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John Doe
Guest

Wed Nov 07, 2018 6:45 pm   



Disclaimer: I'm not looking for the best drone power supply. I enjoy
using high quality branded products. Of course it's all made in China.
That is IMO a good reason to pay close attention to branding. I intend
to pay VERY close attention to my battery pack temperature, and to take
the endeavor very slowly.

I have a spare Dewalt 20 V Max 6 amp hour battery, and a load of new
18650 batteries from an electric monowheel/unicycle I bought mainly for
the experience.

I would bet the 18650s in Dewalt's 9 amp hour FLEX VOLT would work, for
$200. I suppose trying to find those batteries would be impossible due
to lack of labeling.

I suppose one way to guess at discharge rates is to look at the
application the battery is meant for, the run time of the device. But of
course data is preferable.

Any resource for discharge rates of 18650 batteries?

Thanks.


Guest

Wed Nov 07, 2018 7:45 pm   



On a sunny day (Wed, 7 Nov 2018 17:24:14 -0000 (UTC)) it happened John Doe
<always.look_at_message.header> wrote in <prv73u$g3h$1_at_dont-email.me>:

Quote:
Disclaimer: I'm not looking for the best drone power supply. I enjoy
using high quality branded products. Of course it's all made in China.
That is IMO a good reason to pay close attention to branding. I intend
to pay VERY close attention to my battery pack temperature, and to take
the endeavor very slowly.

I have a spare Dewalt 20 V Max 6 amp hour battery, and a load of new
18650 batteries from an electric monowheel/unicycle I bought mainly for
the experience.

I would bet the 18650s in Dewalt's 9 amp hour FLEX VOLT would work, for
$200. I suppose trying to find those batteries would be impossible due
to lack of labeling.

I suppose one way to guess at discharge rates is to look at the
application the battery is meant for, the run time of the device. But of
course data is preferable.

Any resource for discharge rates of 18650 batteries?

Thanks.


Interesting, I have been trying just that,
those batteries to power my Hubsan drone.
First; there are many makes of 18650 batteries, with vastly different specs.
I bought 3 of the best I could find locally (expensive) was sold as 'Sony'
but I am sure it is some Chinese copy,
Anyways tried 2 in series and that gave me shorter flight time than 2 cell lipos.
Tried 3 in series with an ebay 10A stepdown switching regulator and the thing was to heavy to fly,
or the regulator limited at the >10A current required.
There is a youtube video of someone doing the same thing.
I still have the batteries but am back to lipos,
And 2 lipos in parallel works for up to 30 minutes it seems.

So look up the specs of your battery..

BTW I bought some big power resistors and use a DC ampere clamp-on meter
for battery duration tests, like this:
http://panteltje.com/pub/power_resistors_IMG_6291.JPG
big heatsink, resistors in series or parallel, 100 W each..
http://panteltje.com/pub/big_heatsink_IMG_6292.JPG

Or measure real drone current:
http://panteltje.com/pub/hubsan_h501s_current_test_full_throttle_IMG_6290.JPG
Posted some battery results in August 2017 to the hubsan group.

Ingvald44
Guest

Wed Nov 07, 2018 8:45 pm   



On Wed, 07 Nov 2018 18:20:01 GMT, <698839253X6D445TD_at_nospam.org>
wrote:

Quote:
On a sunny day (Wed, 7 Nov 2018 17:24:14 -0000 (UTC)) it happened John Doe
always.look_at_message.header> wrote in <prv73u$g3h$1_at_dont-email.me>:

Disclaimer: I'm not looking for the best drone power supply. I enjoy
using high quality branded products. Of course it's all made in China.
That is IMO a good reason to pay close attention to branding. I intend
to pay VERY close attention to my battery pack temperature, and to take
the endeavor very slowly.

I have a spare Dewalt 20 V Max 6 amp hour battery, and a load of new
18650 batteries from an electric monowheel/unicycle I bought mainly for
the experience.

I would bet the 18650s in Dewalt's 9 amp hour FLEX VOLT would work, for
$200. I suppose trying to find those batteries would be impossible due
to lack of labeling.

