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? US Robotics Sportster 28,800 Fax modem - PSU requirements.

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David Chapman
Guest

Wed Jun 09, 2010 5:37 pm   



I have mislaid the power supply for a US Robotics Sportster 28,800 Fax
Modem (with V34 and V32bis) which I would like to use. This modem
lights up and *appears* to work with a supply of 9 volts DC, drawing
around 200mA, but I'm not yet entirely convinced that it is performing
correctly.

I did some Google searching and haven't managed to find a manual or
any information about the particular unit that I have, but I did see a
similar modem mentioned which requires 9 volt AC to power it. I haven't
yet attempted feeding my modem with AC because I don't want to risk
damaging it..

Can anyone in this NG tell me what the correct voltage should be, and
if it should be AC or DC?
Is there anywhere on the 'net where I might find a User Manual for
this modem? I've searched for one, so far without any success.

Many thanks,

- Dave.

--
David C.Chapman - (dcchapman_at_minda.co.uk)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sheila
Guest

Wed Jun 09, 2010 6:44 pm   



"David Chapman" <dave_at_minda.co.uk> wrote in message
news:FARW7EBZN8DMFwya_at_chassis.demon.co.uk...
Quote:

I have mislaid the power supply for a US Robotics Sportster 28,800 Fax
Modem (with V34 and V32bis) which I would like to use. This modem
lights up and *appears* to work with a supply of 9 volts DC, drawing
around 200mA, but I'm not yet entirely convinced that it is performing
correctly.

I did some Google searching and haven't managed to find a manual or
any information about the particular unit that I have, but I did see a
similar modem mentioned which requires 9 volt AC to power it. I haven't
yet attempted feeding my modem with AC because I don't want to risk
damaging it..

Can anyone in this NG tell me what the correct voltage should be, and
if it should be AC or DC?
Is there anywhere on the 'net where I might find a User Manual for
this modem? I've searched for one, so far without any success.

Many thanks,

- Dave.

--
David C.Chapman - (dcchapman_at_minda.co.uk)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------


Have you tried contacting a support technician
http://www.usr-emea.com/support/s-email-techie-unkg.asp?loc=unkg

Alternatively, search for the 33.6 version manual - which was the same
hardware with a firmware update.

Good Luck, Sheila

Cydrome Leader
Guest

Wed Jun 09, 2010 9:56 pm   



In sci.electronics.equipment David Chapman <dave_at_minda.co.uk> wrote:
Quote:

I have mislaid the power supply for a US Robotics Sportster 28,800 Fax
Modem (with V34 and V32bis) which I would like to use. This modem
lights up and *appears* to work with a supply of 9 volts DC, drawing
around 200mA, but I'm not yet entirely convinced that it is performing
correctly.

I did some Google searching and haven't managed to find a manual or
any information about the particular unit that I have, but I did see a
similar modem mentioned which requires 9 volt AC to power it. I haven't
yet attempted feeding my modem with AC because I don't want to risk
damaging it..

Can anyone in this NG tell me what the correct voltage should be, and
if it should be AC or DC?
Is there anywhere on the 'net where I might find a User Manual for
this modem? I've searched for one, so far without any success.

Many thanks,

- Dave.


I can check when I get home. I have boxes of those things.

David Chapman
Guest

Wed Jun 09, 2010 10:28 pm   



In message <huor40$blv$1_at_reader1.panix.com>, Mike S.
<retsuhcs_at_xinap.moc> writes
Quote:

In article <FARW7EBZN8DMFwya_at_chassis.demon.co.uk>,
David Chapman <dave_at_minda.co.uk> wrote:

I have mislaid the power supply for a US Robotics Sportster 28,800 Fax
Modem (with V34 and V32bis) which I would like to use. This modem
lights up and *appears* to work with a supply of 9 volts DC, drawing
around 200mA, but I'm not yet entirely convinced that it is performing
correctly.

I did some Google searching and haven't managed to find a manual or
any information about the particular unit that I have, but I did see a
similar modem mentioned which requires 9 volt AC to power it. I haven't
yet attempted feeding my modem with AC because I don't want to risk
damaging it..

