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news18
Guest

Mon Jan 28, 2019 11:45 pm   



I can not find the thread, but this seem the most appropriate place to
post.

the pretzel posted about some super dooper resolution mobile phone from
Huawei and receieved a general rebuff.

From the article at this link;
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/01/28/1920231/huawei-is-blocked-in-us-
but-its-chips-power-cameras-everywhere

it appears that this is possible.

Computer Nerd Kev
Guest

Wed Jan 30, 2019 10:45 pm   



news18 <news18_at_woa.com.au> wrote:
Quote:
I can not find the thread, but this seem the most appropriate place to
post.

the pretzel posted about some super dooper resolution mobile phone from
Huawei and receieved a general rebuff.

From the article at this link;
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/01/28/1920231/huawei-is-blocked-in-us-
but-its-chips-power-cameras-everywhere

it appears that this is possible.


So the company also makes chips for budget model security cameras.
What's to say that the picture quality of these cheap security
cameras isn't poor as well?

In both cases I'm sure that the resolution is as they say it
is, because that's easy to check. However whether the optical
quality is good enough for that resolution to be any more than
a waste of storage space, and whether it is simply produced by
upsampling a lower resolution image inside the imaging chip,
are the questions that determine whether there's anything
useful to be learned from the resolution specs.

--
__ __
#_ < |\| |< _#

Daniel60
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 8:45 am   



news18 wrote on 29/01/2019 9:15 AM:
Quote:
I can not find the thread, but this seem the most appropriate place to
post.

the pretzel posted about some super dooper resolution mobile phone from
Huawei and receieved a general rebuff.

From the article at this link;
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/01/28/1920231/huawei-is-blocked-in-us-
but-its-chips-power-cameras-everywhere

it appears that this is possible.

All this ka-fuf-ful about Huawei and the Internet has me intrigued!!


I use a Huawei 3G USB Dongle to connect to the Internet (like at this
very moment!!). Does this mean that Huawei is getting a copy of all my
e-mails (out and in!!)?? Does Hauwei know each and every website that I
visit??

Sort of reminds me of a rumour, several years ago, where if you had a
voice operated T.V., there was someone in New York (as I heard it) that
was listening to all the conversations in your lounge room, just in-case
you/someone told the T.V. to change channels or some such!!

--
Daniel

FMurtz
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 10:45 am   



Daniel60 wrote:
Quote:
news18 wrote on 29/01/2019 9:15 AM:
I can not find the thread, but this seem the most appropriate place to
post.

the pretzel posted about some super dooper resolution mobile phone from
Huawei and receieved a general rebuff.

 From the article at this link;
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/01/28/1920231/huawei-is-blocked-in-us-
but-its-chips-power-cameras-everywhere

it appears that this is possible.

All this ka-fuf-ful about Huawei and the Internet has me intrigued!!

I use a Huawei 3G USB Dongle to connect to the Internet (like at this
very moment!!). Does this mean that Huawei is getting a copy of all my
e-mails (out and in!!)?? Does Hauwei know each and every website that I
visit??

Sort of reminds me of a rumour, several years ago, where if you had a
voice operated T.V., there was someone in New York (as I heard it) that
was listening to all the conversations in your lounge room, just in-case
you/someone told the T.V. to change channels or some such!!

Yes but it is about the chinese government getting access.


news18
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 11:45 am   



On Fri, 01 Feb 2019 18:20:52 +1100, Daniel60 wrote:

Quote:
news18 wrote on 29/01/2019 9:15 AM:
I can not find the thread, but this seem the most appropriate place to
post.

the pretzel posted about some super dooper resolution mobile phone from
Huawei and receieved a general rebuff.

From the article at this link;
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/01/28/1920231/huawei-is-blocked-in-
us-
but-its-chips-power-cameras-everywhere

it appears that this is possible.

All this ka-fuf-ful about Huawei and the Internet has me intrigued!!

I use a Huawei 3G USB Dongle to connect to the Internet (like at this
very moment!!). Does this mean that Huawei is getting a copy of all my
e-mails (out and in!!)?? Does Hauwei know each and every website that I
visit??


Because they are a Chinese company, the chinese government can order them
to tap comms. WTF is different anywhere else. the 5 eyes is just pssed
that the chinese can have the same skills they have had for decades.

Sheesh, CISCO was called out decades ago.
Quote:

Sort of reminds me of a rumour, several years ago, where if you had a
voice operated T.V., there was someone in New York (as I heard it) that
was listening to all the conversations in your lounge room, just in-case
you/someone told the T.V. to change channels or some such!!


