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WD-40 to clean electric contacts?

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pfjw@aol.com
Guest

Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:45 pm   



Phil:

As one who is unencumbered by the Thought Process, I guessed you would be the first to chime in with all the myths and magic attributed to a rather mundane product. Here IS what it IS:

https://www.wd40.com/files/pdf/msds-wd482671453.pdf

Aliphatic Hydrocarbon 64742-47-8 45-50
Petroleum Base Oil 64742-58-1
64742-53-6
64742-56-9
64742-65-0
<25
LVP Aliphatic Hydrocarbon 64742-47-8 12-18
Surfactant Proprietary <2
Non-Hazardous Ingredients Mixture <10%

Now go here:
https://www.cas.org/support/documentation/chemical-substances/faqs

That explains what those numbers are, and how you may trace them.

https://chem.nlm.nih.gov/chemidplus/rn/64742-53-6

Here is one to start you off.

Find me one of those CAS numbers that is not a 100% volatile compound.

Distillates (petroleum), solvent-dewaxed heavy paraffinic - note "DEWAXED" - the wax being the only part that would be non-volatile.

Also, whilst you are at it, show me one part or piece that is a CLEANER. There is a surfactant to reduce surface tension between ingredients and help it spread on a surface. Which is quite distinct from a cleaning agent - unless you see rinsing as cleaning. Which it is not.

And, of course, anything that is 100% volatile over the short term is by nature not a lubricant. What good is a non-persistent lubricant? Even water can do that. Or Oil of Wintergreen (Methyl salicylate) which is a nifty temporary lubricant, if one can stand the smell.

As to Fader Lube, much as I dislike Caig as a company, it ain't half-bad stuff as a persistent control lubricant.

Repeat: Unencumbered by the Thought Process.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Phil Allison
Guest

Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:45 pm   



pf...@aol.com wrote:

Quote:
Phil:



** Do not call me "Phil" you posturing asshole.




Quote:
As one who is unencumbered by the Thought Process,


** Describes bullshitting idiots like YOU perfectly.

For the readers:

WD-40 is a mixture a hydrocarbon solvent that evaporates quite rapidly and a light mineral oil that does not.

Take no notice of the troll calling itself pf - cos he is the worst kind of fool.



..... Phil

pfjw@aol.com
Guest

Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:45 pm   



Please note the interpolations:

On Monday, January 21, 2019 at 3:27:22 PM UTC-5, Phil Allison wrote:
Quote:
pf...@aol.com wrote:

Phil:



** Do not call me "Phil" you posturing asshole.


OK - Hey Twit:
Quote:



As one who is unencumbered by the Thought Process,


** Describes bullshitting idiots like YOU perfectly.

For the readers:

WD-40 is a mixture a hydrocarbon solvent that evaporates quite rapidly and a light mineral oil that does not.


Not according to the MSDS. You suggest differently. Show us. The CAS numbers are all there for you to prove your point - which may respond to proper tonsorial attention, or it may not.

Quote:

Take no notice of the troll calling itself pf - cos he is the worst kind of fool.



.... Twit


Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Phil Allison
Guest

Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:45 pm   



pf...@aol.com wrote:


Quote:


Phil:



** Do not call me "Phil" you posturing asshole.


OK - Hey Twit:


** You are bullshitting asshole and vile troll.




Quote:


As one who is unencumbered by the Thought Process,


** Describes bullshitting idiots like YOU perfectly.

For the readers:

WD-40 is a mixture a hydrocarbon solvent that evaporates quite rapidly and a light mineral oil that does not.

Not according to the MSDS.


** Bullshit.



Quote:

Peter Wieck = ASSHOLE & total fuckhead

Melrose Park, PA


+++ATH0
Guest

Tue Jan 22, 2019 6:45 am   



On 2019-01-21 12:10, pfjw_at_aol.com wrote:

Quote:
Find me one of those CAS numbers that is not a 100% volatile compound.


How hot do you have to get it for this to happen?

pfjw@aol.com
Guest

Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:45 pm   



On Monday, January 21, 2019 at 11:59:14 PM UTC-5, +++ATH0 wrote:
Quote:
On 2019-01-21 12:10, pfjw_at_aol.com wrote:

Find me one of those CAS numbers that is not a 100% volatile compound.


How hot do you have to get it for this to happen?


How do you mean? Volatile at normal (room) temperatures. You may test this for yourself using a paper-towel. Anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours, depending on immediate conditions.

Of course it takes longer in cool weather and so forth.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Allodoxaphobia
Guest

Tue Jan 22, 2019 4:45 pm   



Truly, WD-40 is very successful Troll Bait in s.e.r.

John Robertson
Guest

Tue Jan 22, 2019 7:45 pm   



On 2019/01/22 4:02 a.m., pfjw_at_aol.com wrote:
Quote:
On Monday, January 21, 2019 at 11:59:14 PM UTC-5, +++ATH0 wrote:
On 2019-01-21 12:10, pfjw_at_aol.com wrote:

Find me one of those CAS numbers that is not a 100% volatile compound.


How hot do you have to get it for this to happen?