Can anyone in this NG tell me what the correct voltage should be, and
if it should be AC or DC?
Is there anywhere on the 'net where I might find a User Manual for
this modem? I've searched for one, so far without any success.

Many thanks,

- Dave.

--
David C.Chapman - (dcchapman_at_minda.co.uk)

Only data I have is for US models, but perhaps you'll find something of
use here. Since there have been 18.3 gazillion different "sportster"
models, it would help if you posted the exact part number.


Very many thanks for all of the contributions made in response to my
posting.

I have just sent a query to the support technicians at US Robotics and
am awaiting a reply.

I'm not sure of the exact model number - printed on the actual case
is a number which is similar, but different, to the list of models shown
above - it reads 1.020.139-B. There is also a white adhesive label on
the underside which says: CJE-0268 followed by the long number
0108390014294363,

From the above information it appears that the unit does require an AC
supply, but I'll wait a day or so to see if US Robotics reply before I
try experimenting with the supply voltage.

Thanks again - Dave

--
David C.Chapman - (dcchapman_at_minda.co.uk)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mike S.
Guest

Wed Jun 09, 2010 10:47 pm   



In article <FARW7EBZN8DMFwya_at_chassis.demon.co.uk>,
David Chapman <dave_at_minda.co.uk> wrote:
Quote:

I have mislaid the power supply for a US Robotics Sportster 28,800 Fax
Modem (with V34 and V32bis) which I would like to use. This modem
lights up and *appears* to work with a supply of 9 volts DC, drawing
around 200mA, but I'm not yet entirely convinced that it is performing
correctly.

I did some Google searching and haven't managed to find a manual or
any information about the particular unit that I have, but I did see a
similar modem mentioned which requires 9 volt AC to power it. I haven't
yet attempted feeding my modem with AC because I don't want to risk
damaging it..

Can anyone in this NG tell me what the correct voltage should be, and
if it should be AC or DC?
Is there anywhere on the 'net where I might find a User Manual for
this modem? I've searched for one, so far without any success.

Many thanks,

- Dave.

--
David C.Chapman - (dcchapman_at_minda.co.uk)

Only data I have is for US models, but perhaps you'll find something of
use here. Since there have been 18.3 gazillion different "sportster"
models, it would help if you posted the exact part number.



USR Part Number: Voltage: Model Number(s)

1.015.090-B: (Input 120VAC, 60Hz) (Output: 9.2 vac_at_533mA):
00021800 00021900 00026100 00026400
00026500 00026501 00026502 00026600
00026601 00026700 00026701 00026702
00026800 00026801 00026802 00026805
00026806 00026900 00026901 00026902
00026905 00027800 00092200

1.015.1202-B: (Input 120VAC, 60Hz) (Output: 20vac @750mA):
00027900 00074500 00074600 00074700
00074800 00083900 00083901 00083902
00084100 00114100 00117200 00126500
00126501 00126502

1.015.1286: (Input 120VAC, 60Hz, 16Watts) (Output 9VAC, 1000mA):
00083903 00083905 00083907 00083908
00083909 00084000 00084001 00084002
00084003 00084004 00084005 00126502
00126504 00126505 00178400 00178600
00178602 00178900 00178902 00564100
00568400 00568600 00568602 00568603
00568900 00568902 00568903

1.015.1443-00: (Input: 120v AC, 60 Hz, 21 watts) (Output: 9 volts AC, 1500
mA):
00560500

Steve Terry
Guest

Wed Jun 09, 2010 11:12 pm   



"David Chapman" <dave_at_minda.co.uk> wrote in message
news:FARW7EBZN8DMFwya_at_chassis.demon.co.uk...
Quote:

I have mislaid the power supply for a US Robotics Sportster 28,800 Fax
Modem (with V34 and V32bis) which I would like to use. This modem
lights up and *appears* to work with a supply of 9 volts DC, drawing
around 200mA, but I'm not yet entirely convinced that it is performing
correctly.

I did some Google searching and haven't managed to find a manual or
any information about the particular unit that I have, but I did see a
similar modem mentioned which requires 9 volt AC to power it. I haven't
yet attempted feeding my modem with AC because I don't want to risk
damaging it..


If it is fed with AC it'll be to a rectifier and regulator circuit turning

it
into DC, so be on the safe side and feed it with DC anyway.