I suppose one way to guess at discharge rates is to look at the
application the battery is meant for, the run time of the device. But of
course data is preferable.

Any resource for discharge rates of 18650 batteries?

Thanks.

Interesting, I have been trying just that,
those batteries to power my Hubsan drone.
First; there are many makes of 18650 batteries, with vastly different specs.
I bought 3 of the best I could find locally (expensive) was sold as 'Sony'
but I am sure it is some Chinese copy,
Anyways tried 2 in series and that gave me shorter flight time than 2 cell lipos.
Tried 3 in series with an ebay 10A stepdown switching regulator and the thing was to heavy to fly,
or the regulator limited at the >10A current required.
There is a youtube video of someone doing the same thing.
I still have the batteries but am back to lipos,
And 2 lipos in parallel works for up to 30 minutes it seems.

So look up the specs of your battery..

BTW I bought some big power resistors and use a DC ampere clamp-on meter
for battery duration tests, like this:
http://panteltje.com/pub/power_resistors_IMG_6291.JPG
big heatsink, resistors in series or parallel, 100 W each..
http://panteltje.com/pub/big_heatsink_IMG_6292.JPG

Or measure real drone current:
http://panteltje.com/pub/hubsan_h501s_current_test_full_throttle_IMG_6290.JPG
Posted some battery results in August 2017 to the hubsan group.


The 18650 batts are interesting. Some are given ridiculous ratings..

.. 9000 mah is one. They check out at around 1000 mah. Good ones are
actually 3000 mah or so, get the unprotected ones so you can draw
current without it cutting out. I have a 20 volt pack I put together
for a Black and Decker leaf blower. It will now blow off my whole
lawn from one charge. I use a balance charger to keep it happy.

DLUNU
Guest

Wed Nov 07, 2018 8:45 pm   



<698839253X6D445TD_at_nospam.org> wrote in
news:prvact$87v$1_at_gioia.aioe.org:

Quote:
On a sunny day (Wed, 7 Nov 2018 17:24:14 -0000 (UTC)) it happened John
Doe <always.look_at_message.header> wrote in
prv73u$g3h$1_at_dont-email.me>:

Disclaimer: I'm not looking for the best drone power supply. I enjoy
using high quality branded products. Of course it's all made in China.
That is IMO a good reason to pay close attention to branding. I intend
to pay VERY close attention to my battery pack temperature, and to
take the endeavor very slowly.

I have a spare Dewalt 20 V Max 6 amp hour battery, and a load of new
18650 batteries from an electric monowheel/unicycle I bought mainly
for the experience.

I would bet the 18650s in Dewalt's 9 amp hour FLEX VOLT would work,
for $200. I suppose trying to find those batteries would be impossible
due to lack of labeling.

I suppose one way to guess at discharge rates is to look at the
application the battery is meant for, the run time of the device. But
of course data is preferable.

Any resource for discharge rates of 18650 batteries?

Thanks.

Interesting, I have been trying just that,
those batteries to power my Hubsan drone.
First; there are many makes of 18650 batteries, with vastly different
specs. I bought 3 of the best I could find locally (expensive) was
sold as 'Sony' but I am sure it is some Chinese copy,
Anyways tried 2 in series and that gave me shorter flight time than 2
cell lipos. Tried 3 in series with an ebay 10A stepdown switching
regulator and the thing was to heavy to fly, or the regulator limited
at the >10A current required. There is a youtube video of someone
doing the same thing. I still have the batteries but am back to lipos,
And 2 lipos in parallel works for up to 30 minutes it seems.

So look up the specs of your battery..

BTW I bought some big power resistors and use a DC ampere clamp-on
meter for battery duration tests, like this:
http://panteltje.com/pub/power_resistors_IMG_6291.JPG
big heatsink, resistors in series or parallel, 100 W each..
http://panteltje.com/pub/big_heatsink_IMG_6292.JPG

Or measure real drone current:
http://panteltje.com/pub/hubsan_h501s_current_test_full_throttle_IMG_
6
290.JPG
Posted some battery results in August 2017 to the hubsan group.