How do you mean? Volatile at normal (room) temperatures. You may test this for yourself using a paper-towel. Anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours, depending on immediate conditions.


I would think that spraying it on a clear sheet of glass would show up
any residue better than paper towel...

Quote:

Of course it takes longer in cool weather and so forth.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


John :-#)#

pfjw@aol.com
Guest

Tue Jan 22, 2019 9:45 pm   



On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 1:43:49 PM UTC-5, John Robertson wrote:

Quote:
I would think that spraying it on a clear sheet of glass would show up
any residue better than paper towel...


Yes, and no. There are at least six (6) fractions in WD-40. The most persistent of which is a dewaxed light mineral spirit. That will take the longest to evaporate. A paper towel has the virtue of wicking all the fractions, thereby speeding the process.

64742-65-0 is the CAS number. And, if followed, it is named "Adriatic Spindle Oil". Trace it further, it is a non-staining, non-gumming material used for high-speed spindle lubrication. Trace it further, and where I have used it directly in my past, it is used in testing turbine seals at very high speed (10,000 - 50,000 rpm). That material would be the clear quill (100% single-fraction, undiluted). The material is injected constantly into the seal, and not recirculated. If none passed the seal, the seal passed (pun intended). The seal face is graphite, and self-lubricating, the spindle oil being a "visible air", air being used for static testing. As it is thinner than any turbine oil, it is very good for dynamic testing.

In any case, we kept the containers sealed tightly as the stuff would evaporate otherwise, and was not at all cheap in the quantities used.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Dave Platt
Guest

Wed Jan 23, 2019 2:45 am   



In article <a08e4efa-735a-4141-8d6a-505307d0ef91_at_googlegroups.com>,
pfjw_at_aol.com <peterwieck33_at_gmail.com> wrote:
X-Newsreader: trn 4.0-test77 (Sep 1, 2010)

Quote:
On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 1:43:49 PM UTC-5, John Robertson wrote:

I would think that spraying it on a clear sheet of glass would show up
any residue better than paper towel...


Yes, and no. There are at least six (6) fractions in WD-40. The most persistent of which is a dewaxed light mineral spirit. That will take the longest to
evaporate. A paper towel has the virtue of wicking all the fractions, thereby speeding the process.

64742-65-0 is the CAS number. And, if followed, it is named
"Adriatic Spindle Oil".


For what it's worth, I was curious about the "LVP aliphatic
hydrocarbon" fraction (since it's a "low vapor pressure" material).
This CAS (64742-47-Cool turns out to have a vapor pressure of a couple
of mm of mercury, and a volatility of 0.18 relative to butyl acetate.

According to another site, water has a relative volatility of 0.3 on
this scale, mineral spirits 0.1. So, this fraction of WD-40
evaporates faster than mineral spirits but slower than water. Hence,
"volatile", but not highly volatile (naptha is 1.4, acetone is 5.6).

For 64742-65-0, there seem to be a number of differently-named
products which fall into this category. For most of them the MSDS
says that the evaporation rate is "unavailable" or "n/a". The only
actual number I found is for a product which contains more than 90% of
this oil, and it lists the relative evaporation rate as <.01.

So, volatile in principle, but pretty slowly - less than a tenth the
rate of mineral spirits, less than 3% that of water. In practice I'd
guess that this means "hours to days" rather than "minutes". Maybe
about like lamp-oil kerosene?

Whether any of these fractions contain some small amount of long-chain
residuals that will hang around for weeks or months... I do not know.
Due to the fact that these CAS numbers often cover a fairly broad
range of products, and due to the fact that petroleum distillation
usually doesn't produce anything like a chemically-pure product, one
would probably have to test an individual batch of WD-40 to know for
certain how it would behave under various conditions of evaporation.

pfjw@aol.com
Guest

Wed Jan 23, 2019 2:45 pm   



On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 7:51:54 PM UTC-5, Dave Platt wrote:

Quote:
Whether any of these fractions contain some small amount of long-chain
residuals that will hang around for weeks or months... I do not know.
Due to the fact that these CAS numbers often cover a fairly broad
range of products, and due to the fact that petroleum distillation
usually doesn't produce anything like a chemically-pure product, one
would probably have to test an individual batch of WD-40 to know for
certain how it would behave under various conditions of evaporation.

Snippage


All pretty much true - but understanding the mechanics of evaporation does help.

Aliphatic Hydrocarbon 64742-47-8 45%-50%

Petroleum Base Oil <25%
64742-58-1
64742-53-6
64742-56-9
64742-65-0
NOTE: Five (5) Fractions making that <25%. And these are chain molecules, not ring molecule. Makes a difference.

LVP Aliphatic Hydrocarbon 64742-47-8 12%-18%

Surfactant Proprietary <2%

Non-Hazardous Ingredients Mixture <10%


Now the science: We have a solution of high and low volatility materials. For simplicity, lets stick with a simple solution of two miscible hydrocarbons, one LVP, one as volatile as say - V&PM Naptha.

1. The Naptha in your solution will evaporate at a constant rate.

2. The evaporation rate of the LVP will vary depending on the concentration of the mixture, but will always be higher than the evaporation rate of pure LVP, causing the Naptha/LVP mixture to evaporate faster.

