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WD-40 to clean electric contacts?

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Phil Allison
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 2:09 am   



Micky wrote:
Quote:


I have this vague recollection that WD-40 is good to clean electric
contacts?? Either that or it's bad for them.



** WD40 is excellent at making bad contacts good again.

Switches, connectors and pots are all examples.


..... Phil

Phil Allison
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 2:10 am   



Sjouke Burry wrote:
Quote:


Trying it, will certainly not make things worse.
And cleaning/flooding the switch a day or two later with
something volatile,(alcohol,turpentine or such) will take
care of the wd40 residue(maybe).



** No need to do that, the reside is just light mineral oil.


..... Phil
> I don't think it will make things worse.

Phil Allison
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 2:16 am   



pf...@aol.com wrote:

Quote:
A few things on WD-40.


** So a few lies from this norotious WD-40 hater.


Quote:
It is, essentially, stoddard solvent, that is highly refined
kerosene and a very small amount of very light mineral oil.


** WD-40 contains no kerosene and the oil content is 10-15 %.

Quote:
It is 100% volatile over time. Which is directly related to temperature.


** At room temp, that could means years.


Quote:

WD-40 is NOT a contact cleaner. What it does along those lines is by rinsing.


** So the same action as other contact cleaners.


Quote:
WD-40 is not a lubricant.


** Of course it is.




...... Phil

Phil Allison
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 2:18 am   



tabb...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:


Stoddard solvent is aka white spirit.



** Which is refined petrol, aka lighter fluid.




...... Phil

Phil Allison
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 2:22 am   



et...@whidbey.com wrote:
Quote:


WD-40 does not completely evaporate over time unless the temperature
is higher than that which is compatible with human life. It leaves a
kind of hard residue, almost like a very hard wax. A very thin
coating. Which, unless baked on, will be easily dissloved when next
doused with WD-40. I have had direct experience with this coating.


** Ever burn some oil in a fry pan ?

If you put WD-40 on parts that get hot, a similar residue forms.

It cleans off easily or dissolves in fresh WD-40 so is not a problem.

I see it on the pins of certain noval tubes from time to time.



..... Phil

rickman
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 3:08 am   



On 5/1/2017 12:39 PM, Sjouke Burry wrote:
Quote:
On 01.05.17 18:07, Micky wrote:

WD-40 to clean electric contacts?

I'm on vacation and renting a room, and my landlady has a combination
CD/Radio/Cassette?, very compact, portable, works well except fo the
little on/off/CD slide switch.

The switch doesn't easily make contact, even when pushed to and past
the On position. So it's hard to get the radio on, and it turns off
by itself in about 30 minutes. Moving the switch back and forth 10
times to clean it hasn't worked yet.

Normally what I would do is spray contact cleaner or tuner cleaner in
the switch from above, where the plastic slider that goes over the
switch is, And normally that doesn't accomplish much.

Even taking such things apart and spraying the switch from underneath
has taken longer to work than for rheostats, for example, and here I
don't want to take it apart. She's only my landlady.

I don't know where in this non-English-speaking country to buy
contact cleaner and she might balk at the extra money, but she does
have something in an aerosol can that looks mighty like WD-40.

I have this vague recollection that WD-40 is good to clean electric
contacts?? Either that or it's bad for them. Should I try it.

BTW, I want to use the radio, so that's one big reason I want it
fixed. When it stopped playing while she was there, she said, "Oh,
yeah, maybe that's why I bought another one" (She speaks English.)

Trying it, will certainly not make things worse.
And cleaning/flooding the switch a day or two later with
something volatile,(alcohol,turpentine or such) will take
care of the wd40 residue(maybe).
I don't think it will make things worse.


Very bad idea. Contact cleaner is specifically formulated for the job
and won't cause any harm to electronics. A friend used WD40 on some
very expensive chemical instrumentation as "preventive maintenance" and
the volatile solvents in it melted the shafts to the collars on the pots
freezing them. So he had a service call the next day where he had to
replace the pots he sprayed.