Now it s all automated, but because your voice command has to listen in
all the time, it can be tapped to hear you.

There is no a Crowd Supply (?) that sits on top of one of those google
devices and plays it white noise to cover your speech and somehow doesn't
allow the device to be activated until you give it a special command
first, then you can command the google(?) device. Or was it Apple.

since the device is a 3D printed rock or stuff, it allows decrative
printing and I reallyu like the fungi garden verion.

Computer Nerd Kev
Guest

Sat Feb 02, 2019 2:45 am   



Daniel60 <daniel47_at_eternal-september.org> wrote:
Quote:
All this ka-fuf-ful about Huawei and the Internet has me intrigued!!

I use a Huawei 3G USB Dongle to connect to the Internet (like at this
very moment!!). Does this mean that Huawei is getting a copy of all my
e-mails (out and in!!)?? Does Hauwei know each and every website that I
visit??


Emails would normally be encrypted so unless the Chinese have broken
some of the encryption algorithums that are still considered secure
by the industry (not that I'd rule it out), they wouldn't be able to
learn much from tapping into the raw network data via the modem. If
you were really important, I guess some useful hints might be learned
by simply looking at the quantity and frequency of Email data that
you access.

For the web, a compromised modem could tell them about every website
you visit by looking at the DNS resolution and IP address
information. If the website uses HTTPS, then they won't know what
information you are sending and receiving, but if you spent 10 hours
a day looking at "www.ihatechina.com", that fact might be enough to
give them suspicions on its own.

Personally I'm right now using a 3G ZTE modem for all my internet,
which is another Chinese company and probably no more trustworthy.
I'm planning to switch to a 4G modem from Sierra Wireless once I
(maybe "if I") sort out some driver issues with the OpenWRT Operating
System running on my wifi router, which the modem plugs into. I
avoided a Chinese-designed modem not particularly for fear over them
watching my every move, but because Huawei now dominate the mobile
broadband modem market entirely in Australia (at least for Telstra
and Optus), and they seem to have stopped offering any modems that
can be controlled explicitly by the user.

That is to say, all their modems now insist on working via web
interfaces so that you can't use software on your computer (in my
case, my router) to directly tell them whether to, and how to,
connect. Plus they run their own networking software on the modem,
which exposes it to a risk of being hacked. It would probably also
make it easier to forward info to the Chinese government, though
I won't pretend that the old modems couldn't have been set up to
do that as well.

As for the government's worries about Huawei. As Misfit noted, that's
much more about the Chinese shutting down the country's internet if
we got on the wrong side of them. Network connected infrastructure
has already proven difficult to protect against hackers. But if the
protections themselves were written by your enemy, then you haven't
got much hope. Of course that would still apply to modems and phones
- an unhackable network isn't much good if all the devices to use
with it have been shut down by the Chinese, and I could only buy my
non-Chinese 4G modem 2nd-hand because, as far as I can tell, Huawei
is now the only game in town (Telstra-compatible, anyway).

Quote:
Sort of reminds me of a rumour, several years ago, where if you had a
voice operated T.V., there was someone in New York (as I heard it) that
was listening to all the conversations in your lounge room, just in-case
you/someone told the T.V. to change channels or some such!!


I doubt that one, but it's more likely that they're all saved for
future reference somewhere. Amazon were caught out for that recently,
though I think only for conversations where the device picked up its
"keyword".

--
__ __
#_ < |\| |< _#

news18
Guest

Sat Feb 02, 2019 3:45 am   



On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 12:43:24 +1300, ~misfit~ wrote:

Quote:
Once upon a time on usenet Daniel60 wrote:
news18 wrote on 29/01/2019 9:15 AM:
I can not find the thread, but this seem the most appropriate place to
post.

the pretzel posted about some super dooper resolution mobile phone
from Huawei and receieved a general rebuff.

From the article at this link;
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/01/28/1920231/huawei-is-blocked-in-
us-
but-its-chips-power-cameras-everywhere

it appears that this is possible.

All this ka-fuf-ful about Huawei and the Internet has me intrigued!!

Do tell!

I use a Huawei 3G USB Dongle to connect to the Internet (like at this
very moment!!). Does this mean that Huawei is getting a copy of all my
e-mails (out and in!!)?? Does Hauwei know each and every website that I
visit??

USB dongles and your emails are neither here nor their in the grand
scheme of things.

