and a range of other specialised devices can now
connect to select services over the nbn™ access network through their
retail service providers"

https://www.nbnco.com.au/corporate-information/media-centre/media-
statements/network-extensions


In theory, this shouldn't present that much of an issue. Take traffic
lights, for example.

The expectation is that the basic rules of operation that ensure that
only one direction gets green, and defines the period that a light stays
yellow/orange, are built into the system hardware/firmware, with the
latter only capable of being modified on site.

Might apply to HW designs, but I'm wondering how many are all but SW
these days.


If I wanted to do it in software, I'd have one[*] microcontroller that's
responsible for the control of the lights, and a separate one handling
the networking and communication. The latter is considerably more
complicated than the former.

Don't provide a way for the second one to update the first, so that the
first has to be updated on site (though why an update should ever be
necessary, is beyond me - how hard is it to get such things right in the
first place?).

Of course, the temptation is to use one processor for both, because
doing that saves money.

Sylvia

[*] Or 3, configured so that any 2 can determine which lights are on,
providing both redundancy and protection from a single one going rogue
due to a fault.


It's not rocket surgery, you sign all messages with a 2048 bit RSA
private key, that positively identifies the sender. Add a pseudo random
rolling code to prevent replay attacks and wrap the whole lot in a 256
bit AES. Not hard at all really, it just takes a bit more effort.

Sylvia Else
Guest

Mon Sep 30, 2019 12:45 pm   



On 30/09/2019 8:15 pm, keithr0 wrote:
Quote:
On 9/28/2019 9:22 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
On 28/09/2019 7:25 pm, news18 wrote:
On Sat, 28 Sep 2019 12:31:42 +1000, Sylvia Else wrote:

On 28/09/2019 8:49 am, Je�us wrote:
"Traffic and transport infrastructure, ATMs, and environmental
infrastructure get green light to connect to nbn™ access network

NBN Co today announced that operators of traffic signals, automatic
teller machines and a range of other specialised devices can now
connect to select services over the nbn™ access network through their
retail service providers"

https://www.nbnco.com.au/corporate-information/media-centre/media-
statements/network-extensions


In theory, this shouldn't present that much of an issue. Take traffic
lights, for example.

The expectation is that the basic rules of operation that ensure that
only one direction gets green, and defines the period that a light
stays
yellow/orange, are built into the system hardware/firmware, with the
latter only capable of being modified on site.

Might apply to HW designs, but I'm wondering how many are all but SW
these days.


If I wanted to do it in software, I'd have one[*] microcontroller
that's responsible for the control of the lights, and a separate one
handling the networking and communication. The latter is considerably
more complicated than the former.

Don't provide a way for the second one to update the first, so that
the first has to be updated on site (though why an update should ever
be necessary, is beyond me - how hard is it to get such things right
in the first place?).

Of course, the temptation is to use one processor for both, because
doing that saves money.

Sylvia

[*] Or 3, configured so that any 2 can determine which lights are on,
providing both redundancy and protection from a single one going rogue
due to a fault.

It's not rocket surgery, you sign all messages with a 2048 bit RSA
private key, that positively identifies the sender. Add a pseudo random
rolling code to prevent replay attacks and wrap the whole lot in a 256
bit AES. Not hard at all really, it just takes a bit more effort.


The problem here is that then it's only as secure as the private key is,
which means that the integrity of the traffic light system depends on
hackers not getting access to the key.

Given that it shouldn't be necessary to update the critical firmware
anyway, other than for things like changes to speed limits (affects the
yellow/orange timing), which are local in nature, it's far safer just
not to allow remote updates at all.

Sylvia.

keithr0
Guest

Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:45 am   



On 9/30/2019 9:28 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quote:
On 30/09/2019 8:15 pm, keithr0 wrote:
On 9/28/2019 9:22 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
On 28/09/2019 7:25 pm, news18 wrote:
On Sat, 28 Sep 2019 12:31:42 +1000, Sylvia Else wrote:

On 28/09/2019 8:49 am, Je�us wrote:
"Traffic and transport infrastructure, ATMs, and environmental
infrastructure get green light to connect to nbn™ access network

NBN Co today announced that operators of traffic signals, automatic
teller machines and a range of other specialised devices can now
connect to select services over the nbn™ access network through their
retail service providers"

https://www.nbnco.com.au/corporate-information/media-centre/media-
statements/network-extensions


In theory, this shouldn't present that much of an issue. Take traffic
lights, for example.