--

Rick C

rickman
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 3:15 am   



On 5/1/2017 8:09 PM, Phil Allison wrote:
Quote:

Micky wrote:


I have this vague recollection that WD-40 is good to clean electric
contacts?? Either that or it's bad for them.



** WD40 is excellent at making bad contacts good again.

Switches, connectors and pots are all examples.


Until you use it on one where the plastic bits dissolve and melt together.

--

Rick C

Phil Allison
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 3:26 am   



Prickman is a Liar wrote:

Quote:


I don't think it will make things worse.

Very bad idea.


** Lie number 1.


Quote:
Contact cleaner is specifically formulated for the job


** Lie number two.

Most so called "contact cleaners" are hopeless at fixing noisy switches and pots. The solvents use are too weak and evaporate so fast they do not do anything. Plus there is no residual oil to protect metal surfaces from corrosion.



Quote:
A friend used WD40 on some
very expensive chemical instrumentation ...



** Why is it always a "friend" who has weird experience with WD40 and never the person posting ??

Cos the story is a complete fabrication.



.... Phil

Phil Allison
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 3:31 am   



Prickman is a Liar wrote:

Quote:

Phil Allison wrote:

** WD40 is excellent at making bad contacts good again.

Switches, connectors and pots are all examples.


Until you use it on one where the plastic bits dissolve and melt together.



** Massive LIE !!

WD40 does not harm plastics used to make electronic or electrical components.

That is the oldest and STUPIDEST crock of shit trotted out by WD40 haters.

The Prickman is a parroting MORON.



..... Phil

Clifford Heath
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 8:48 am   



On 02/05/17 10:09, Phil Allison wrote:
Quote:
Micky wrote:
I have this vague recollection that WD-40 is good to clean electric
contacts?? Either that or it's bad for them.

** WD40 is excellent at making bad contacts good again.
Switches, connectors and pots are all examples.
.... Phil


I've been meaning to thank you for telling us that some months back.

In my Yamaha A-520 stereo amp, I've been putting up for several
years now with a noisy/intermittent balance pot for several years.
Only one channel working most of the time, and when you finally
get both to work, one was significantly louder than the other.
It looks like a big job to disassemble it enough to replace.

A quick squirt of WD-40 and it seems as good as new.
I wouldn't have done it on anyone else's recommendation.

Clifford Heath.

Ian Jackson
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 9:39 am   



In message <v6udnTMQQbl1JprEnZ2dnUU7-K-dnZ2d_at_giganews.com>, John
Robertson <spam_at_flippers.com> writes
Quote:
On 2017/05/01 1:24 PM, Wade Garrett wrote:
On 5/1/17 3:08 PM, Foxs Mercantile wrote:
On 5/1/2017 12:00 PM, Retired wrote:
According to WD-40's "List of 2000+ Uses" at
https://wd40.com/files/pdf/wd_40_2000_uses_updated_jan_2017.pdf
"• Cleans gunk from electrical contacts" is one of them

And most of the 2000 ideas are marketing hype.


You're a regular party-pooper!


Having cleaned the residue (glue like substance) of WD-40 from many an
electrical unit I would say that it's only practical use is for
preventing rust on tools.

Everything else is hype.

There are FAR better solvents out there than WD-40...and cheaper!

Cheaper than the old can you've had in the tool-shed for the last 20
years, but which has been your saviour on the odd occasion when you've
suddenly needed a general-purpose lubricant / switch cleaner / rusty nut
freer / corrosion inhibitor ?
>

--
Ian

Ian Jackson
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 9:45 am   



In message <oe8m0u$n9s$2_at_dont-email.me>, rickman <gnuarm_at_gmail.com>
writes
Quote:
On 5/1/2017 12:39 PM, Sjouke Burry wrote:
On 01.05.17 18:07, Micky wrote:

WD-40 to clean electric contacts?