What's worrying most five-eyes nations is that Huawei is by far the
cheapest bidder for the supply and installation of 5G *infrastructure*
equipment. What with the way the Chinese government and Chinese
companies work and the fact that, if there's another global conflict
there's a 50/50 chance China will be on the other side (not to mention
proven state-sponsored Chinese hacking into Western companies and
foreign electoral systems).

Lol, Huawei had nothing to do with the sharing of the plans form the new
Canberra spy depot and the complete plans, after upgrade to the australa
parliament house.
"Proven", funny how other counntries are saying no proof has ever been
shown to them and the 5 eyes are unable to prove anything, despite plenty
of request.


Quote:
Well there's a chance that not only could
crucial data be stolen or manipulated at the pipeline level but also
whole critical systems could be remotely shut down in times of war.


They would have to better than the current kit on CISCO then, where ll
the current hacks are happenng.

news18
Guest

Sat Feb 02, 2019 3:45 am   



On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 01:17:07 +0000, Computer Nerd Kev wrote:

Quote:
Daniel60 <daniel47_at_eternal-september.org> wrote:
All this ka-fuf-ful about Huawei and the Internet has me intrigued!!

I use a Huawei 3G USB Dongle to connect to the Internet (like at this
very moment!!). Does this mean that Huawei is getting a copy of all my
e-mails (out and in!!)?? Does Hauwei know each and every website that I
visit??

Emails would normally be encrypted


Nope, emails are not normally encrypted, unless you and the recipient
agree to do so.

Computer Nerd Kev
Guest

Sat Feb 02, 2019 4:45 am   



news18 <news18_at_woa.com.au> wrote:
Quote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 01:17:07 +0000, Computer Nerd Kev wrote:

Daniel60 <daniel47_at_eternal-september.org> wrote:
All this ka-fuf-ful about Huawei and the Internet has me intrigued!!

I use a Huawei 3G USB Dongle to connect to the Internet (like at this
very moment!!). Does this mean that Huawei is getting a copy of all my
e-mails (out and in!!)?? Does Hauwei know each and every website that I
visit??

Emails would normally be encrypted

Nope, emails are not normally encrypted, unless you and the recipient
agree to do so.


To protect against this attack, they're encrypted during transit. If
the Chinese hack into your Email provider's server and read everything
there, that's a different issue which is delt with by using end-to-end
encryption.

--
__ __
#_ < |\| |< _#

Daniel60
Guest

Sat Feb 02, 2019 1:45 pm   



Computer Nerd Kev wrote on 2/02/2019 1:48 PM:
Quote:
news18 <news18_at_woa.com.au> wrote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 01:17:07 +0000, Computer Nerd Kev wrote:

Daniel60 <daniel47_at_eternal-september.org> wrote:
All this ka-fuf-ful about Huawei and the Internet has me intrigued!!

I use a Huawei 3G USB Dongle to connect to the Internet (like at this
very moment!!). Does this mean that Huawei is getting a copy of all my
e-mails (out and in!!)?? Does Hauwei know each and every website that I
visit??

Emails would normally be encrypted

Nope, emails are not normally encrypted, unless you and the recipient
agree to do so.

To protect against this attack, they're encrypted during transit. If
the Chinese hack into your Email provider's server and read everything
there, that's a different issue which is delt with by using end-to-end
encryption.

That would/could be possible *IF* I were only conversing with only one
distant e-mail address, but if I were conversing with 50/500/whatever
e-mail addresses, then I would need to encrypt each and every e-mail, so
would that mean I would have 50/500/whatever encryption seeds .... or
would we all be using the same seed ... or something else??

--
Daniel

news18
Guest

Sun Feb 03, 2019 12:45 am   



On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 23:17:51 +1100, Daniel60 wrote:

Quote:
Computer Nerd Kev wrote on 2/02/2019 1:48 PM:
news18 <news18_at_woa.com.au> wrote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 01:17:07 +0000, Computer Nerd Kev wrote:

Daniel60 <daniel47_at_eternal-september.org> wrote:
All this ka-fuf-ful about Huawei and the Internet has me intrigued!!

I use a Huawei 3G USB Dongle to connect to the Internet (like at
this very moment!!). Does this mean that Huawei is getting a copy of
all my e-mails (out and in!!)?? Does Hauwei know each and every
website that I visit??

Emails would normally be encrypted

Nope, emails are not normally encrypted, unless you and the recipient
agree to do so.

To protect against this attack, they're encrypted during transit. If
the Chinese hack into your Email provider's server and read everything
there, that's a different issue which is delt with by using end-to-end
encryption.