Run it on 12v DC, it's likely the regulators will be able to dissipate it
if it is excessive voltage.

Steve Terry
--
Welcome Sign-up Bonus of 1 when you signup free at:
http://www.topcashback.co.uk/ref/G4WWK

tm
Guest

Thu Jun 10, 2010 3:49 am   



"Steve Terry" <gfourwwk_at_tesco.net> wrote in message
news:hup3kc$mau$1_at_news.eternal-september.org...
Quote:
"David Chapman" <dave_at_minda.co.uk> wrote in message
news:FARW7EBZN8DMFwya_at_chassis.demon.co.uk...

I have mislaid the power supply for a US Robotics Sportster 28,800 Fax
Modem (with V34 and V32bis) which I would like to use. This modem
lights up and *appears* to work with a supply of 9 volts DC, drawing
around 200mA, but I'm not yet entirely convinced that it is performing
correctly.

I did some Google searching and haven't managed to find a manual or
any information about the particular unit that I have, but I did see a
similar modem mentioned which requires 9 volt AC to power it. I haven't
yet attempted feeding my modem with AC because I don't want to risk
damaging it..


If it is fed with AC it'll be to a rectifier and regulator circuit turning
it
into DC, so be on the safe side and feed it with DC anyway.

Run it on 12v DC, it's likely the regulators will be able to dissipate it
if it is excessive voltage.

If it needs AC, then it is most likely generating plus and minus dc voltages

inside. Since it is a modem, and has rs232, it would need + and - voltages.

If you feed it dc only, you will only have one of the supplies in the unit.


Try a 9 volt ac wart.

Woody
Guest

Thu Jun 10, 2010 7:23 am   



"tm" <noone_at_msc.com> wrote in message
news:hupjn3$eo5$1_at_speranza.aioe.org...
Quote:

"Steve Terry" <gfourwwk_at_tesco.net> wrote in message
news:hup3kc$mau$1_at_news.eternal-september.org...
"David Chapman" <dave_at_minda.co.uk> wrote in message
news:FARW7EBZN8DMFwya_at_chassis.demon.co.uk...

I have mislaid the power supply for a US Robotics Sportster
28,800 Fax
Modem (with V34 and V32bis) which I would like to use. This
modem
lights up and *appears* to work with a supply of 9 volts DC,
drawing
around 200mA, but I'm not yet entirely convinced that it is
performing
correctly.

I did some Google searching and haven't managed to find a
manual or
any information about the particular unit that I have, but I
did see a
similar modem mentioned which requires 9 volt AC to power it.
I haven't
yet attempted feeding my modem with AC because I don't want
to risk
damaging it..


If it is fed with AC it'll be to a rectifier and regulator
circuit turning it
into DC, so be on the safe side and feed it with DC anyway.

Run it on 12v DC, it's likely the regulators will be able to
dissipate it
if it is excessive voltage.

If it needs AC, then it is most likely generating plus and
minus dc voltages
inside. Since it is a modem, and has rs232, it would need +
and - voltages.

If you feed it dc only, you will only have one of the supplies
in the unit.


Try a 9 volt ac wart.












We (still) use the USR Message Modem and that needs 18Vac. My
Googling indicates 9Vac 400mA


--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com

ian field
Guest

Thu Jun 10, 2010 5:34 pm   



"Woody" <harrogate3_at_ntlworld.spam.com> wrote in message
news:Bx%Pn.2$Cw6.0_at_hurricane...
Quote:
"tm" <noone_at_msc.com> wrote in message
news:hupjn3$eo5$1_at_speranza.aioe.org...

"Steve Terry" <gfourwwk_at_tesco.net> wrote in message
news:hup3kc$mau$1_at_news.eternal-september.org...
"David Chapman" <dave_at_minda.co.uk> wrote in message
news:FARW7EBZN8DMFwya_at_chassis.demon.co.uk...

I have mislaid the power supply for a US Robotics Sportster 28,800 Fax
Modem (with V34 and V32bis) which I would like to use. This modem
lights up and *appears* to work with a supply of 9 volts DC, drawing
around 200mA, but I'm not yet entirely convinced that it is performing
correctly.