The expectation is that the basic rules of operation that ensure that
only one direction gets green, and defines the period that a light
stays
yellow/orange, are built into the system hardware/firmware, with the
latter only capable of being modified on site.

Might apply to HW designs, but I'm wondering how many are all but SW
these days.


If I wanted to do it in software, I'd have one[*] microcontroller
that's responsible for the control of the lights, and a separate one
handling the networking and communication. The latter is considerably
more complicated than the former.

Don't provide a way for the second one to update the first, so that
the first has to be updated on site (though why an update should ever
be necessary, is beyond me - how hard is it to get such things right
in the first place?).

Of course, the temptation is to use one processor for both, because
doing that saves money.

Sylvia

[*] Or 3, configured so that any 2 can determine which lights are on,
providing both redundancy and protection from a single one going
rogue due to a fault.

It's not rocket surgery, you sign all messages with a 2048 bit RSA
private key, that positively identifies the sender. Add a pseudo
random rolling code to prevent replay attacks and wrap the whole lot
in a 256 bit AES. Not hard at all really, it just takes a bit more
effort.

The problem here is that then it's only as secure as the private key is,
which means that the integrity of the traffic light system depends on
hackers not getting access to the key.


If you can't defend your own system, you are stuffed, there are plenty
of ways of making such keys unobtainable to outsiders.

Quote:
Given that it shouldn't be necessary to update the critical firmware
anyway, other than for things like changes to speed limits (affects the
yellow/orange timing), which are local in nature, it's far safer just
not to allow remote updates at all.

Sylvia.



Ned Latham
Guest

Tue Oct 01, 2019 2:45 am   



Sylvia Else wrote:
> keithr0 wrote:

----snip----

Quote:
It's not rocket surgery, you sign all messages with a 2048 bit RSA
private key, that positively identifies the sender. Add a pseudo random
rolling code to prevent replay attacks and wrap the whole lot in a 256
bit AES. Not hard at all really, it just takes a bit more effort.

The problem here is that then it's only as secure as the private key is,
which means that the integrity of the traffic light system depends on
hackers not getting access to the key.

Given that it shouldn't be necessary to update the critical firmware
anyway, other than for things like changes to speed limits (affects the
yellow/orange timing), which are local in nature, it's far safer just
not to allow remote updates at all.


And that (the rarity of updates) is the deciding factor. Given that the
updates must be checked individually, onsite updates would probably be
cheaper than remote updates anyway.

Wotawonderfulworld
Guest

Tue Oct 01, 2019 2:45 am   



Dechucka <Dechucka1_at_hotmail.com> wrote in
news:Z_2dnUqYJOQ5LhPAnZ2dnUU7-KXNnZ2d_at_westnet.com.au:

Quote:
On 28/09/2019 11:05 am, Wotawonderfulworld wrote:
Dechucka <Dechucka1_at_hotmail.com> wrote in
news:M_GdnaNybZYwDhPAnZ2dnUU7-TnNnZ2d_at_westnet.com.au:

On 28/09/2019 8:49 am, Je�us wrote:
"Traffic and transport infrastructure, ATMs, and environmental
infrastructure get green light to connect to nbnâ„¢ access
network

NBN Co today announced that operators of traffic signals, automatic
teller machines and a range of other specialised devices can now
connect to select services over the nbnâ„¢ access network
through their retail service providers"

https://www.nbnco.com.au/corporate-information/media-centre/media-st
at ements/network-extensions


I can't see - buffering, buffering, buffering - any problems. Of
course I don't know anything about the NBN because living 1/2 way
between Sydney and Canberra we are so isolated that we are only
offered satellite. If you've got kids at school or uni + want to run
a business and want to work during the day/peak hours it is useless
because the packs don't give enough data. ADSL rules OK (sometimes)


Ah you must be a neighbour. Same problem, I miss the old adsl, all
you could eat for $29.95 pm and it loaded a web page so much quicker
than Sky Muster can, and now i get 80gig for $74,95 a month. OOohh so
lucky the NBN came here.

