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Andy, The Real
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Dave Horsfall" <daveh_at_ci.com.au> wrote in message
news:20030625104655.I36623_at_mippet.ci.com.au...
Quote:
On Tue, 24 Jun 2003, cdb wrote:

no no I haven't missed your point, but I though I was being helpful in
at
least you might be able to find out what the product codes related to.

Rule #1 in this newsgroup: don't bother correcting Allison, as like any
other psycho he takes it personally and responds with abuse. As you'll
soon see...

Unlike farnell, allison never makes mistakes...

Tom L
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 16:40:30 +1000, "Andy, The Real"
<ihatehifitrolls_at_yahoo.com.au> wrote:

Quote:

"Tom L" <void_at_nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:gu8gfvs4v2a1p2nfvjduh76o37c7gm8ha4_at_4ax.com...
On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 19:39:12 +1000, "Andy, The Real"
ihatehifitrolls_at_yahoo.com.au> waffled on about:

snip

This is why industry participation in teaching is such a good idea.

The two uni students working on their final year project with us
picked up Protel in a matter of hours with just a little instruction.

Thats right, with instruction. Without instruction how can you expect
someone to know how to draft up schematics? Offer the poor lad (las) some
help..


I did (all (s)he had to do was ask). See further down in the thread.

Still I doubt a student studying electronics could get through 3 years
of schooling and (probably) years of amateur interest in the subject
without seeing lots of schematics and how they should be drawn.

Wires drawn over components? IMH that's just stupid. At least he got
the left side input right side output bit correct, but that could have
been luck (50/50 chance).

Brian Goldsmith
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Andy, The Real" <ihatehifitrolls_at_yahoo.com.au> wrote
Quote:

What's the difference between a balanced and an unbalanced audio input?

I have heard of microphones that have an output which is out of phase
with
the main output. Is that the same thing?





** See http://www.sweetwater.com/insync/word.php?find=balanced


Use Google in future to find out what stuff means.

Having a bad day Phil??


*** I didn't notice you replying to the OP,were you having a bad day?
Brian
Goldsmith.

Glenn Pure
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Hi Don

As mentioned in the discussion on this when the programmer came out, a
design involving a single micro and little else would need heaps of
I/O lines (probably in the vicinity of 40 or so) - or an ordinary
amount of I/O and a pile of latches/buffers.

How are the USB interface prices looking now? I haven't checked
recently.

Cheers
Glenn

Don McKenzie <support2003**NOSPAM**@dontronics.com> wrote:

Quote:
PJ wrote:

What chips can it program? PIC16F84? AT90S8535?

No, it is only for Eproms.

I feel there are no Eprom programmer designs around today that are
really up to date.

A current one should be USB driven and powered, a single micro with
plenty of I/O, a ZIF socket, and not a lot more. A bit of voltage
doubling/regulation and switching circuitry.

--
Don McKenzie E-mail: http://www.dontronics.com/e-mail.html
Home Page: http://www.dontronics.com

Add USB to your favorite Micro. http://www.dontronics.com/dlp.html
The World's Largest Range of Atmel/AVR & PICmicro Hardware and Software


Dave Horsfall
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



On Wed, 25 Jun 2003, Andy, The Real wrote:

Quote:
Unlike farnell, allison never makes mistakes...

I'm sure he thought he did once, but of course he was mistaken.

-- Dave

Jason James
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Phil" <haxby_at_removethisbitandjustleave dodo.com.au> wrote in message
news:3ef8482a_at_news.comindico.com.au...
Quote:
What's the difference between a balanced and an unbalanced audio input?

I have heard of microphones that have an output which is out of phase with
the main output. Is that the same thing?

Cheers,
Phil

Unbalanced audio lines use earth as one leg of the audio-pair. As long as
the run is short, and no earth loops develop ( a condition where local earth
and the remote earth have different absolute potentials to true earth) this
is an acceptable way of transmitting audio. Unbalanced shielded cable is
used here.

Balanced lines have both legs equi-voltage above earth. This is the
preferred way over long lines. Balanced feed is resistant to magnetic fields
as both legs pickup simultaneously thus producing no resultant difference in
voltage between the two wires/legs.

The only reference to phase I'm famiar with re: mikes, is the anti-phase
noise suppresion feature on some mikes. This takes the form of an aperture
which when opened allows the diaphragm to pick-up room sound on both of it's
sides. The reasoning being noise is omni-present and will cancel, while
desired audio is directional and will not.