I did some Google searching and haven't managed to find a manual or
any information about the particular unit that I have, but I did see a
similar modem mentioned which requires 9 volt AC to power it. I haven't
yet attempted feeding my modem with AC because I don't want to risk
damaging it..


If it is fed with AC it'll be to a rectifier and regulator circuit
turning it
into DC, so be on the safe side and feed it with DC anyway.

Run it on 12v DC, it's likely the regulators will be able to dissipate
it
if it is excessive voltage.

If it needs AC, then it is most likely generating plus and minus dc
voltages
inside. Since it is a modem, and has rs232, it would need + and -
voltages.

If you feed it dc only, you will only have one of the supplies in the
unit.


Try a 9 volt ac wart.












We (still) use the USR Message Modem and that needs 18Vac. My Googling
indicates 9Vac 400mA


IIRC the most common type is 13VAC.

Bear in mind that if it connects to the PC via RS232, it must be capable of
generating plus and minus 12v rails.

Woody
Guest

Thu Jun 10, 2010 7:30 pm   



"ian field" <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:Xu8Qn.730$nz1.533_at_hurricane...
Quote:

"Woody" <harrogate3_at_ntlworld.spam.com> wrote in message
news:Bx%Pn.2$Cw6.0_at_hurricane...
"tm" <noone_at_msc.com> wrote in message
news:hupjn3$eo5$1_at_speranza.aioe.org...

"Steve Terry" <gfourwwk_at_tesco.net> wrote in message
news:hup3kc$mau$1_at_news.eternal-september.org...
"David Chapman" <dave_at_minda.co.uk> wrote in message
news:FARW7EBZN8DMFwya_at_chassis.demon.co.uk...

I have mislaid the power supply for a US Robotics
Sportster 28,800 Fax
Modem (with V34 and V32bis) which I would like to use.
This modem
lights up and *appears* to work with a supply of 9 volts
DC, drawing
around 200mA, but I'm not yet entirely convinced that it is
performing
correctly.

I did some Google searching and haven't managed to find a
manual or
any information about the particular unit that I have, but
I did see a
similar modem mentioned which requires 9 volt AC to power
it. I haven't
yet attempted feeding my modem with AC because I don't want
to risk
damaging it..


If it is fed with AC it'll be to a rectifier and regulator
circuit turning it
into DC, so be on the safe side and feed it with DC anyway.

Run it on 12v DC, it's likely the regulators will be able to
dissipate it
if it is excessive voltage.

If it needs AC, then it is most likely generating plus and
minus dc voltages
inside. Since it is a modem, and has rs232, it would need +
and - voltages.

If you feed it dc only, you will only have one of the
supplies in the unit.


Try a 9 volt ac wart.












We (still) use the USR Message Modem and that needs 18Vac. My
Googling indicates 9Vac 400mA


IIRC the most common type is 13VAC.

Bear in mind that if it connects to the PC via RS232, it must
be capable of generating plus and minus 12v rails.




Well yes and no. IMSMC RS232 can start at anything up to +/- 15V
but is more usually 12. The important bit is what it is doing
when it gets to the other end - ISTR +/-5V absolute minimum,
usually 6.

And with electronics from anywhere in the last 30 years or so
higher voltages can easily be generated by cap/diode pumps or
more specialist chips. It's just that using ac as the source
means that they don't need to have an oscillator on board.


--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com

Theo Markettos
Guest

Thu Jun 10, 2010 7:46 pm   



In uk.telecom Woody <harrogate3_at_ntlworld.spam.com> wrote:
Quote:
We (still) use the USR Message Modem and that needs 18Vac. My
Googling indicates 9Vac 400mA

9V AC sounds about right for the Sportster 14400 (very similar). It's
definitely an AC supply and I'm fairly sure it's 9V. I think it may be a
bit more than 400mA, BICBW.

Theo

Dennis Ferguson
Guest

Thu Jun 10, 2010 8:18 pm   



On 2010-06-10, Woody <harrogate3_at_ntlworld.spam.com> wrote:
Quote:
"ian field" <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:Xu8Qn.730$nz1.533_at_hurricane...

"Woody" <harrogate3_at_ntlworld.spam.com> wrote in message
news:Bx%Pn.2$Cw6.0_at_hurricane...
"tm" <noone_at_msc.com> wrote in message
news:hupjn3$eo5$1_at_speranza.aioe.org...

