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Space Elevator Not Gonna Happen

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Guest

Thu Jan 31, 2019 9:45 pm   



Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg


Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 12:45 am   



On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 7:39:18 AM UTC+11, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg


Didn't watch the youtube presentation - life's too short - but any practical space elevator is going to depend on long carbon nanotubes. Nothing else we know of has the tensile strength, and they don't seem to be commercially available yet.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

John S
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 1:45 am   



On 1/31/2019 2:39 PM, bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg


No one ever puts pencil to paper on these stupid ideas. Disgusting!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyTjdkNEgV0


Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 2:45 am   



On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 7:14:59 PM UTC-5, John S wrote:
Quote:
On 1/31/2019 2:39 PM, bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg


No one ever puts pencil to paper on these stupid ideas. Disgusting!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyTjdkNEgV0


I believe the profession calls the kind of people who dream up that kind of nonsense, archistars.


Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 2:45 am   



On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 6:35:08 PM UTC-5, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
Quote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 7:39:18 AM UTC+11, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg

Didn't watch the youtube presentation - life's too short - but any practical space elevator is going to depend on long carbon nanotubes. Nothing else we know of has the tensile strength, and they don't seem to be commercially available yet.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney


The channel belongs to Grady Hillhouse, a CE PE, and he explains very simply how no other material could possibly work. Talk about hanging by a thread! I wouldn't trust it.

George Herold
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 2:45 am   



On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:14:48 PM UTC-5, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 6:35:08 PM UTC-5, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 7:39:18 AM UTC+11, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg

Didn't watch the youtube presentation - life's too short - but any practical space elevator is going to depend on long carbon nanotubes. Nothing else we know of has the tensile strength, and they don't seem to be commercially available yet.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

The channel belongs to Grady Hillhouse, a CE PE, and he explains very simply how no other material could possibly work. Talk about hanging by a thread! I wouldn't trust it.


I didn't watch either, but space elevators are monstrously fun ideas.

George H.


Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 3:45 am   



On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 12:16:08 PM UTC+11, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 7:14:59 PM UTC-5, John S wrote:
On 1/31/2019 2:39 PM, bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg

No one ever puts pencil to paper on these stupid ideas. Disgusting!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyTjdkNEgV0

I believe the profession calls the kind of people who dream up that kind of nonsense, archistars.


Until someone put them into practice, when they become prophets.

Willy Ley's book, "Engineers' Dreams: Great projects that could come true", published by Viking Press in 1959, had a bunch of these projects.

Curiously, Google and Wikipedia don't seem to know about it, but Google does list a bunch of copies of the book which one could buy.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 3:45 am   



On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:33:41 PM UTC-5, George Herold wrote:
Quote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:14:48 PM UTC-5, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 6:35:08 PM UTC-5, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 7:39:18 AM UTC+11, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg

Didn't watch the youtube presentation - life's too short - but any practical space elevator is going to depend on long carbon nanotubes. Nothing else we know of has the tensile strength, and they don't seem to be commercially available yet.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

The channel belongs to Grady Hillhouse, a CE PE, and he explains very simply how no other material could possibly work. Talk about hanging by a thread! I wouldn't trust it.

I didn't watch either, but space elevators are monstrously fun ideas.

George H.


People like to knock the idea because it isn't currently practical. But how many things were conceived before they were practical only to become commonplace after an enabling technology was invented?

The list includes the video phone, RADAR, earbuds, the electronic tablet, the Internet, credit cards and even the moon landings if you recall Jules Verne.

Excuse me while I hail a Johnny Cab!


Rick C.

- Get 6 months of free supercharging
- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209


Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 4:45 am   



gnuarm.deletethisbit_at_gmail.com wrote in
news:23f9348e-a0d9-47dc-8653-5dff9846c800_at_googlegroups.com:

Quote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:33:41 PM UTC-5, George Herold
wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:14:48 PM UTC-5,
bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 6:35:08 PM UTC-5,
bill....@ieee.org wrote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 7:39:18 AM UTC+11,
bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg

Didn't watch the youtube presentation - life's too short -
but any practical space elevator is going to depend on long
carbon nanotubes. Nothing else we know of has the tensile
strength, and they don't seem to be commercially available
yet.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

The channel belongs to Grady Hillhouse, a CE PE, and he
explains very simply how no other material could possibly work.
Talk about hanging by a thread! I wouldn't trust it.