The 18650s are all made by maybee three major battery makers and
Panasonic is the best and was the originally contracted maker. The
units being dubbed any higher than 1200 mA/h are bogus.

If it were true, all cars would be electric by now. And powered by
little 4X original spec 18650s.

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Wed Nov 07, 2018 8:45 pm   



On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 17:24:14 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
<always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

Quote:
Disclaimer: I'm not looking for the best drone power supply.
(...)
I have a spare Dewalt 20 V Max 6 amp hour battery, and a load of new
18650 batteries from an electric monowheel/unicycle I bought mainly for
the experience.
(...)
Any resource for discharge rates of 18650 batteries?


Yeah:
<https://lygte-info.dk/info/indexBatteriesAndChargers%20UK.html>
<https://lygte-info.dk/review/batteries2012/Common18650Summary%20UK.html>
<https://www.candlepowerforums.com> (search for battery tests)
etc...

However, you're wasting your time trying to fly with 18650 cells.
There's a reason that most drones use LiPo cells. It's called
specific energy and energy density:
<https://greentransportation.info/energy-transportation/energy-density.html>
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_density>
LiPo is about 1.8MJ/kg while Lithium Ion is about 0.5MJ/kg. In other
words, you need about 3 times the weight in batteries to power your
drone with 18650 cells as you would with LiPo. Actually, more if you
include the weight of the steel outer casing on the 18650.

More later, after I'm done with todays plumbing project.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

John Doe
Guest

Wed Nov 07, 2018 10:45 pm   



https://youtu.be/9LbDtKsdS9w

Check out the first minute of that video.
Drones are freaking incredible.

Jasen Betts
Guest

Wed Nov 07, 2018 10:45 pm   



On 2018-11-07, DLUNU <DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_DLU.org> wrote:
Quote:
698839253X6D445TD_at_nospam.org> wrote in
news:prvact$87v$1_at_gioia.aioe.org:

On a sunny day (Wed, 7 Nov 2018 17:24:14 -0000 (UTC)) it happened John
Doe <always.look_at_message.header> wrote in
prv73u$g3h$1_at_dont-email.me>:

Disclaimer: I'm not looking for the best drone power supply. I enjoy
using high quality branded products. Of course it's all made in China.
That is IMO a good reason to pay close attention to branding. I intend
to pay VERY close attention to my battery pack temperature, and to
take the endeavor very slowly.

I have a spare Dewalt 20 V Max 6 amp hour battery, and a load of new
18650 batteries from an electric monowheel/unicycle I bought mainly
for the experience.

I would bet the 18650s in Dewalt's 9 amp hour FLEX VOLT would work,
for $200. I suppose trying to find those batteries would be impossible
due to lack of labeling.

I suppose one way to guess at discharge rates is to look at the
application the battery is meant for, the run time of the device. But
of course data is preferable.

Any resource for discharge rates of 18650 batteries?

Thanks.

Interesting, I have been trying just that,
those batteries to power my Hubsan drone.
First; there are many makes of 18650 batteries, with vastly different
specs. I bought 3 of the best I could find locally (expensive) was
sold as 'Sony' but I am sure it is some Chinese copy,
Anyways tried 2 in series and that gave me shorter flight time than 2
cell lipos. Tried 3 in series with an ebay 10A stepdown switching
regulator and the thing was to heavy to fly, or the regulator limited
at the >10A current required. There is a youtube video of someone
doing the same thing. I still have the batteries but am back to lipos,
And 2 lipos in parallel works for up to 30 minutes it seems.

So look up the specs of your battery..

BTW I bought some big power resistors and use a DC ampere clamp-on
meter for battery duration tests, like this:
http://panteltje.com/pub/power_resistors_IMG_6291.JPG
big heatsink, resistors in series or parallel, 100 W each..
http://panteltje.com/pub/big_heatsink_IMG_6292.JPG

Or measure real drone current:
http://panteltje.com/pub/hubsan_h501s_current_test_full_throttle_IMG_
6
290.JPG
Posted some battery results in August 2017 to the hubsan group.





