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PRC as a amplifier in GPS question.

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Olav Wölfelschneider
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Brett wrote:
Quote:
Since the ATMega128 can't handle100mbps (ISA bus is too slow) isn't the
issue is moot?

You forget the suits.

Being able to put "100 MBit/s capable" into the glossy feature sheet may
be a sales advantage. Even though it doesn't make much sense
technically...


--
Olav Wölfelschneider usenet03q02_at_wosch.teratronik.com

Craig Rodgers
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Quote:
Well if you can switch cores, there's:

http://www.microcontroller.com/news/dallas_8051_ethernet.asp

Or if not, why didn't you like:

http://www.smsc.com/main/catalog/lan91c111.html

--
- Mark -
--

at this stage I'd rather not switch cores simple because i don't have the
development tools to play with the 8051 you've sugested, although it does
look like a very attractive micro.

Do you have any idea who distributes the LAN91C111 in Australia?

Regards
Craig

Tauno Voipio
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Craig Rodgers" <craig_at_student.usyd.edu.au> wrote in message
news:bdchsa$4be$1_at_spacebar.ucc.usyd.edu.au...
Quote:

Well if you can switch cores, there's:

http://www.microcontroller.com/news/dallas_8051_ethernet.asp

Or if not, why didn't you like:

http://www.smsc.com/main/catalog/lan91c111.html

--
- Mark -
--

at this stage I'd rather not switch cores simple because i don't have the
development tools to play with the 8051 you've sugested, although it does
look like a very attractive micro.

Do you have any idea who distributes the LAN91C111 in Australia?


You have to build a byte cross-over buffer between the 8051 and 91C111 to
bridge the bus-width gap. LAN91C111 does not support 8 bit bus.

Think twice if 100 Mbit/s is really needed - for a 8051 even 10 Mbit/s is an
overkill.

Tauno Voipio
tauno voipio @ iki fi

rickman
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Hans-Bernhard Broeker wrote:
Quote:

In comp.arch.embedded Mark A. Odell <nospam_at_embeddedfw.com> wrote:
"Brett" <custserv_at_forums.ws> wrote in
news:bdcbjd$r4920$1_at_ID-184277.news.dfncis.de:

Since the ATMega128 can't handle100mbps (ISA bus is too slow) isn't the
issue is moot?

Line rate and the CPU/bus's ability to handle this speed are not
intertwined.
[...]

I would dare say they are, at least as far as dedicated point-to-point
lines are considered. Having a high-speed capable line sit unused for
the majority of the time is bound to be wasting some (costly) resource
somewhere.

And how exactly will a point to point environment be improved by
changing the ethernet from 100 Mbps to 10 Mbps? What costly resource
does 100 Mbps Ethernet have that a 10 Mbps Ethernet does not have?


Quote:
Shared-medium networks would be a different issue, obviously, but I
don't quite see what could be the benefit of having that buffer to
hold one complete Ethernet frame's worth of data on the embedded
device's end of that line, instead of at the hub, switch or whatever
is on the other end, where it'd usually be quite a bit easier to
accomodate it.

Yes, I can see that you don't understand. If you do all the math, you
will find that data going to the embedded target can travel at the full
rate and reach the target in less time. So the target can start working
on the data sooner. Likewise data being sent by the embedded target
will take less time if it travels at the higher rate freeing up the
buffer more quickly.


Quote:
The only thing that would really be improved by such a plan would be
the latency, not the bandwidth. Sending shorter packets might be a
better plan, in that case.

Shorter packets may make some number smaller that is reported by
software and you are equating with latency. But the real latency does
not change, and in fact may get worse. No one cares how quickly a part
of a buffer is sent. If the entire buffer needs to be sent before
processing can begin, breaking it into smaller packets buys you
nothing.

--

Rick "rickman" Collins

rick.collins_at_XYarius.com
Ignore the reply address. To email me use the above address with the XY
removed.

Arius - A Signal Processing Solutions Company
Specializing in DSP and FPGA design URL http://www.arius.com
4 King Ave 301-682-7772 Voice
Frederick, MD 21701-3110 301-682-7666 FAX

Don McKenzie
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Craig Rodgers wrote:

Quote:
Has anyone come across an ethernet controller that is relatively easy to
interface with a microcontroller?

Projec Systems ETHERNET Controlled Web Server at:
http://www.dontronics.com/projecsystems.html
may be of interest.

--
Don McKenzie E-mail: http://www.dontronics.com/e-mail.html
Home Page: http://www.dontronics.com

Add USB to your favorite Micro. http://www.dontronics.com/dlp.html
The World's Largest Range of Atmel/AVR & PICmicro Hardware and Software

Phil Allison
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Dave Horsfall" <daveh_at_ci.com.au> wrote in message
news:20030625231246.G16682_at_mippet.ci.com.au...
Quote:
On Wed, 25 Jun 2003, Phil Allison wrote:

** You insult me for fun - I tell the NG the facts about you.
The deal is that simple.

Rule #2 is that Allison will always try and have the last word, even unto
fantasising where necessary. <pavlov> It's also followed by abuse, as
you'll see </pavlov>.