I didn't watch either, but space elevators are monstrously fun
ideas.

George H.

People like to knock the idea because it isn't currently
practical. But how many things were conceived before they were
practical only to become commonplace after an enabling technology
was invented?

The list includes the video phone, RADAR, earbuds, the electronic
tablet, the Internet, credit cards and even the moon landings if
you recall Jules Verne.

Excuse me while I hail a Johnny Cab!


Rick C.

- Get 6 months of free supercharging
- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209


If we make one, it will be a simple, small payload (maybe 100kg)
dumbwaiter on a string (carbon fiber strand) for continuous task
events wher the end result is delivery of a large amount of
materials. It will simply require that it get parsed up into small
parcels. So nothing big. We can still fire rockets for that stuff.

What we should do is perfect the in orbit logistics so that
'package handlers' can gather the dumbwaiter parcels and group them
up for delivery to the ISS or such.

Mike
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 5:45 am   



On 1/31/2019 6:05 PM, gnuarm.deletethisbit_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:33:41 PM UTC-5, George Herold wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:14:48 PM UTC-5, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 6:35:08 PM UTC-5, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 7:39:18 AM UTC+11, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg

Didn't watch the youtube presentation - life's too short - but any practical space elevator is going to depend on long carbon nanotubes. Nothing else we know of has the tensile strength, and they don't seem to be commercially available yet.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

The channel belongs to Grady Hillhouse, a CE PE, and he explains very simply how no other material could possibly work. Talk about hanging by a thread! I wouldn't trust it.

I didn't watch either, but space elevators are monstrously fun ideas.

George H.

People like to knock the idea because it isn't currently practical. But how many things were conceived before they were practical only to become commonplace after an enabling technology was invented?

The list includes the video phone, RADAR, earbuds, the electronic tablet, the Internet, credit cards and even the moon landings if you recall Jules Verne.

Excuse me while I hail a Johnny Cab!


Rick C.

You're confusing engineering feasibility and survivability in the real
world.
The technology of the lift mechanism is irrelevant.
You don't have to do ANY analysis to determine that it will never work.
Strong wind
Airplane
terrorist
engineering stupidity
earthquake

Even if you could build it, there are too many evil people for it to
survive. We can't even protect twin towers close to earth in protected
airspace

Take your credit card example.
People use them because the vendor guarantees they won't lose personally
for any of the many ways things can go wrong. There are MANY cards.
Like insurance, the small fees charged cover the small percentage of
failures
and the world goes on.

When you have ONE thing that's hugely expensive and impossible to
protect from harm, intentional or otherwise, the "insurance" model
doesn't hold up.

Space elevator is a technologist's wet dream.


Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 6:45 am   



On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 11:05:00 PM UTC-5, Mike wrote:
Quote:
On 1/31/2019 6:05 PM, gnuarm.deletethisbit_at_gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:33:41 PM UTC-5, George Herold wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:14:48 PM UTC-5, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 6:35:08 PM UTC-5, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 7:39:18 AM UTC+11, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg

Didn't watch the youtube presentation - life's too short - but any practical space elevator is going to depend on long carbon nanotubes. Nothing else we know of has the tensile strength, and they don't seem to be commercially available yet.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

The channel belongs to Grady Hillhouse, a CE PE, and he explains very simply how no other material could possibly work. Talk about hanging by a thread! I wouldn't trust it.

I didn't watch either, but space elevators are monstrously fun ideas.

George H.

People like to knock the idea because it isn't currently practical. But how many things were conceived before they were practical only to become commonplace after an enabling technology was invented?

The list includes the video phone, RADAR, earbuds, the electronic tablet, the Internet, credit cards and even the moon landings if you recall Jules Verne.

Excuse me while I hail a Johnny Cab!