The 18650s are all made by maybee three major battery makers and
Panasonic is the best and was the originally contracted maker. The
units being dubbed any higher than 1200 mA/h are bogus.


You gotta watch out for "fake" webasites like

https://na.industrial.panasonic.com/products/batteries/rechargeable-batteries/lithium-ion/series/cylindrical-series/CS474/model/NCR18650BF

Quote:
If it were true, all cars would be electric by now. And powered by
little 4X original spec 18650s.


I think you under-estimate innertia.

--
When I tried casting out nines I made a hash of it.

John Doe
Guest

Wed Nov 07, 2018 10:45 pm   



The idea I'm "wasting my time" implies I have a goal in mind. As
stated in my original post and quoted below... "I'm not looking for
the best drone power supply."


Jeff Liebermann <jeffl_at_cruzio.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 17:24:14 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

Disclaimer: I'm not looking for the best drone power supply.
(...)
I have a spare Dewalt 20 V Max 6 amp hour battery, and a load of new
18650 batteries from an electric monowheel/unicycle I bought mainly
for
the experience.
(...)
Any resource for discharge rates of 18650 batteries?

Yeah:
https://lygte-info.dk/info/indexBatteriesAndChargers%20UK.html
https://lygte-info.dk/review/batteries2012/Common18650Summary%
20UK.html
https://www.candlepowerforums.com> (search for battery tests)
etc...

However, you're wasting your time trying to fly with 18650 cells.
There's a reason that most drones use LiPo cells. It's called
specific energy and energy density:
https://greentransportation.info/energy-transportation/energy-
density.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_density
LiPo is about 1.8MJ/kg while Lithium Ion is about 0.5MJ/kg. In
other
words, you need about 3 times the weight in batteries to power your
drone with 18650 cells as you would with LiPo. Actually, more if
you
include the weight of the steel outer casing on the 18650.

More later, after I'm done with todays plumbing project.


Martin Riddle
Guest

Thu Nov 08, 2018 1:45 am   



On Wed, 07 Nov 2018 11:39:44 -0800, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl_at_cruzio.com>
wrote:

Quote:
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 17:24:14 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

Disclaimer: I'm not looking for the best drone power supply.
(...)
I have a spare Dewalt 20 V Max 6 amp hour battery, and a load of new
18650 batteries from an electric monowheel/unicycle I bought mainly for
the experience.
(...)
Any resource for discharge rates of 18650 batteries?

Yeah:
https://lygte-info.dk/info/indexBatteriesAndChargers%20UK.html
https://lygte-info.dk/review/batteries2012/Common18650Summary%20UK.html
https://www.candlepowerforums.com> (search for battery tests)
etc...

However, you're wasting your time trying to fly with 18650 cells.
There's a reason that most drones use LiPo cells. It's called
specific energy and energy density:
https://greentransportation.info/energy-transportation/energy-density.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_density
LiPo is about 1.8MJ/kg while Lithium Ion is about 0.5MJ/kg. In other
words, you need about 3 times the weight in batteries to power your
drone with 18650 cells as you would with LiPo. Actually, more if you
include the weight of the steel outer casing on the 18650.

More later, after I'm done with todays plumbing project.


Why do plumbing projects alway come up in November?

Cheers

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Thu Nov 08, 2018 2:45 am   



On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 20:45:39 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
<always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

Quote:
The idea I'm "wasting my time" implies I have a goal in mind. As
stated in my original post and quoted below... "I'm not looking for
the best drone power supply."


It's rather difficult for me to offer recommendations when all you
offer is what are NOT trying to do.

How to ask a question on Usenet and get a reasonable answer:
1. What problem are you trying to solve? No details or background.
Just a simple one or two lines explaining what you're trying to do.
2. What do you have to work with? Level of expertise, test
equipment, design abilities, experience, parts stash, and such.
3. What have you done so far, what happened, and where are you stuck?

Don't worry about wasting my time. Anything is better than plumbing.

