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Jeroen Belleman
Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 5:45 pm   



Do we have a handy term to say that two sinusoidal waves
of equal frequency differ only by amplitude and phase?
I would say 'correlated', but would that be the most
common term?

Jeroen Belleman

John Larkin
Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 5:45 pm   



On Wed, 06 Feb 2019 17:08:56 +0100, Jeroen Belleman
<jeroen_at_nospam.please> wrote:

Quote:
Do we have a handy term to say that two sinusoidal waves
of equal frequency differ only by amplitude and phase?
I would say 'correlated', but would that be the most
common term?

Jeroen Belleman


Synchronous?


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics


Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 5:45 pm   



On Wednesday, 6 February 2019 16:09:01 UTC, Jeroen Belleman wrote:

Quote:
Do we have a handy term to say that two sinusoidal waves
of equal frequency differ only by amplitude and phase?
I would say 'correlated', but would that be the most
common term?

Jeroen Belleman


I used to know the terms for this sort of thing, but can't remember. There are isochronous & isochronal.


NT

George Herold
Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 5:45 pm   



On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 11:09:01 AM UTC-5, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
Quote:
Do we have a handy term to say that two sinusoidal waves
of equal frequency differ only by amplitude and phase?
I would say 'correlated', but would that be the most
common term?

Jeroen Belleman


Same frequency, different amplitude and phase, is the best I can do :^)

George H.


Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 5:45 pm   



I am not a super expert on this but I think you just described it the way it is described. I know of no specific word for it. I like to think my vocabulary is pretty good but I could be wrong.

You might try putting your description into a search engine and see what it says about it.


Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:45 pm   



On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 11:09:01 AM UTC-5, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
Quote:
Do we have a handy term to say that two sinusoidal waves
of equal frequency differ only by amplitude and phase?
I would say 'correlated', but would that be the most
common term?

Jeroen Belleman


Those types of signals are called coherent. It is a very broad area of study, but, when you say coherent sine waves, the people who know the field will understand it to mean exactly what you describe.

Winfield Hill
Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:45 pm   



Jeroen Belleman wrote...
Quote:

Do we have a handy term to say that two sinusoidal waves
of equal frequency differ only by amplitude and phase?
I would say 'correlated', but would that be the most
common term?


How about locked in frequency (doesn't say anything
about amplitude and phase).


--
Thanks,
- Win

piglet
Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 7:45 pm   



On 06/02/2019 4:28 pm, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Wed, 06 Feb 2019 17:08:56 +0100, Jeroen Belleman
jeroen_at_nospam.please> wrote:

Do we have a handy term to say that two sinusoidal waves
of equal frequency differ only by amplitude and phase?
I would say 'correlated', but would that be the most
common term?

Jeroen Belleman

Synchronous?



+42

Best suggestion yet

piglet


Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 7:45 pm   



Correlated is not correct. A since wave and cosine wave are totally uncorrelated.


Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 7:45 pm   



Jeroen Belleman <jeroen_at_nospam.please> wrote in news:q3f0qm$sqr$1
@gioia.aioe.org:

Quote:
Do we have a handy term to say that two sinusoidal waves
of equal frequency differ only by amplitude and phase?
I would say 'correlated', but would that be the most
common term?

Jeroen Belleman


Phase locked?

John Larkin
Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:45 pm   



On Wed, 6 Feb 2019 10:16:08 -0800 (PST), bulegoge_at_columbus.rr.com
wrote:

>Correlated is not correct. A since wave and cosine wave are totally uncorrelated.

So the cross-correlation function is everywhere zero?


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com

Clive Arthur
Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:45 pm   



On 06/02/2019 16:08, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
Quote:
Do we have a handy term to say that two sinusoidal waves
of equal frequency differ only by amplitude and phase?
I would say 'correlated', but would that be the most
common term?

Jeroen Belleman


In tune.

Cheers
--
Clive


Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:45 pm   



You could say two sinusoidal waves constructed from the same sin/cos basis pair.


Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:45 pm   



On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 2:50:28 PM UTC-5, Phil Allison wrote:
Quote:
Jeroen Belleman wrote:

Do we have a handy term to say that two sinusoidal waves
of equal frequency differ only by amplitude and phase?
I would say 'correlated', but would that be the most
common term?



** Such a term would be ambiguous and hence useless.

Two sine waves will differ only in phase and amplitude if one is *derived* from the other - eg the input and output of a filter or amplifier.

Or, although coming from independent sources, one is phase locked to the other with some fixed phase difference.

You do come up with some whacky absurdities.

Having a nice troll ??


Ummm- could be any echo or a comparison to be made from some other channel transmission as with a lock-in amplifier.

Quote:



... Phil





1.


Don Kuenz
Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:45 pm   



bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 11:09:01 AM UTC-5, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
Do we have a handy term to say that two sinusoidal waves
of equal frequency differ only by amplitude and phase?
I would say 'correlated', but would that be the most
common term?

Jeroen Belleman

Those types of signals are called coherent. It is a very broad area of
study, but, when you say coherent sine waves, the people who know the
field will understand it to mean exactly what you describe.


Yes indeed. My _IEEE Dictionary_ says it this way:

coherent (1) (fiber optics). Characterized by a fixed phase relationship
between points on an electromagnetic wave. Note: A truly monochromatic
wave would be perfectly coherent at all points in space. In practice,
however, the region of high coherence may extend only a finite distance.

Thank you, 73,

--
Don Kuenz KB7RPU
There was a young lady named Bright Whose speed was far faster than light;
She set out one day In a relative way And returned on the previous night.

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