Rick C.

You're confusing engineering feasibility and survivability in the real
world.
The technology of the lift mechanism is irrelevant.
You don't have to do ANY analysis to determine that it will never work.
Strong wind
Airplane
terrorist
engineering stupidity
earthquake

Even if you could build it, there are too many evil people for it to
survive. We can't even protect twin towers close to earth in protected
airspace

Take your credit card example.
People use them because the vendor guarantees they won't lose personally
for any of the many ways things can go wrong. There are MANY cards.
Like insurance, the small fees charged cover the small percentage of
failures
and the world goes on.

When you have ONE thing that's hugely expensive and impossible to
protect from harm, intentional or otherwise, the "insurance" model
doesn't hold up.

Space elevator is a technologist's wet dream.


Yes, many things are not well thought out. You analysis is one of them. The twin towers is one of many potential targets, so yes, they were hard to protect from attack by air which we had failed to consider adequately. But the analogy is not very good. The space elevator won't be located in New York or Washington or any other major city. It will be located in a relatively remote area where it can be easily cordoned off not allowing ships or airplanes to come anywhere near.

I think the lower 7 miles of the space elevator will be relatively easy to protect. It's the upper 22,000 miles that won't be so easy. Fortunately the likelihood of anything impacting it is relatively small... unless another country with space capability decides to attack it. But then we have nothing to protect any of our satellites in space either.

BTW, you can get insurance for singular events as well as large pools.


Rick C.

+ Get 6 months of free supercharging
+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

David Brown
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 9:45 am   



On 01/02/2019 03:05, gnuarm.deletethisbit_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:33:41 PM UTC-5, George Herold
wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:14:48 PM UTC-5,
bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 6:35:08 PM UTC-5,
bill....@ieee.org wrote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 7:39:18 AM UTC+11,
bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg

Didn't watch the youtube presentation - life's too short - but
any practical space elevator is going to depend on long carbon
nanotubes. Nothing else we know of has the tensile strength,
and they don't seem to be commercially available yet.

-- Bill Sloman, Sydney

The channel belongs to Grady Hillhouse, a CE PE, and he explains
very simply how no other material could possibly work. Talk about
hanging by a thread! I wouldn't trust it.

I didn't watch either, but space elevators are monstrously fun
ideas.

George H.

People like to knock the idea because it isn't currently practical.
But how many things were conceived before they were practical only to
become commonplace after an enabling technology was invented?


This is one case where the basic concept is understood, but we are still
missing the required materials. Long, cheap carbon nanotubes - or
anything else with similar properties - would be very useful for lots of
purposes. So there is plenty of research going on in trying to make
them. We don't need to done anything about space elevators for now - we
just need to keep them in mind for the day that such materials become
available.

David Brown
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 9:45 am   



On 01/02/2019 04:01, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org wrote:
Quote:
gnuarm.deletethisbit_at_gmail.com wrote in
news:23f9348e-a0d9-47dc-8653-5dff9846c800_at_googlegroups.com:

On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:33:41 PM UTC-5, George Herold
wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:14:48 PM UTC-5,
bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 6:35:08 PM UTC-5,
bill....@ieee.org wrote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 7:39:18 AM UTC+11,
bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg

Didn't watch the youtube presentation - life's too short -
but any practical space elevator is going to depend on long
carbon nanotubes. Nothing else we know of has the tensile
strength, and they don't seem to be commercially available
yet.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

The channel belongs to Grady Hillhouse, a CE PE, and he
explains very simply how no other material could possibly work.
Talk about hanging by a thread! I wouldn't trust it.

I didn't watch either, but space elevators are monstrously fun
ideas.

George H.

People like to knock the idea because it isn't currently
practical. But how many things were conceived before they were
practical only to become commonplace after an enabling technology
was invented?

The list includes the video phone, RADAR, earbuds, the electronic
tablet, the Internet, credit cards and even the moon landings if
you recall Jules Verne.

Excuse me while I hail a Johnny Cab!


Rick C.