Incidentally, have you look at what's inside the battery Dewalt 20v
battery pack?
<https://syonyk.blogspot.com/2016/09/dewalt-20v-max-30ah-battery-pack.html>
Quite a bit of info there.

I'm not an expert on building drones, but have had some experience
dealing with their power systems. I think you'll find that weight is
very important and that using heavy cylindrical cells is not going to
fly very well.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Thu Nov 08, 2018 2:45 am   



On Wed, 07 Nov 2018 14:38:39 -0500, Ingvald44 <noone_at_nowhere.com>
wrote:

Quote:
The 18650 batts are interesting. Some are given ridiculous ratings..

9000 mah is one. They check out at around 1000 mah. Good ones are
actually 3000 mah or so, get the unprotected ones so you can draw
current without it cutting out. I have a 20 volt pack I put together
for a Black and Decker leaf blower. It will now blow off my whole
lawn from one charge. I use a balance charger to keep it happy.


Yep. Here's the discharge curves for two of eBay's cheapest junk
18650 cells, rated at 5800 and 5000 ma-hr, which is science fiction.
Note that I tested at 1.5A so that I don't have to wait forever for
the test to complete:
<http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/battery-tests/18650.jpg>
I would give them 1000 ma-hr and 900 ma-hr respectively. I've seen
worse. I use a West Mountain Radio CBA-II for generating the curves:
<http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/LiPo/Ultrafire%2018650%20test.jpg>
<http://www.westmountainradio.com/cba.php>

I routinely test cells that I pull out of laptop batteries that
measure around 2000 ma-hr. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find where
I buried that data or graphs.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Thu Nov 08, 2018 3:45 am   



On Wed, 07 Nov 2018 19:26:31 -0500, Martin Riddle
<martin_ridd_at_verizon.net> wrote:

Quote:
More later, after I'm done with todays plumbing project.

Why do plumbing projects alway come up in November?


Actually, the timing was fairly good for me. The story on this one is
rather interesting.

I help maintain computers, phones, internet, and plumbing in a small
office building owned by a customer/friend[1]. There are four
bathrooms, each with a very expensive metered faucet on the sink:
<https://www.chicagofaucet.com/RepairDrawings/pdf/RP3501-4E39VPABCP.pdf>
Three years after installation, all four metered faucets failed to
automatically turn off the water. When I tore one apart, I discovered
that there was a Schrader bicycle tire valve screwed into the center
of the "metering valve cartridge" (item #7) that had failed because
the valve spring had rusted away. Since bicycle valves are normally
not used in this manner and normally not immersed in water, I was
worried that the proper spring might be made from stainless steel or
something equally rust resistant. A call to tech support informed me
that the valve was not user replaceable and that the assembly would
cost me only $36 on Amazon. No thanks. I went to my car, dug though
my box of bicycle parts, found a new tire valve, and had it working in
a few minutes. I'll fix the other faucets tomorrow and determine the
spring material over the next week or so.

[1] Customers pay me. Friends do not. Otherwise, they're the same.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

John Doe
Guest

Thu Nov 08, 2018 4:45 am   



Panasonic 18650s have been rated at no less than 3400 mA hours, for
years. I have been using two of them, for at least 2 years. Their
capacity is many times verified to be over 3000 mA hours.

I just noticed this BS post is from the persistent nym-shifting
troll known as "AlwaysWrong". Is it really that stupid/ignorant?

--
DLUNU <DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno DLU.org> wrote:

Quote:
Path: eternal-september.org!reader02.eternal-september.org!feeder.eternal-september.org!aioe.org!.POSTED!not-for-mail
From: DLUNU <DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno DLU.org
Newsgroups: sci.electronics.design
Subject: Re: Using cordless tool batteries to power a drone
Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2018 19:31:48 +0000 (UTC)
Organization: DLU
Lines: 65
Message-ID: <prvej4$fsu$1 gioia.aioe.org
References: <prv73u$g3h$1 dont-email.me> <prvact$87v$1 gioia.aioe.org
NNTP-Posting-Host: 2OGt5QfTQMwQyNuExg78MA.user.gioia.aioe.org
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Xref: reader02.eternal-september.org sci.electronics.design:528348