That would/could be possible *IF* I were only conversing with only one
distant e-mail address, but if I were conversing with 50/500/whatever
e-mail addresses, then I would need to encrypt each and every e-mail, so
would that mean I would have 50/500/whatever encryption seeds .... or
would we all be using the same seed ... or something else??


If you use PGP, you just encrypt each message with the public key of the
recipients. This way, the message Is encrpyted end-to-end irrespective of
what mailer is used and only the recipient csn decrypt it.

If you use a mail service that encrpyts its communications with you, then
the message itself is NOT encrpyted outside the link between your mail
client and the mail server.

Note, in all cases, GovCo is probably collecting metadata of From Who To
Whom, Subject and all the other stuff contained in the message Header
which isn't the three line listing of stuff at the tyop of printed
messages.

Unless, you are using a VPN to somewhere and contact your mail service
through that VPN, in which case some other GovCo is probably collecting
that data.

Computer Nerd Kev
Guest

Sun Feb 03, 2019 12:45 am   



Daniel60 <daniel47_at_eternal-september.org> wrote:
Quote:
Computer Nerd Kev wrote on 2/02/2019 1:48 PM:
news18 <news18_at_woa.com.au> wrote:

Nope, emails are not normally encrypted, unless you and the recipient
agree to do so.

To protect against this attack, they're encrypted during transit. If
the Chinese hack into your Email provider's server and read everything
there, that's a different issue which is delt with by using end-to-end
encryption.

That would/could be possible *IF* I were only conversing with only one
distant e-mail address, but if I were conversing with 50/500/whatever
e-mail addresses, then I would need to encrypt each and every e-mail, so
would that mean I would have 50/500/whatever encryption seeds .... or
would we all be using the same seed ... or something else??


You would need to use 50/500/whatever encryption seeds, but the seed,
or key, is permanently linked to, and shared by, every recipient that
you send an Email to. Therefore it should require no more effort, and
no more security, than the recipient's Email address itself.

This is possible using Public-Key encryption, the recipient's private
key is required in order to decrypt messages encrypted with their
public key. So anyone can have the public key in case they want to
encrypt an Email to send to that address, but only the recipient
has the private key that allows them to decrypt those Emails.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-key_cryptography

PGP is an implementation of this approach which is commonly applied
to Email:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pretty_Good_Privacy

All the same, your recipient has to have generated their public
and private keys, shared the public one with you, and installed
software to decrypt messages sent by you using their private key.

How exactly you would approach a typical "Sent from my iPhone" Email
user, who you don't have a close relationship with, in order to have
them set this up before you Email them. I'm not sure. I bet you'd
have an even harder time when dealing with most businesses who aren't
security/computer related.

Just to reiterate though, this isn't required to protect against
a Chinese 3G mobile broadband modem that's decided to spy on you. The
standard TLS encryption to/from your Email server is enough to
protect against that. This is to protect against your Email server
(or your recipient's) being hacked, or having a backdoor installed.

Some Email services claim to encrypt your data when they store it
on their servers as well, however you can never be sure that there
isn't a backdoor. The story of Lavabit Email in the US shows how
Email companies are at the mercy of their government when it comes
to non-end-to-end encryption:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lavabit

--
__ __
#_ < |\| |< _#

Daniel60
Guest

Sun Feb 03, 2019 10:45 am   



Computer Nerd Kev wrote on 3/02/2019 10:43 AM:
Quote:
Daniel60 <daniel47_at_eternal-september.org> wrote:
Computer Nerd Kev wrote on 2/02/2019 1:48 PM:
news18 <news18_at_woa.com.au> wrote:

Nope, emails are not normally encrypted, unless you and the recipient
agree to do so.

To protect against this attack, they're encrypted during transit. If
the Chinese hack into your Email provider's server and read everything
there, that's a different issue which is delt with by using end-to-end
encryption.

That would/could be possible *IF* I were only conversing with only one
distant e-mail address, but if I were conversing with 50/500/whatever
e-mail addresses, then I would need to encrypt each and every e-mail, so
would that mean I would have 50/500/whatever encryption seeds .... or
would we all be using the same seed ... or something else??

You would need to use 50/500/whatever encryption seeds, but the seed,
or key, is permanently linked to, and shared by, every recipient that
you send an Email to. Therefore it should require no more effort, and
no more security, than the recipient's Email address itself.