I'm on vacation and renting a room, and my landlady has a combination
CD/Radio/Cassette?, very compact, portable, works well except fo the
little on/off/CD slide switch.

The switch doesn't easily make contact, even when pushed to and past
the On position. So it's hard to get the radio on, and it turns off
by itself in about 30 minutes. Moving the switch back and forth 10
times to clean it hasn't worked yet.

Normally what I would do is spray contact cleaner or tuner cleaner in
the switch from above, where the plastic slider that goes over the
switch is, And normally that doesn't accomplish much.

Even taking such things apart and spraying the switch from underneath
has taken longer to work than for rheostats, for example, and here I
don't want to take it apart. She's only my landlady.

I don't know where in this non-English-speaking country to buy
contact cleaner and she might balk at the extra money, but she does
have something in an aerosol can that looks mighty like WD-40.

I have this vague recollection that WD-40 is good to clean electric
contacts?? Either that or it's bad for them. Should I try it.

BTW, I want to use the radio, so that's one big reason I want it
fixed. When it stopped playing while she was there, she said, "Oh,
yeah, maybe that's why I bought another one" (She speaks English.)

Trying it, will certainly not make things worse.
And cleaning/flooding the switch a day or two later with
something volatile,(alcohol,turpentine or such) will take
care of the wd40 residue(maybe).
I don't think it will make things worse.

Very bad idea. Contact cleaner is specifically formulated for the job
and won't cause any harm to electronics. A friend used WD40 on some
very expensive chemical instrumentation as "preventive maintenance" and
the volatile solvents in it melted the shafts to the collars on the
pots freezing them. So he had a service call the next day where he had
to replace the pots he sprayed.

While I'm sure that there have been occasions when a squirt of WD40 has
dissolved everything in sight, I've been using it for decades, and I've
never found it has ever caused any such damage.
--
Ian

Phil Allison
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 10:11 am   



Clifford Heath wrote:
Quote:
Phil Allison wrote:

** WD40 is excellent at making bad contacts good again.
Switches, connectors and pots are all examples.


I've been meaning to thank you for telling us that some months back.

In my Yamaha A-520 stereo amp, I've been putting up for several
years now with a noisy/intermittent balance pot for several years.
Only one channel working most of the time, and when you finally
get both to work, one was significantly louder than the other.
It looks like a big job to disassemble it enough to replace.

A quick squirt of WD-40 and it seems as good as new.
I wouldn't have done it on anyone else's recommendation.



** Thanks or the vote of confidence.

Often, the effect of using a little WD40 is so quick and complete it seems almost magical.


..... Phil

gregz
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 10:22 am   



"pfjw_at_aol.com" <pfjw_at_aol.com> wrote:
Quote:
A few things on WD-40.

Its name means Water Displacement - 40th try.
It is, essentially, stoddard solvent, that is highly refined kerosene and
a very small amount of very light mineral oil.
It is 100% volatile over time. Which is directly related to temperature.
Most gunks and goos are soluble in WD-40. But, what is not rinsed away
will be evenly distributed when the solvent evaporates. So beware!
It is a rather gentle solvent, and does not attack most plastics or
finishes. *MOST*, not all!

WD-40 is NOT a contact cleaner. What it does along those lines is by rinsing.
WD-40 is not a lubricant. It will (temporarily) reconstitute some
lubricants under some conditions.

Good luck with it, you could do worse.


It does not displace water unless it's the blast. It floats on water. PB
Blaster displaces water.

Greg

pfjw@aol.com
Guest

Tue May 02, 2017 1:16 pm   



WD-40 is not designed to remove or protect against rust either. It is meant to *DISPLACE* dampness in the process of cleaning and protecting tools *with something else*.

Try the test.

WD-40 is neither voodoo, black magic nor a secret potion. It is a very simple compound designed for a few very basic purposes.

https://wd40.com/files/pdf/msds-wd482671453.pdf

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

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