698839253X6D445TD nospam.org> wrote in
news:prvact$87v$1 gioia.aioe.org:

On a sunny day (Wed, 7 Nov 2018 17:24:14 -0000 (UTC)) it happened John
Doe <always.look message.header> wrote in
prv73u$g3h$1 dont-email.me>:

Disclaimer: I'm not looking for the best drone power supply. I enjoy
using high quality branded products. Of course it's all made in China.
That is IMO a good reason to pay close attention to branding. I intend
to pay VERY close attention to my battery pack temperature, and to
take the endeavor very slowly.

I have a spare Dewalt 20 V Max 6 amp hour battery, and a load of new
18650 batteries from an electric monowheel/unicycle I bought mainly
for the experience.

I would bet the 18650s in Dewalt's 9 amp hour FLEX VOLT would work,
for $200. I suppose trying to find those batteries would be impossible
due to lack of labeling.

I suppose one way to guess at discharge rates is to look at the
application the battery is meant for, the run time of the device. But
of course data is preferable.

Any resource for discharge rates of 18650 batteries?

Thanks.

Interesting, I have been trying just that,
those batteries to power my Hubsan drone.
First; there are many makes of 18650 batteries, with vastly different
specs. I bought 3 of the best I could find locally (expensive) was
sold as 'Sony' but I am sure it is some Chinese copy,
Anyways tried 2 in series and that gave me shorter flight time than 2
cell lipos. Tried 3 in series with an ebay 10A stepdown switching
regulator and the thing was to heavy to fly, or the regulator limited
at the >10A current required. There is a youtube video of someone
doing the same thing. I still have the batteries but am back to lipos,
And 2 lipos in parallel works for up to 30 minutes it seems.

So look up the specs of your battery..

BTW I bought some big power resistors and use a DC ampere clamp-on
meter for battery duration tests, like this:
http://panteltje.com/pub/power_resistors_IMG_6291.JPG
big heatsink, resistors in series or parallel, 100 W each..
http://panteltje.com/pub/big_heatsink_IMG_6292.JPG

Or measure real drone current:
http://panteltje.com/pub/hubsan_h501s_current_test_full_throttle_IMG_
6
290.JPG
Posted some battery results in August 2017 to the hubsan group.





The 18650s are all made by maybee three major battery makers and
Panasonic is the best and was the originally contracted maker. The
units being dubbed any higher than 1200 mA/h are bogus.

If it were true, all cars would be electric by now. And powered by
little 4X original spec 18650s.


John Doe
Guest

Thu Nov 08, 2018 4:45 am   



Jeff Liebermann <jeffl_at_cruzio.com> wrote:

....

Your claim about capacity versus weight does not translate to the real
world. Two 18650 I have are verified to be approximately 2400 and 3200
ma hours. Their weights are 43.4 and 45.9 grams. The capacity of 18650
does not follow their weight.

The interesting thing about cordless tool batteries is their goal...
high-capacity, high discharge rate (especially with Dewalt FLEX), and
less weight.

Apparently there are other factors, like number of recharges.

DLUNU
Guest

Thu Nov 08, 2018 3:45 pm   



John Doe <always.look_at_message.header> wrote in news:ps09hn$i32$1_at_dont-
email.me:

Quote:
Panasonic 18650s have been rated at no less than 3400 mA hours, for
years. I have been using two of them, for at least 2 years. Their
capacity is many times verified to be over 3000 mA hours.

I just noticed this BS post is from the persistent nym-shifting
troll known as "AlwaysWrong". Is it really that stupid/ignorant?


Geez yer an abject idiot. YOU, motherfucker, are the only fucktard in
this group deserving an "it" moniker, you subhuman scum.

My post was to make aware that there are false claims out there.

So my number of 1200 mAh was supposed to be 3000mAh. The point being
made was that there are no 10000 mAh units or others that we always see
being advertised.

Goddamn, motherfucker, get off your high horse little boy.

And no, fuckhead, you won't be powering your high horse with a
cordless drill either!

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