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removing heat with thermal tape and small heatsinks

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John Larkin
Guest

Tue Feb 05, 2019 5:45 am   



On Mon, 4 Feb 2019 22:58:46 +0000 (UTC),
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org wrote:

Quote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
news:pmef5ep7i43lkn4lt0qfqic2h9cel11ori_at_4ax.com:

Sorry, I use numbers when I do engineering.



Funny, you have yet to show any numbers that have anything to do with
this application.


Read my posts.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics

George Herold
Guest

Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:45 pm   



On Monday, February 4, 2019 at 10:27:16 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Mon, 4 Feb 2019 16:35:55 -0800 (PST), George Herold
gherold_at_teachspin.com> wrote:

On Monday, February 4, 2019 at 3:05:17 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
On 4 Feb 2019 11:38:17 -0800, Winfield Hill <hill_at_rowland.harvard.edu
wrote:

John Larkin wrote...
Phil Hobbs wrote:

So what are you using exactly? 6 W/m/k is quite decent.

TW-T600-2MM from 3G Shielding. I start with 2mm material
and squash it down to 1mm, which doesn't take a lot of force.

I've tested it and the thermal conductivity really is
close to 6, compressed.

I got some T600 samples last week. I wonder, does the
thermal conductivity have full inverse proportionality
to squashed thickness? They don't address compression
on the datasheet, although thickness is in the formula.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/bt8jrz77m159327/3G_TW_3.JPG?dl=0

Those measurements are obviously pretty rough.

Of course, squashing reduces both specific thermal conductivity and
thickness. That's a double whammy on theta.

The dielectric strength is 6 KV/mm.

It's fun stuff, strongly resembling used chewing gum.
Yuck, how long does it last?

Most of the flavor is gone in a half hour.
Guffaw!


GH
Quote:


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics



Guest

Tue Feb 05, 2019 4:45 pm   



John S <Sophi.2_at_invalid.org> wrote in
news:q3c85q$1hl$2_at_dont-email.me:

Quote:
On 2/4/2019 4:51 PM, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org
wrote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
news:f8ef5e53v447p1kqj5v63fc2tjfu50de1q_at_4ax.com:


Filled epoxy isn't a good thermal conductor because it's still
mostly epoxy.

You are not very bright. Your inane lean toward thinking that no
one else in the world has any brains is as annoying as it gets.

The industry has apparently been miles ahead of your inane
first use
decisions about it. You obviousLY never scientifically research
anything. .

You are a punk, at best.


Is inane your new word of the day?


No, but today it matches your behavior.

John S
Guest

Tue Feb 05, 2019 4:45 pm   



On 2/4/2019 5:01 PM, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org wrote:
Quote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
news:5egf5e5lklq6agedgmqtce5b57b6nmuefa_at_4ax.com:

Most IR imagers are designed for architectural use; they won't focus
closer than a few feet, and the pixel counts are pitiful. The low-end
Flir units aren't much good for electronics.



You're an abject idiot.


But he's correct.

John S
Guest

Tue Feb 05, 2019 4:45 pm   



On 2/4/2019 4:51 PM, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org wrote:
Quote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
news:f8ef5e53v447p1kqj5v63fc2tjfu50de1q_at_4ax.com:


Filled epoxy isn't a good thermal conductor because it's still mostly
epoxy.

You are not very bright. Your inane lean toward thinking that no one
else in the world has any brains is as annoying as it gets.

The industry has apparently been miles ahead of your inane first use
decisions about it. You obviousLY never scientifically research
anything. .

You are a punk, at best.


Is inane your new word of the day?


Guest

Tue Feb 05, 2019 4:45 pm   



John S <Sophi.2_at_invalid.org> wrote in
news:q3c7p4$1hl$1_at_dont-email.me:

Quote:
On 2/4/2019 5:01 PM, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org
wrote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
news:5egf5e5lklq6agedgmqtce5b57b6nmuefa_at_4ax.com:

Most IR imagers are designed for architectural use; they won't
focus closer than a few feet, and the pixel counts are pitiful.
The low-end Flir units aren't much good for electronics.



You're an abject idiot.


But he's correct.


Sorry, but you and he are BOTH wrong. FLIR's $1500 bottom of the
line unit examines circuit boards and spot temps just fine.

John S
Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 3:45 am   



On 2/5/2019 9:16 AM, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org wrote:
Quote:
John S <Sophi.2_at_invalid.org> wrote in
news:q3c7p4$1hl$1_at_dont-email.me:

On 2/4/2019 5:01 PM, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org
wrote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
news:5egf5e5lklq6agedgmqtce5b57b6nmuefa_at_4ax.com:

Most IR imagers are designed for architectural use; they won't
focus closer than a few feet, and the pixel counts are pitiful.
The low-end Flir units aren't much good for electronics.



You're an abject idiot.


But he's correct.


Sorry, but you and he are BOTH wrong. FLIR's $1500 bottom of the
line unit examines circuit boards and spot temps just fine.


Yes, you're sorry.

John Larkin
Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 5:45 am   



On Tue, 5 Feb 2019 15:16:04 +0000 (UTC),
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org wrote:

Quote:
John S <Sophi.2_at_invalid.org> wrote in
news:q3c7p4$1hl$1_at_dont-email.me:

On 2/4/2019 5:01 PM, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org
wrote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
news:5egf5e5lklq6agedgmqtce5b57b6nmuefa_at_4ax.com:

Most IR imagers are designed for architectural use; they won't
focus closer than a few feet, and the pixel counts are pitiful.
The low-end Flir units aren't much good for electronics.



You're an abject idiot.


But he's correct.


Sorry, but you and he are BOTH wrong. FLIR's $1500 bottom of the
line unit examines circuit boards and spot temps just fine.


Got any pictures? About what's the size of the smallest resolvable hot
spot?

FLIR gave us one of these for free

https://www.dropbox.com/s/y8gjiyysz8tc3xd/Demo_Imager.JPG?dl=0

but we almost never use it. Among other faults, it's fixed-focus.





--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics

John Larkin
Guest

Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:45 pm   



On Tue, 5 Feb 2019 04:33:09 +0000 (UTC),
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org wrote:

Quote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
news:hn1i5ehopk7lmckon0j6lml8vgbrg254cj_at_4ax.com:

On Mon, 4 Feb 2019 23:00:21 +0000 (UTC),
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno_at_decadence.org wrote:

John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
news:u1ff5ehhiqrsnclplf9r0evc2i676ugghq_at_4ax.com:

Hard anodize is reliable up to about 200 volts. It's a pretty
good thermal conductor (because it's thin) but also adds a lot
of capacitance.



You are an idiot, and obviously know nothing or even less than
nothing
about hard anodized Aluminum properties.

OK, supply us some facts. Numbers, please.





500 volts per mil.


That does seem to be some sort of number. Well done.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com

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