"Steve Terry" <gfourwwk_at_tesco.net> wrote in message
news:hup3kc$mau$1_at_news.eternal-september.org...
"David Chapman" <dave_at_minda.co.uk> wrote in message
news:FARW7EBZN8DMFwya_at_chassis.demon.co.uk...

I have mislaid the power supply for a US Robotics
Sportster 28,800 Fax
Modem (with V34 and V32bis) which I would like to use.
This modem
lights up and *appears* to work with a supply of 9 volts
DC, drawing
around 200mA, but I'm not yet entirely convinced that it is
performing
correctly.

I did some Google searching and haven't managed to find a
manual or
any information about the particular unit that I have, but
I did see a
similar modem mentioned which requires 9 volt AC to power
it. I haven't
yet attempted feeding my modem with AC because I don't want
to risk
damaging it..


If it is fed with AC it'll be to a rectifier and regulator
circuit turning it
into DC, so be on the safe side and feed it with DC anyway.

Run it on 12v DC, it's likely the regulators will be able to
dissipate it
if it is excessive voltage.

If it needs AC, then it is most likely generating plus and
minus dc voltages
inside. Since it is a modem, and has rs232, it would need +
and - voltages.

If you feed it dc only, you will only have one of the
supplies in the unit.


Try a 9 volt ac wart.


We (still) use the USR Message Modem and that needs 18Vac. My
Googling indicates 9Vac 400mA


IIRC the most common type is 13VAC.

Bear in mind that if it connects to the PC via RS232, it must
be capable of generating plus and minus 12v rails.

A 9V AC power supply is sufficient to generate that without
resorting to switching; the peak voltages from the supply are
+/- 12.7 volts. A power supply which depends on that
is unlikely to function well with a 9V DC wall wart, though.

Quote:
Well yes and no. IMSMC RS232 can start at anything up to +/- 15V
but is more usually 12. The important bit is what it is doing
when it gets to the other end - ISTR +/-5V absolute minimum,
usually 6.

I don't know, but in real life I've connected a standard RS232
interface to a board header which provided only TTL levels
(i.e. 0 and 5V) and had it function. I did this from desperation,
though, and wouldn't recommend it.

Dennis Ferguson

Bob Eager
Guest

Thu Jun 10, 2010 8:42 pm   



On Thu, 10 Jun 2010 17:34:56 +0100, ian field wrote:

Quote:
IIRC the most common type is 13VAC.

Bear in mind that if it connects to the PC via RS232, it must be capable
of generating plus and minus 12v rails.

I built a board here that runs off 5V. A MAX232 driver/charge pump drives
the serial line fine.




--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org

*lightning protection* - a w_tom conductor

ian field
Guest

Thu Jun 10, 2010 9:34 pm   



"Bob Eager" <rde42_at_spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:87cthdFpmfU1_at_mid.individual.net...
Quote:
On Thu, 10 Jun 2010 17:34:56 +0100, ian field wrote:

IIRC the most common type is 13VAC.

Bear in mind that if it connects to the PC via RS232, it must be capable
of generating plus and minus 12v rails.

I built a board here that runs off 5V. A MAX232 driver/charge pump drives
the serial line fine.


Its the darndest thing tho', I've never yet seen a MAX232 in any of the
modems I've had apart.

Bob Eager
Guest

Thu Jun 10, 2010 9:45 pm   



On Thu, 10 Jun 2010 21:34:14 +0100, ian field wrote:

Quote:
"Bob Eager" <rde42_at_spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:87cthdFpmfU1_at_mid.individual.net...
On Thu, 10 Jun 2010 17:34:56 +0100, ian field wrote:

IIRC the most common type is 13VAC.

Bear in mind that if it connects to the PC via RS232, it must be
capable of generating plus and minus 12v rails.

I built a board here that runs off 5V. A MAX232 driver/charge pump
drives the serial line fine.


Its the darndest thing tho', I've never yet seen a MAX232 in any of the
modems I've had apart.

Should have made it clear, mine wasn't a modem...it was a clone of a
PDP-8....!



--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org

*lightning protection* - a w_tom conductor

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