How much of that is off-peak? There are lots of plans that offer 150
Gb but when you look at them it is only 30Gb on peak. Even doing
research now most sites are hugely graphics heavy, most of them just
pretty corporate pictures, so it does take more download than it used
to.



There is a good 120gig odd in off peak, but at my age i don't sit up at
1:00am gamining, so offpeak is totally useless to me unless i decide to
start pirating movies..

So basically i'm paying over $1 a gig for the internet, with added pitiful
response time, after i had better response time and $29.95 unlimited.

I love the NBN, it really has opened up a class system in australia.

Dechucka
Guest

Tue Oct 01, 2019 2:45 am   



On 1/10/2019 11:11 am, Wotawonderfulworld wrote:
Quote:
Dechucka <Dechucka1_at_hotmail.com> wrote in
news:Z_2dnUqYJOQ5LhPAnZ2dnUU7-KXNnZ2d_at_westnet.com.au:

On 28/09/2019 11:05 am, Wotawonderfulworld wrote:
Dechucka <Dechucka1_at_hotmail.com> wrote in
news:M_GdnaNybZYwDhPAnZ2dnUU7-TnNnZ2d_at_westnet.com.au:

On 28/09/2019 8:49 am, Je�us wrote:
"Traffic and transport infrastructure, ATMs, and environmental
infrastructure get green light to connect to nbnâ„¢ access
network

NBN Co today announced that operators of traffic signals, automatic
teller machines and a range of other specialised devices can now
connect to select services over the nbnâ„¢ access network
through their retail service providers"

https://www.nbnco.com.au/corporate-information/media-centre/media-st
at ements/network-extensions


I can't see - buffering, buffering, buffering - any problems. Of
course I don't know anything about the NBN because living 1/2 way
between Sydney and Canberra we are so isolated that we are only
offered satellite. If you've got kids at school or uni + want to run
a business and want to work during the day/peak hours it is useless
because the packs don't give enough data. ADSL rules OK (sometimes)


Ah you must be a neighbour. Same problem, I miss the old adsl, all
you could eat for $29.95 pm and it loaded a web page so much quicker
than Sky Muster can, and now i get 80gig for $74,95 a month. OOohh so
lucky the NBN came here.

How much of that is off-peak? There are lots of plans that offer 150
Gb but when you look at them it is only 30Gb on peak. Even doing
research now most sites are hugely graphics heavy, most of them just
pretty corporate pictures, so it does take more download than it used
to.



There is a good 120gig odd in off peak, but at my age i don't sit up at
1:00am gamining, so offpeak is totally useless to me unless i decide to
start pirating movies..

So basically i'm paying over $1 a gig for the internet, with added pitiful
response time, after i had better response time and $29.95 unlimited.

I love the NBN, it really has opened up a class system in australia.


Luckily I have the time so ADSL is OK for me. I suppose one day I'll be
forced onto satellite Sad

keithr0
Guest

Thu Oct 03, 2019 7:45 am   



On 9/29/2019 9:58 AM, Computer Nerd Kev wrote:
Quote:
In aus.electronics Sylvia Else <sylvia_at_email.invalid> wrote:
On 28/09/2019 7:25 pm, news18 wrote:
On Sat, 28 Sep 2019 12:31:42 +1000, Sylvia Else wrote:

The expectation is that the basic rules of operation that ensure that
only one direction gets green, and defines the period that a light stays
yellow/orange, are built into the system hardware/firmware, with the
latter only capable of being modified on site.

Might apply to HW designs, but I'm wondering how many are all but SW
these days.


If I wanted to do it in software, I'd have one[*] microcontroller that's
responsible for the control of the lights, and a separate one handling
the networking and communication. The latter is considerably more
complicated than the former.

