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weather instrument barograph ink resource and pen modificati

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Lucifer
Guest

Fri Jan 31, 2020 9:45 am   



On Mon, 27 Jan 2020 09:04:11 -0500, J-J <none_at_none.non> wrote:

Quote:
Picked up a 1972 Taylor barograph. This is a weather instrument with an
electronic rotating drum. On the drum is taped a chart and, in
combination with a "pen" (of sorts), barometric pressure is recorded.
After a week, the charts are removed and replaced with a fresh one.


I have one that records barometric pressure, temperature, and
humidity, and the drum is clockwork.

J-J
Guest

Fri Jan 31, 2020 5:45 pm   



Ok, an update. Unfortunately, here's what happened after trying an oil
based ink from Staples. It almost seems like there was a "hemorrhage"
of sorts, then almost nothing (in fact, I didn't even realize there was
any trace at all until uploading the photo... I did turn the drum a day
ahead to get past the huge ink spot):

https://imgur.com/a/GcYaO8c

So, I guess it boils down to the incorrect ink, incorrect paper, or
both. For the chart, I printed my own on standard 8.5x14 printer/
typing paper. I did back the paper with two pieces of packing tape just
in case a spot like the one shown appeared so at least it wouldn't stain
the drum.

I'm just not going to be able to get away with testing this thing for
under $10, am I?


Guest

Fri Jan 31, 2020 6:45 pm   



On Friday, 31 January 2020 16:01:26 UTC, J-J wrote:

Quote:
Ok, an update. Unfortunately, here's what happened after trying an oil
based ink from Staples. It almost seems like there was a "hemorrhage"
of sorts, then almost nothing (in fact, I didn't even realize there was
any trace at all until uploading the photo... I did turn the drum a day
ahead to get past the huge ink spot):

https://imgur.com/a/GcYaO8c

So, I guess it boils down to the incorrect ink, incorrect paper, or
both. For the chart, I printed my own on standard 8.5x14 printer/
typing paper. I did back the paper with two pieces of packing tape just
in case a spot like the one shown appeared so at least it wouldn't stain
the drum.

I'm just not going to be able to get away with testing this thing for
under $10, am I?


If you're willing to experiment. I gave you a clay-free rubber stamp ink formula that costs nothing to make. I've not tried it in your app.


NT

J-J
Guest

Sat Feb 01, 2020 9:45 pm   



On 1/31/20 11:48 AM, tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Friday, 31 January 2020 16:01:26 UTC, J-J wrote:

Ok, an update. Unfortunately, here's what happened after trying an oil
based ink from Staples. It almost seems like there was a "hemorrhage"
of sorts, then almost nothing (in fact, I didn't even realize there was
any trace at all until uploading the photo... I did turn the drum a day
ahead to get past the huge ink spot):

https://imgur.com/a/GcYaO8c

So, I guess it boils down to the incorrect ink, incorrect paper, or
both. For the chart, I printed my own on standard 8.5x14 printer/
typing paper. I did back the paper with two pieces of packing tape just
in case a spot like the one shown appeared so at least it wouldn't stain
the drum.

I'm just not going to be able to get away with testing this thing for
under $10, am I?

If you're willing to experiment. I gave you a clay-free rubber stamp ink formula that costs nothing to make. I've not tried it in your app.


NT


Yes, I guess you did. Unfortunately, I don't think I have any of that
stuff on hand. All I might be able to obtain is mineral oil later
today. Maybe I could try mixing a drop of that with the ink?

Well, the good news is that a VERY thin trace was made over a one day
period using nothing other than the Staples oil based ink and my packing
taped backed printer paper. Enough of a trace with falling barometric
pressure that I could see that the barograph at least works. I would
still like to get week's trace out of it though. I suspect the paper
I've devised isn't very absorbent, so any cheap modifications I could
try in a pinch would be welcome. Perhaps doubling (or tripling) up the
sheets next time around?

J-J
Guest

Sat Feb 01, 2020 9:45 pm   



On 1/27/20 9:22 AM, tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Monday, 27 January 2020 14:04:16 UTC, J-J wrote:
Picked up a 1972 Taylor barograph. This is a weather instrument with an
electronic rotating drum. On the drum is taped a chart and, in
combination with a "pen" (of sorts), barometric pressure is recorded.
After a week, the charts are removed and replaced with a fresh one.

I picked this up surplus with the hopes of reselling, but I am having
trouble with two things: 1) sourcing a *cheap* slow drying ink, and 2)
possible pen woes.

I'm posting here because the rotating drum is, after all, electronic.
In other words, it does not use a wind up key, but electronic mechanism
and initial tests show that at least it appears to be rotating correctly
and on time.

However, just for testing, I cannot seem to find a low cost slow drying
ink. There is "barograph ink", but it is quite expensive for a tiny
amount. I know there must be alternative slow drying inks out there
with different names at less cost that might be suitable. Any
suggestions would be welcome here.

Another thing I want to work on is the pen. The original is a tiny,
triangular shaped stainless steel reservoir. A drop of ink is placed in
the reservoir and this lasts until empty. There are alternative "pens"
that are felt tipped, require no ink, and last up to two years... but
again expensive. I'm wondering if I might be able to modify or use a
standard felt pen from the store somehow in this application. Further
suggestions appreciated.

Thank you,
JJ

The first question is what inky materials do you have on hand? If you can dissolve one in oil, paraffin, diesel or any mixture of those, great. Last time I did this I was using printer's ink plus paraffin. Inks applied in small enough amounts don't need to dry at all, the liquid part just soaks into the paper.

I doubt an ordinary felt tip would work. You could sleeve the tip in plastic to try it, but I'm not optimistic. Most likely it'll run into the paper, and the paper will tear.

Oh, I remember an ink experiment ... vegetable oil & powder toner. Soot is also usable but not nearly as convenient, as there is the issue of particle size.

Anyway, why not use a biro?


NT


What's a biro?

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Mon Feb 03, 2020 4:45 am   



On Fri, 31 Jan 2020 11:01:21 -0500, J-J <none_at_none.non> wrote:

Quote:
Ok, an update. Unfortunately, here's what happened after trying an oil
based ink from Staples. It almost seems like there was a "hemorrhage"
of sorts, then almost nothing (in fact, I didn't even realize there was
any trace at all until uploading the photo... I did turn the drum a day
ahead to get past the huge ink spot):

https://imgur.com/a/GcYaO8c


<https://www.metcheck.co.uk/blogs/barographs/156686919-how-to-get-a-good-barogram>
All the items mentioned apply.

I was using and recommending ink absorbent paper. According to the
above URL, that's wrong. It did work for me, but wasn't very good
looking. However, it didn't create a huge ink blob. At this point, I
don't know exactly what is wrong. It could be wrong ink, wrong type
of paper, bad nib spacing in the pen, bent nibs, etc. Dunno. I don't
have a barograph handy for testing.
--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

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