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Phil Hobbs
Guest

Mon Apr 02, 2018 11:45 pm   



On 03/31/2018 10:57 AM, Jim Thompson wrote:
Quote:
On Fri, 30 Mar 2018 18:09:01 +0100, Peter Percival
peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall
begin by building a power supply. What voltages (at what currents)
should it supply? Where may I find circuits? Naturally, the devices
used should be easily obtainable.

Typically? Probably around 350VDC for the plate supply, 6.3VC and/or
12.6VAC for filaments.

As for the naysayers... there are still lots of things better done
with toobz than semiconductors.

It's always puzzled me that someone hasn't created a bipolar/tube
combo part that has the best of both worlds Wink

...Jim Thompson


Tubes can get you to places in voltage/current/capacitance space that no
semiconductor can touch. Back in about 1990, I used an 813 transmitting
tube to run the grid in an ion drift experiment, complete with a B
battery. ;)

Haven't used one since, except in gizmos others designed.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs


--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
https://hobbs-eo.com

Jim Thompson
Guest

Tue Apr 03, 2018 12:45 am   



On Mon, 2 Apr 2018 17:51:49 -0400, Phil Hobbs
<pcdhSpamMeSenseless_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

Quote:
On 03/31/2018 10:57 AM, Jim Thompson wrote:
On Fri, 30 Mar 2018 18:09:01 +0100, Peter Percival
peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall
begin by building a power supply. What voltages (at what currents)
should it supply? Where may I find circuits? Naturally, the devices
used should be easily obtainable.

Typically? Probably around 350VDC for the plate supply, 6.3VC and/or
12.6VAC for filaments.

As for the naysayers... there are still lots of things better done
with toobz than semiconductors.

It's always puzzled me that someone hasn't created a bipolar/tube
combo part that has the best of both worlds Wink

...Jim Thompson


Tubes can get you to places in voltage/current/capacitance space that no
semiconductor can touch. Back in about 1990, I used an 813 transmitting
tube to run the grid in an ion drift experiment, complete with a B
battery. ;)

Haven't used one since, except in gizmos others designed.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs


I've always been amused by the thought of a bipolar current mirror
_under_ the cathode of a tube (with grounded-grid)... I'll have to
take some time and analyze that configuration... probably will need
some kind of protective mechanism should the current mirror be "off".

...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson | mens |
| Analog Innovations | et |
| Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus |
| STV, Queen Creek, AZ 85142 Skype: skypeanalog | |
| Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat |
| E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 |

Understanding is a fountain of life to one who has it,
But the instruction of fools is folly. Proverbs 16:22

Jasen Betts
Guest

Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:45 am   



On 2018-04-02, George Herold <gherold_at_teachspin.com> wrote:

Quote:
Tubes are expensive. (and fragile)
How many $0.05 transistors does it take to replace a $50 tube?

Beside PMT's are there any tubes being made these days?


magentrons.

Also RS-online seems to have about 12 different types of amplifier tube
in stock.

--
This email has not been checked by half-arsed antivirus software

Phil Hobbs
Guest

Tue Apr 03, 2018 6:45 pm   



On 04/02/2018 07:06 PM, Jim Thompson wrote:
Quote:
On Mon, 2 Apr 2018 17:51:49 -0400, Phil Hobbs
pcdhSpamMeSenseless_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

On 03/31/2018 10:57 AM, Jim Thompson wrote:
On Fri, 30 Mar 2018 18:09:01 +0100, Peter Percival
peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall
begin by building a power supply. What voltages (at what currents)
should it supply? Where may I find circuits? Naturally, the devices
used should be easily obtainable.

Typically? Probably around 350VDC for the plate supply, 6.3VC and/or
12.6VAC for filaments.

As for the naysayers... there are still lots of things better done
with toobz than semiconductors.

It's always puzzled me that someone hasn't created a bipolar/tube
combo part that has the best of both worlds Wink

...Jim Thompson


Tubes can get you to places in voltage/current/capacitance space that no
semiconductor can touch. Back in about 1990, I used an 813 transmitting
tube to run the grid in an ion drift experiment, complete with a B
battery. ;)

Haven't used one since, except in gizmos others designed.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

I've always been amused by the thought of a bipolar current mirror
_under_ the cathode of a tube (with grounded-grid)... I'll have to
take some time and analyze that configuration... probably will need
some kind of protective mechanism should the current mirror be "off".

...Jim Thompson


That's commonly done in pulsed CO2 lasers--see this patent that came up
in Waymo v. Uber:
<https://electrooptical.net/www/sed/US4648093Sasnett.pdf>

Sasnett has a fun trick that partly anticipated the last remaining Waymo
patent.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs



--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
https://hobbs-eo.com

Tom Del Rosso
Guest

Mon Apr 30, 2018 2:45 am   



Jim Thompson wrote:
Quote:

As for the naysayers... there are still lots of things better done
with toobz than semiconductors.

It's always puzzled me that someone hasn't created a bipolar/tube
combo part that has the best of both worlds ;-)

...Jim Thompson


I've always been amused by the thought of a bipolar current mirror
_under_ the cathode of a tube (with grounded-grid)... I'll have to
take some time and analyze that configuration... probably will need
some kind of protective mechanism should the current mirror be "off".


Does it have to be integrated? You can always assemble the separate
parts.

Jim Thompson
Guest

Mon Apr 30, 2018 5:45 pm   



On Sun, 29 Apr 2018 20:57:29 -0400, "Tom Del Rosso"
<fizzbintuesday_at_that-google-mail-domain.com> wrote:

Quote:
Jim Thompson wrote:

As for the naysayers... there are still lots of things better done
with toobz than semiconductors.

It's always puzzled me that someone hasn't created a bipolar/tube
combo part that has the best of both worlds ;-)

...Jim Thompson


I've always been amused by the thought of a bipolar current mirror
_under_ the cathode of a tube (with grounded-grid)... I'll have to
take some time and analyze that configuration... probably will need
some kind of protective mechanism should the current mirror be "off".

Does it have to be integrated? You can always assemble the separate
parts.


Certainly. That's what I had in mind, some bipolar's "under" the
cathode.

...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson | mens |
| Analog Innovations | et |
| Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus |
| STV, Queen Creek, AZ 85142 Skype: skypeanalog | |
| Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat |
| E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 |

Thinking outside the box... producing elegant solutions,
by understanding what nature is hiding.

"It is not in doing what you like, but in liking what you do that
is the secret of happiness." -James Barrie

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