- Get 6 months of free supercharging
- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209


If we make one, it will be a simple, small payload (maybe 100kg)
dumbwaiter on a string (carbon fiber strand) for continuous task
events wher the end result is delivery of a large amount of
materials. It will simply require that it get parsed up into small
parcels. So nothing big. We can still fire rockets for that stuff.

What we should do is perfect the in orbit logistics so that
'package handlers' can gather the dumbwaiter parcels and group them
up for delivery to the ISS or such.


On thing that I believe many people forget about space elevators is the
challenge of the lengths. It needs to be 36,000 km long (ignoring any
curves). At standard high-speed elevator speeds of 10 m/s, that is 40
days of travel time. Who wants to listen to elevator music for 6 weeks?

Even though I'm sure speeds would be higher, and much of it would be
getting off at earlier stops like low earth orbit, it's still more of a
freight solution than a people solution.

Still, there is a lot of freight that one could want to transport up
there, if there were a cheap method.

Tom Gardner
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 9:45 am   



On 01/02/19 08:12, David Brown wrote:
Quote:
On 01/02/2019 03:05, gnuarm.deletethisbit_at_gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:33:41 PM UTC-5, George Herold
wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:14:48 PM UTC-5,
bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 6:35:08 PM UTC-5,
bill....@ieee.org wrote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 7:39:18 AM UTC+11,
bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg

Didn't watch the youtube presentation - life's too short - but
any practical space elevator is going to depend on long carbon
nanotubes. Nothing else we know of has the tensile strength,
and they don't seem to be commercially available yet.

-- Bill Sloman, Sydney

The channel belongs to Grady Hillhouse, a CE PE, and he explains
very simply how no other material could possibly work. Talk about
hanging by a thread! I wouldn't trust it.

I didn't watch either, but space elevators are monstrously fun
ideas.

George H.

People like to knock the idea because it isn't currently practical.
But how many things were conceived before they were practical only to
become commonplace after an enabling technology was invented?


This is one case where the basic concept is understood, but we are still
missing the required materials. Long, cheap carbon nanotubes - or
anything else with similar properties - would be very useful for lots of
purposes. So there is plenty of research going on in trying to make
them. We don't need to done anything about space elevators for now - we
just need to keep them in mind for the day that such materials become
available.


Has it been demonstrated that their properties
would be sufficient?

David Brown
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 11:45 am   



On 01/02/2019 09:38, Tom Gardner wrote:
Quote:
On 01/02/19 08:12, David Brown wrote:
On 01/02/2019 03:05, gnuarm.deletethisbit_at_gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:33:41 PM UTC-5, George Herold
wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:14:48 PM UTC-5,
bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 6:35:08 PM UTC-5,
bill....@ieee.org wrote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 7:39:18 AM UTC+11,
bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
Another ripoff in the making.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAXGUQ_ewcg

Didn't watch the youtube presentation - life's too short - but
any practical space elevator is going to depend on long carbon
nanotubes. Nothing else we know of has the tensile strength,
and they don't seem to be commercially available yet.

-- Bill Sloman, Sydney

The channel belongs to Grady Hillhouse, a CE PE, and he explains
very simply how no other material could possibly work. Talk about
hanging by a thread! I wouldn't trust it.

I didn't watch either, but space elevators are monstrously fun
ideas.

George H.

People like to knock the idea because it isn't currently practical.
But how many things were conceived before they were practical only to
become commonplace after an enabling technology was invented?


This is one case where the basic concept is understood, but we are still
missing the required materials.  Long, cheap carbon nanotubes - or
anything else with similar properties - would be very useful for lots of
purposes.  So there is plenty of research going on in trying to make
them.  We don't need to done anything about space elevators for now - we
just need to keep them in mind for the day that such materials become
available.

Has it been demonstrated that their properties
would be sufficient?


I don't think so - only estimated, but I believe it looks good. There
have been a few short cables made, typically held up by balloons. And
there are lots of challenges of design and engineering to make it all
work once the basic materials are available.

Of course, there are all sorts of non-technical challenges too - like
the economics of it, even if cheap and long nanotubes are developed.

Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next

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