** Calling you a horse's arse is an insult to horses.

BTW That killfile of yours it not working.


.............. Phil

Ewan Sinclair
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Quote:
I am looking for some information on wireless lan interfacing to micro
controllers, other than PC PCI or PCMCIA cards, is there any easy off
the shelf product, i am thinking of wireless access point and micro
controller with 10 base T interface.

I've no idea how much they cost, but these guys make embedded java
microcontrollers with built in ethernet:
http://www.ibutton.com/TINI/index.html

They have a complete solution on a board here:
http://www.ibutton.com/TINI/hardware/index.html
at the fairly reasonable cost of $50 (click on the sales and marketing link
to buy one). Although it seems there's an 8-12 week wait t get hold of one.

Ewan

Chris Oates
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Deamond" <bariko_at_des_oon.net> wrote in message
news:g2_Ja.1786$78.65630_at_news.siol.net...
Quote:
Hi..

What happens if I connect one Car Ignition coil
as a sound speaker to my radio?

Car won't start

Rudolf Ladyzhenskii
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Atmel has a reference design kit.

They use Crystal CS8900 chip. (I am putting one in a new design too). The
only drawback -- it is 10BaseT only, but I do not think you will use
100BaseT on a little micro anyway.

Rudolf

"Craig Rodgers" <craig_at_student.usyd.edu.au> wrote in message
news:bdcak4$fc$1_at_spacebar.ucc.usyd.edu.au...
Quote:
I'm trying to provide network capabilities for an 8 bit micro (AVRmega128)
and was wondering what sort Ethernet controllers people had used?



At the moment the controller I'm looking at using is the RTL8019AS (the
one
with the onboard ram) made by realtek, it was designed for the ISA bus and
delivers 10Mbs. Ideally I was looking for a controller that can deliver
100Mbs, but I can only find controllers designed for the PCI Bus,
something
I'm not game to try and drive with an 8 bit micro.



Has anyone come across an ethernet controller that is relatively easy to
interface with a microcontroller? Has anyone had any experience with the
8019?



Regards



Craig Rodgers




Ken Taylor
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Ewan Sinclair" <ewan_sinclair_at_hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:xVqKa.3351$ps6.438398_at_ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
Quote:
I am looking for some information on wireless lan interfacing to micro
controllers, other than PC PCI or PCMCIA cards, is there any easy off
the shelf product, i am thinking of wireless access point and micro
controller with 10 base T interface.

I've no idea how much they cost, but these guys make embedded java
microcontrollers with built in ethernet:
http://www.ibutton.com/TINI/index.html

They have a complete solution on a board here:
http://www.ibutton.com/TINI/hardware/index.html
at the fairly reasonable cost of $50 (click on the sales and marketing
link
to buy one). Although it seems there's an 8-12 week wait t get hold of
one.

Ewan

The TINI is one cool little beast, easy to use and (at least relatively)

cheap.

Ken

the swan
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Rudolf Ladyzhenskii wrote:
Quote:
Atmel has a reference design kit.

They use Crystal CS8900 chip. (I am putting one in a new design too). The
only drawback -- it is 10BaseT only, but I do not think you will use
100BaseT on a little micro anyway.

Rudolf

If you plan to use it in 8-bit mode be sure to do some research. There
are some gotchas and performance limitations with the CS8900 device in
8-bit mode.

Quote:

"Craig Rodgers" <craig_at_student.usyd.edu.au> wrote in message
news:bdcak4$fc$1_at_spacebar.ucc.usyd.edu.au...

I'm trying to provide network capabilities for an 8 bit micro (AVRmega128)
and was wondering what sort Ethernet controllers people had used?



At the moment the controller I'm looking at using is the RTL8019AS (the

one

with the onboard ram) made by realtek, it was designed for the ISA bus and
delivers 10Mbs. Ideally I was looking for a controller that can deliver
100Mbs, but I can only find controllers designed for the PCI Bus,

something

I'm not game to try and drive with an 8 bit micro.



Has anyone come across an ethernet controller that is relatively easy to
interface with a microcontroller? Has anyone had any experience with the
8019?