Jason

Mark A. Odell
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Craig Rodgers" <craig_at_student.usyd.edu.au> wrote in
news:bdcak4$fc$1_at_spacebar.ucc.usyd.edu.au:

Quote:
I'm trying to provide network capabilities for an 8 bit micro
(AVRmega128) and was wondering what sort Ethernet controllers people had
used?



At the moment the controller I'm looking at using is the RTL8019AS (the
one with the onboard ram) made by realtek, it was designed for the ISA
bus and delivers 10Mbs. Ideally I was looking for a controller that can
deliver 100Mbs, but I can only find controllers designed for the PCI Bus

Well if you can switch cores, there's:

http://www.microcontroller.com/news/dallas_8051_ethernet.asp

Or if not, why didn't you like:

http://www.smsc.com/main/catalog/lan91c111.html

--
- Mark ->
--

Brett
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Since the ATMega128 can't handle100mbps (ISA bus is too slow) isn't the
issue is moot?

"Craig Rodgers" <craig_at_student.usyd.edu.au> wrote in message
news:bdcak4$fc$1_at_spacebar.ucc.usyd.edu.au...
Quote:
I'm trying to provide network capabilities for an 8 bit micro (AVRmega128)
and was wondering what sort Ethernet controllers people had used?



At the moment the controller I'm looking at using is the RTL8019AS (the
one
with the onboard ram) made by realtek, it was designed for the ISA bus and
delivers 10Mbs. Ideally I was looking for a controller that can deliver
100Mbs, but I can only find controllers designed for the PCI Bus,
something
I'm not game to try and drive with an 8 bit micro.



Has anyone come across an ethernet controller that is relatively easy to
interface with a microcontroller? Has anyone had any experience with the
8019?



Regards



Craig Rodgers




Mark A. Odell
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Brett" <custserv_at_forums.ws> wrote in
news:bdcbjd$r4920$1_at_ID-184277.news.dfncis.de:

Quote:
I'm trying to provide network capabilities for an 8 bit micro
(AVRmega128) and was wondering what sort Ethernet controllers people
had used?

At the moment the controller I'm looking at using is the RTL8019AS (the
one
with the onboard ram) made by realtek, it was designed for the ISA bus
and delivers 10Mbs. Ideally I was looking for a controller that can
deliver 100Mbs, but I can only find controllers designed for the PCI
Bus,
something
I'm not game to try and drive with an 8 bit micro.

Has anyone come across an ethernet controller that is relatively easy
to interface with a microcontroller? Has anyone had any experience
with the 8019?

[top post fixed]

Quote:
Since the ATMega128 can't handle100mbps (ISA bus is too slow) isn't the
issue is moot?

Line rate and the CPU/bus's ability to handle this speed are not
intertwined. If the 100Mbit controller can buffer a full frame at 100Mbs
then it gives the CPU the ability to accept 100Mbs frames. Whether the CPU
and bus can keep up with large amounts of these frames is another issue. I
suspect that this design requires high line rate speed but not high data
rates. Kind of like running a serial at 115kBaud but only sending a couple
of characters per "long" unit of time.

--
- Mark ->
--

Markus Zingg
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Quote:
Has anyone come across an ethernet controller that is relatively easy to
interface with a microcontroller? Has anyone had any experience with the
8019?

Craig

The RTL8019 AS is 5 V only making it not the ideal candidate if you
have a 3.3V CPU. Another option is the Cyrrus logic cs8900a which is
also just 10Mb but available in a 3.3V variant. There is a 100MB chip
with ISA interface available from SMSC. The partnumber is something
like 9xxxx. You should easily find it if you browse their pages.

HTH

Markus

Tauno Voipio
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



"Mark A. Odell" <nospam_at_embeddedfw.com> wrote in message
news:Xns93A56A7E318E8lkj562ghjgk1k245lbvj_at_130.133.1.4...
Quote:
"Craig Rodgers" <craig_at_student.usyd.edu.au> wrote in
news:bdcak4$fc$1_at_spacebar.ucc.usyd.edu.au:

I'm trying to provide network capabilities for an 8 bit micro
(AVRmega128) and was wondering what sort Ethernet controllers people had
used?



At the moment the controller I'm looking at using is the RTL8019AS (the
one with the onboard ram) made by realtek, it was designed for the ISA
bus and delivers 10Mbs. Ideally I was looking for a controller that can
deliver 100Mbs, but I can only find controllers designed for the PCI Bus

Well if you can switch cores, there's:

http://www.microcontroller.com/news/dallas_8051_ethernet.asp

Or if not, why didn't you like:

http://www.smsc.com/main/catalog/lan91c111.html


For 10BASE-T, the SMSC LAN91C96 is a simpler and lower power alternative to
LAN91C111.