This is possible using Public-Key encryption, the recipient's private
key is required in order to decrypt messages encrypted with their
public key. So anyone can have the public key in case they want to
encrypt an Email to send to that address, but only the recipient
has the private key that allows them to decrypt those Emails.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-key_cryptography

PGP is an implementation of this approach which is commonly applied
to Email:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pretty_Good_Privacy

All the same, your recipient has to have generated their public
and private keys, shared the public one with you, and installed
software to decrypt messages sent by you using their private key.

How exactly you would approach a typical "Sent from my iPhone" Email
user, who you don't have a close relationship with, in order to have
them set this up before you Email them. I'm not sure. I bet you'd
have an even harder time when dealing with most businesses who aren't
security/computer related.

Just to reiterate though, this isn't required to protect against
a Chinese 3G mobile broadband modem that's decided to spy on you. The
standard TLS encryption to/from your Email server is enough to
protect against that. This is to protect against your Email server
(or your recipient's) being hacked, or having a backdoor installed.

Some Email services claim to encrypt your data when they store it
on their servers as well, however you can never be sure that there
isn't a backdoor. The story of Lavabit Email in the US shows how
Email companies are at the mercy of their government when it comes
to non-end-to-end encryption:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lavabit

Thanks to you and news18 for responding .... still hasn't convinced me
.... but as I have very little need to worry about this stuff as I
understand it, I'm not losing much sleep! ;-)

--
Daniel

Jasen Betts
Guest

Sun Feb 03, 2019 11:45 pm   



On 2019-02-02, news18 <news18_at_woa.com.au> wrote:
Quote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 23:17:51 +1100, Daniel60 wrote:

Computer Nerd Kev wrote on 2/02/2019 1:48 PM:
news18 <news18_at_woa.com.au> wrote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 01:17:07 +0000, Computer Nerd Kev wrote:

Daniel60 <daniel47_at_eternal-september.org> wrote:
All this ka-fuf-ful about Huawei and the Internet has me intrigued!!

I use a Huawei 3G USB Dongle to connect to the Internet (like at
this very moment!!). Does this mean that Huawei is getting a copy of
all my e-mails (out and in!!)?? Does Hauwei know each and every
website that I visit??

Emails would normally be encrypted

Nope, emails are not normally encrypted, unless you and the recipient
agree to do so.

To protect against this attack, they're encrypted during transit. If
the Chinese hack into your Email provider's server and read everything
there, that's a different issue which is delt with by using end-to-end
encryption.

That would/could be possible *IF* I were only conversing with only one
distant e-mail address, but if I were conversing with 50/500/whatever
e-mail addresses, then I would need to encrypt each and every e-mail, so
would that mean I would have 50/500/whatever encryption seeds .... or
would we all be using the same seed ... or something else??

If you use PGP, you just encrypt each message with the public key of the
recipients. This way, the message Is encrpyted end-to-end irrespective of
what mailer is used and only the recipient csn decrypt it.

If you use a mail service that encrpyts its communications with you, then
the message itself is NOT encrpyted outside the link between your mail
client and the mail server.

Note, in all cases, GovCo is probably collecting metadata of From Who To
Whom, Subject and all the other stuff contained in the message Header
which isn't the three line listing of stuff at the tyop of printed
messages.

Unless, you are using a VPN to somewhere and contact your mail service
through that VPN, in which case some other GovCo is probably collecting
that data.


If yuore using a VPN you need to trust the VPN operatior's resistance
to GovCo.

--
When I tried casting out nines I made a hash of it.

Rod Speed
Guest

Tue Feb 05, 2019 12:45 am   



"Daniel60" <daniel47_at_eternal-september.org> wrote in message
news:q30s0n$oh6$1_at_dont-email.me...
Quote:
news18 wrote on 29/01/2019 9:15 AM:
I can not find the thread, but this seem the most appropriate place to
post.

the pretzel posted about some super dooper resolution mobile phone from
Huawei and receieved a general rebuff.

From the article at this link;
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/01/28/1920231/huawei-is-blocked-in-us-
but-its-chips-power-cameras-everywhere

it appears that this is possible.

All this ka-fuf-ful about Huawei and the Internet has me intrigued!!

I use a Huawei 3G USB Dongle to connect to the Internet (like at this very
moment!!). Does this mean that Huawei is getting a copy of all my e-mails
(out and in!!)?? Does Hauwei know each and every website that I visit??


Corse they do.

Quote:
Sort of reminds me of a rumour, several years ago, where if you had a
voice operated T.V., there was someone in New York (as I heard it) that
was listening to all the conversations in your lounge room, just in-case
you/someone told the T.V. to change channels or some such!!


And the phones do too now.

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