Regards



Craig Rodgers






Richard
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Craig,

This is the chip you want. NE2000 like the RTL8019AS, but 10/100; 5v
tolerant, but runs on 3.3v; LQFP-128 instead of TQFP-100. I've got one
wired to an Mega128 in 16-bit mode, due to a similar migration from the
RTL8019AS (for identical reasons). Only very slight extensions from
your NE2000 driver to configure the 100Mb features.

http://www.asix.com.tw/products/Ax88796.htm

For prototyping, this built board is actually cheaper than buying the
chips from Singapore (at least for the USA), and he'll sell you 1-off
chips too. Even with your proximity, you may find he offers a better
deal. (ASIX wanted $60USD for qty 1, plus s&h from Singapore.)

http://www.edtp.com/

The fellow who hosts this page also wrote an article in ~October 2002 in
CircuitCellar magazine discussing how to connect the Mega128 (in an
Atmel STK500 kit) with this proto board.


You are spot-on in your reasoning for switching controllers, although
technically the failing is in the RTL8019AS' ability to auto-negotiate.
It's just not part of the 10Mb spec.

While the 8019 can be forced into full-duplex mode to eliminate
collisions, detecting whether the switch is in FDX mode is a problem.
And this is also one of only two 8019 settings you can't elect through a
register - you have to install or emulate the EEPROM.

Cheers,
Richard

bobi
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



I got the Xport last week from Powercorp in Sydney. Very cool stuff. Soo
small. They are selling them as hot cakes and I was told I got the last one
for now.

"onestone" <onestone_at_bigpond.net.au> wrote in message
news:3EFA5636.EB726923_at_bigpond.net.au...
Quote:
Craig the part I mentioned is from Lantronix. At < AUS$75 in singles.
from www.powercorp.com.au on 02 9476 3466 but see Taunos comments
regarding current consumption.

Al

Craig Rodgers wrote:

I was particularly interested in 10/100 controllers because of the
network
environment this device was going to be used in. The network that this
device is initially going to be tested on consists of Catalyst 3000
series
switches. The 100Mbs expansion cards available on these switches do not
auto
negotiate with 10Mbs clients. I'd really like to be able to add auto
negotiation to my system to cover this possibility.

The amount of data actually being transferred is very small in the order
of
ten's of bytes.

Craig

"Hans-Bernhard Broeker" <broeker_at_physik.rwth-aachen.de> wrote in message
news:bdcdtm$sgq$1_at_nets3.rz.RWTH-Aachen.DE...
In comp.arch.embedded Mark A. Odell <nospam_at_embeddedfw.com> wrote:
"Brett" <custserv_at_forums.ws> wrote in
news:bdcbjd$r4920$1_at_ID-184277.news.dfncis.de:

Since the ATMega128 can't handle100mbps (ISA bus is too slow) isn't
the
issue is moot?

Line rate and the CPU/bus's ability to handle this speed are not
intertwined.
[...]

I would dare say they are, at least as far as dedicated point-to-point
lines are considered. Having a high-speed capable line sit unused for
the majority of the time is bound to be wasting some (costly) resource
somewhere.

Shared-medium networks would be a different issue, obviously, but I
don't quite see what could be the benefit of having that buffer to
hold one complete Ethernet frame's worth of data on the embedded
device's end of that line, instead of at the hub, switch or whatever
is on the other end, where it'd usually be quite a bit easier to
accomodate it.

The only thing that would really be improved by such a plan would be
the latency, not the bandwidth. Sending shorter packets might be a
better plan, in that case.

--
Hans-Bernhard Broeker (broeker_at_physik.rwth-aachen.de)
Even if all the snow were burnt, ashes would remain.


Andy, The Real
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Brian Goldsmith" <brian.goldsmith_at_nospamecho1.com.au> wrote in message
news:MqfKa.889$9g2.8662_at_news-server.bigpond.net.au...
Quote:

Use Google in future to find out what stuff means.

Having a bad day Phil??


*** I didn't notice you replying to the OP,were you having a bad day?
Brian
Goldsmith.

If you mean me, nope. Not having a bad day. I never have bad days!!

Andy, The Real
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Craig Rodgers" <craig_at_student.usyd.edu.au> wrote in message
news:bdcak4$fc$1_at_spacebar.ucc.usyd.edu.au...
Quote:
I'm trying to provide network capabilities for an 8 bit micro (AVRmega128)
and was wondering what sort Ethernet controllers people had used?



At the moment the controller I'm looking at using is the RTL8019AS (the
one
with the onboard ram) made by realtek, it was designed for the ISA bus and
delivers 10Mbs. Ideally I was looking for a controller that can deliver
100Mbs, but I can only find controllers designed for the PCI Bus,
something
I'm not game to try and drive with an 8 bit micro.



Has anyone come across an ethernet controller that is relatively easy to
interface with a microcontroller? Has anyone had any experience with the
8019?


The best one i have seen latey is the lantronix part that has the whole lot
in one RJ-45 socket. Good if your only doing a few, probably not so good if
you are an OEM. Soanar (polykom) do these parts. Not sure of the cost, but
I'm guessing they are probably not to badly priced.

Other solution is to use a NE2000 NIC. Dead simple!

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