Tauno Voipio
tauno voipio @ iki fi

onestone
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



There is a device out there that embeds a complete 10/100 interface,
including a '186 micro, all the stacks etc into the Ethernet connector
socket. Around AUS$75, probably around US$35. pricey, but simple, and
very elegant.

the ad was in aaa local trade paper, I don't have that issue, but if you
still need it I'll post it back. I think Circuit cellar ran an article
using the same part in the last 2-3 months.

Al

Craig Rodgers wrote:
Quote:

I'm trying to provide network capabilities for an 8 bit micro (AVRmega128)
and was wondering what sort Ethernet controllers people had used?

At the moment the controller I'm looking at using is the RTL8019AS (the one
with the onboard ram) made by realtek, it was designed for the ISA bus and
delivers 10Mbs. Ideally I was looking for a controller that can deliver
100Mbs, but I can only find controllers designed for the PCI Bus, something
I'm not game to try and drive with an 8 bit micro.

Has anyone come across an ethernet controller that is relatively easy to
interface with a microcontroller? Has anyone had any experience with the
8019?

Regards

Craig Rodgers


Brett
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



There is a 3.3V and 5V version of the MCU he's using.

I was looking at SMSC, however the bus looks like it's 16 bits data... is
there an 8bit mode?

"Markus Zingg" <m.zingg_at_nct.ch> wrote in message
news:ftcjfv4nlkrbe6omj13qktts12tp8doskn_at_4ax.com...
Quote:
Has anyone come across an ethernet controller that is relatively easy to
interface with a microcontroller? Has anyone had any experience with the
8019?

Craig

The RTL8019 AS is 5 V only making it not the ideal candidate if you
have a 3.3V CPU. Another option is the Cyrrus logic cs8900a which is
also just 10Mb but available in a 3.3V variant. There is a 100MB chip
with ISA interface available from SMSC. The partnumber is something
like 9xxxx. You should easily find it if you browse their pages.

HTH

Markus


Hans-Bernhard Broeker
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



In comp.arch.embedded Mark A. Odell <nospam_at_embeddedfw.com> wrote:
Quote:
"Brett" <custserv_at_forums.ws> wrote in
news:bdcbjd$r4920$1_at_ID-184277.news.dfncis.de:

Since the ATMega128 can't handle100mbps (ISA bus is too slow) isn't the
issue is moot?

Line rate and the CPU/bus's ability to handle this speed are not
intertwined.
[...]


I would dare say they are, at least as far as dedicated point-to-point
lines are considered. Having a high-speed capable line sit unused for
the majority of the time is bound to be wasting some (costly) resource
somewhere.

Shared-medium networks would be a different issue, obviously, but I
don't quite see what could be the benefit of having that buffer to
hold one complete Ethernet frame's worth of data on the embedded
device's end of that line, instead of at the hub, switch or whatever
is on the other end, where it'd usually be quite a bit easier to
accomodate it.

The only thing that would really be improved by such a plan would be
the latency, not the bandwidth. Sending shorter packets might be a
better plan, in that case.

--
Hans-Bernhard Broeker (broeker_at_physik.rwth-aachen.de)
Even if all the snow were burnt, ashes would remain.

Joseph Goldburg
Guest

Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:23 am   



Hi Craig,

If you want Rapid TCP/IP connectivity in a Micro/Module.

You may want to look at the IPsil module
http://www.ipsil.com/products/d8930.htm

Full HTTP v1.0 compliant embedded webserver
Eight general purpose I/O pins, software-configurable as input or output
Modbus TCP support
10BaseT PHY/MAC support
Support DHCP or fixed IP addressing
Secure mode available requiring password for all access
512KB non-volatile memory available for storage of web objects (over 480KB
available for developer use)
Low cost/high performance

I think Adilam Elelctronics has them in stock

JG


"Craig Rodgers" <craig_at_student.usyd.edu.au> wrote in message
news:bdcak4$fc$1_at_spacebar.ucc.usyd.edu.au...
Quote:
I'm trying to provide network capabilities for an 8 bit micro (AVRmega128)
and was wondering what sort Ethernet controllers people had used?



At the moment the controller I'm looking at using is the RTL8019AS (the
one
with the onboard ram) made by realtek, it was designed for the ISA bus and
delivers 10Mbs. Ideally I was looking for a controller that can deliver
100Mbs, but I can only find controllers designed for the PCI Bus,
something
I'm not game to try and drive with an 8 bit micro.



Has anyone come across an ethernet controller that is relatively easy to
interface with a microcontroller? Has anyone had any experience with the
8019?



Regards



Craig Rodgers




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