From the link that I posted earlier about a system hacked in the US:
"The main components of wirelessly networked traffic lights are:
Sensors that detect cars and inspect infrastructure. Those sensors
are generally connected to traffic controllers that read the inputs
and control light states. Those controllers, usually in a metal
cabinet by the roadside, communicate with each other and a central
server. Radios, operating at 900 MHz or 5.8 GHz, are frequently
used for wireless communication in point-to-point or
point-to-multipoint configurations.

-Then there's malfunction
management units (MMUs) that can override the controller if there
are conflicting green lights and force traffic lights into a
"known-safe configuration" like blinking red lights."
https://www.csoonline.com/article/2466551/hacking-traffic-lights-with-a-laptop-is-easy.html

What made that hack so easy wasn't just that they were using
unencrypted wifi to communicate with/between traffic lights, but they
were using the default password which was printed in the manual!

The use of "MMUs" indicates that the hardware designers _might_ have
had an idea of what they're doing, but the software designers and
system installers certainly weren't considering hacking at all.

Who knows what the state of the industry is in Australia.


Hackers are people who exploit others fuckups. Don't fuckup and you
don't get hacked. These people fucked up on so many levels that they
deserved to get hacked.

Sylvia Else
Guest

Thu Oct 03, 2019 7:45 am   



On 3/10/2019 3:54 pm, keithr0 wrote:
Quote:
On 9/29/2019 9:58 AM, Computer Nerd Kev wrote:
In aus.electronics Sylvia Else <sylvia_at_email.invalid> wrote:
On 28/09/2019 7:25 pm, news18 wrote:
On Sat, 28 Sep 2019 12:31:42 +1000, Sylvia Else wrote:

The expectation is that the basic rules of operation that ensure that
only one direction gets green, and defines the period that a light
stays
yellow/orange, are built into the system hardware/firmware, with the
latter only capable of being modified on site.

Might apply to HW designs, but I'm wondering how many are all but SW
these days.


If I wanted to do it in software, I'd have one[*] microcontroller that's
responsible for the control of the lights, and a separate one handling
the networking and communication. The latter is considerably more
complicated than the former.

 From the link that I posted earlier about a system hacked in the US:
"The main components of wirelessly networked traffic lights are:
  Sensors that detect cars and inspect infrastructure. Those sensors
  are generally connected to traffic controllers that read the inputs
  and control light states. Those controllers, usually in a metal
  cabinet by the roadside, communicate with each other and a central
  server. Radios, operating at 900 MHz or 5.8 GHz, are frequently
  used for wireless communication in point-to-point or
  point-to-multipoint configurations.

-Then there's malfunction
  management units (MMUs) that can override the controller if there
  are conflicting green lights and force traffic lights into a
  "known-safe configuration" like blinking red lights."
https://www.csoonline.com/article/2466551/hacking-traffic-lights-with-a-laptop-is-easy.html


What made that hack so easy wasn't just that they were using
unencrypted wifi to communicate with/between traffic lights, but they
were using the default password which was printed in the manual!

The use of "MMUs" indicates that the hardware designers _might_ have
had an idea of what they're doing, but the software designers and
system installers certainly weren't considering hacking at all.

Who knows what the state of the industry is in Australia.

Hackers are people who exploit others fuckups. Don't fuckup and you
don't get hacked. These people fucked up on so many levels that they
deserved to get hacked.


Do other people deserve to get their lives messed up in consequence.

The aviation industry might originally have taken the view that
mechanics should install parts the right way around. After all, how hard
can it be?

But eventually, after people died, it became realised that it was better
just to make it impossible to install parts the wrong way around.

Mind you, even that doesn't always work. A non-return valve was found
installed the wrong way around in a crashed aircraft. The valve had an
interference pin designed into it to ensure that it could not be
installed backwards. It was determined that someone had cut it to make
it shorter - apparently because they could get it to fit otherwise.

Still, the principle remains valid. The less scope there is for making
mistakes, the fewer mistakes will be made, whether due to human
fallibility, or just incompetence.

Sylvia.

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