3. The Naptha concentration will decrease with time, and there will always be a solution of pure LVP as the Naptha will completely evaporate first.

Now, consider WD40 is a mixture of many compounds, and although more complicated a system than just two compounds, as a system, it is (and will remain) 100% volatile in a relatively shorter period of time than any one compound in the system. If the highest concentration also happens to be the most volatile fraction, that will materially affect overall evaporation speed.

The general branch of science on this is called "Mixed Solvent Evaporation"..

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Cursitor Doom
Guest

Wed Jan 23, 2019 4:45 pm   



On Wed, 23 Jan 2019 05:19:29 -0800, pfjw_at_aol.com wrote:

Quote:
The general branch of science on this is called "Mixed Solvent
Evaporation".


I think this is why proprietary release agents stink when compared to
home brew mixtures of thin oils and volatile solvents. Always make a
fresh batch just prior to use. Makes all the difference.





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gregz
Guest

Thu Jan 24, 2019 9:45 am   



"pfjw_at_aol.com" <peterwieck33_at_gmail.com> wrote:
Quote:
On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 1:43:49 PM UTC-5, John Robertson wrote:

I would think that spraying it on a clear sheet of glass would show up
any residue better than paper towel...


Yes, and no. There are at least six (6) fractions in WD-40. The most
persistent of which is a dewaxed light mineral spirit. That will take the
longest to evaporate. A paper towel has the virtue of wicking all the
fractions, thereby speeding the process.

64742-65-0 is the CAS number. And, if followed, it is named "Adriatic
Spindle Oil". Trace it further, it is a non-staining, non-gumming
material used for high-speed spindle lubrication. Trace it further, and
where I have used it directly in my past, it is used in testing turbine
seals at very high speed (10,000 - 50,000 rpm). That material would be
the clear quill (100% single-fraction, undiluted). The material is
injected constantly into the seal, and not recirculated. If none passed
the seal, the seal passed (pun intended). The seal face is graphite, and
self-lubricating, the spindle oil being a "visible air", air being used
for static testing. As it is thinner than any turbine oil, it is very
good for dynamic testing.

In any case, we kept the containers sealed tightly as the stuff would
evaporate otherwise, and was not at all cheap in the quantities used.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


A spectrum test reveled an amount of bug juice. Can't say what bug, might
be a Variation of stink bug LOL.

Greg

gregz
Guest

Thu Jan 24, 2019 9:45 am   



John Robertson <spam_at_flippers.com> wrote:
Quote:
On 2019/01/20 11:09 a.m., Martin Gregorie wrote:
On Sun, 20 Jan 2019 10:21:01 -0800, joefed54 wrote:
i find the stuff very helpful for freeing up stubborn automotive
fasteners (this comment will itself will bring out a completely
different breed of haters ... rave on haters, i didn't say it was the
BEST).
it is also REALLY good for removing sticky goo.
WD-40 is very good for blasting dirt and fine sand out of the clockwork
timers used to stop the engine and dethermalise competition free flight
model aircraft after they've landed in mud or dust piles, but there are
drawbacks:
- if you've cleaned the timer with WD-40 after one flight,
its a very good idea to repeat the the treatment after every following
one.

That sounds like an argument to find a better product. Obviously the WD
is gumming up the works and now you have to use it to enable the solvents
to loosen up the goo.

- remember to strip the timer and clean it thoroughly before the next
competition or trimming session.

Clean out the WD-40 residue I assume. There are much better aerosol
lubricants developed for the electronics industry that a spray to prevent
rust. Why not use one of those? MG Chemicals for one makes a variety of
lubricant cleaners that leave no residue to seize up the works...

Failure to do both of these is very likely to cause the timer to run slow
or stop next time you fly the model. The likely result in case is a crash
or losing the model upwards in a thermal.

Because the WD-40 is gumming up the works.

Why not use salad oil, or anything else that is a liquid when warm but congeals later?

IOW, WD-40 is useful stuff but you *must* know its side effects and take
steps to mitigate them every time you use it.

WD-40 should only be used when you don't have access to better products,
then wash it out carefully and use the correct product. I have fixed
enough games gummed up through the use of WD-40 that I would prefer to
never see that gunk again.

John :-#)#


Never saw gumming after decades.

Greg

pfjw@aol.com
Guest

Thu Jan 24, 2019 1:45 pm   



On Thursday, January 24, 2019 at 3:41:19 AM UTC-5, GS wrote:

Quote:
Never saw gumming after decades.

Greg


The issue with free-flight two and four-stroke diesel glow engines is that the general lubricant is either a PAG based oil, or castor oil, typically from 17% to as much as 25% of the fuel (the rest being Methanol and often but not always nitromethane). Not all of this oil burns. The residue that has not been reduced to hard varnish is soluble in WD-40. Rinsing with WD-40 and not completely removing the residue spreads it thinly all over everything - which then promptly gums up as the WD-40 dissipates.

It is not the fault of the WD-40, but of the user, for not using enough.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

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