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TTman
Guest

Tue Dec 25, 2018 11:45 am   



Just watched a few programs about the A10, Prowler and Growler...
Fascinating...
In my last job, I was working on military radar jamming (UK) and I
thought it was a 'modern' idea. Just goes to show how much you don't
know.Didn't know A10s were used to blanket jam IEDs in Iraq... and I
worked on IED jammers( vehicles) too and thought they were new.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

DLUNU
Guest

Tue Dec 25, 2018 3:45 pm   



TTman <kraken.sankey_at_gmail.com> wrote in news:pvt1le$atl$1_at_dont-
email.me:

Quote:
Just watched a few programs about the A10, Prowler and Growler...
Fascinating...
In my last job, I was working on military radar jamming (UK) and I
thought it was a 'modern' idea. Just goes to show how much you
don't
know.Didn't know A10s were used to blanket jam IEDs in Iraq... and
I
worked on IED jammers( vehicles) too and thought they were new.


I saw the A-10 cockpit and history at the National Air and Space
Museum. They were designed in the '60s. I was amazed at how old the
tech looked since they were main Gulf War players and still are. Out
of production since 1984. They had lots of upgrades in the last few
years of production.

https://www.military.com/equipment/a-10-thunderbolt-ii

Martin Riddle
Guest

Tue Dec 25, 2018 3:45 pm   



On Tue, 25 Dec 2018 10:43:58 +0000, TTman <kraken.sankey_at_gmail.com>
wrote:

Quote:
Just watched a few programs about the A10, Prowler and Growler...
Fascinating...
In my last job, I was working on military radar jamming (UK) and I
thought it was a 'modern' idea. Just goes to show how much you don't
know.Didn't know A10s were used to blanket jam IEDs in Iraq... and I
worked on IED jammers( vehicles) too and thought they were new.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


I used to ride my bicycle past Fairchild. They would have the doors
for the painting bays open, the A10's could be seen in their green
chromate primer.

Now it's all retail space and a parking lot.

Cheers

bitrex
Guest

Tue Dec 25, 2018 5:45 pm   



On 12/25/2018 05:43 AM, TTman wrote:
Quote:
Just watched a few programs about the A10, Prowler and Growler...
Fascinating...
In my last job, I was working on military radar jamming (UK) and I
thought it was a 'modern' idea. Just goes to show how much you don't
know.Didn't know A10s were used to blanket jam IEDs in Iraq... and I
worked on IED jammers( vehicles) too and thought they were new.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


The A-10 is a popular plane with everyone apparently except the Air
Force senior staff who's been trying to get rid of it for about 30 years

<https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a15914932/the-air-force-is-re-winging-a-10s-after-all/>

bitrex
Guest

Tue Dec 25, 2018 5:45 pm   



On 12/25/2018 09:21 AM, DLUNU wrote:
Quote:
TTman <kraken.sankey_at_gmail.com> wrote in news:pvt1le$atl$1_at_dont-
email.me:

Just watched a few programs about the A10, Prowler and Growler...
Fascinating...
In my last job, I was working on military radar jamming (UK) and I
thought it was a 'modern' idea. Just goes to show how much you
don't
know.Didn't know A10s were used to blanket jam IEDs in Iraq... and
I
worked on IED jammers( vehicles) too and thought they were new.


I saw the A-10 cockpit and history at the National Air and Space
Museum. They were designed in the '60s. I was amazed at how old the
tech looked since they were main Gulf War players and still are. Out
of production since 1984. They had lots of upgrades in the last few
years of production.

https://www.military.com/equipment/a-10-thunderbolt-ii



The USAF leadership hates it so much apparently they'll do whatever it
takes to get rid of it:

<https://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/at-what-point-does-the-usafs-war-against-the-a-10-becom-1685239179>

It wins fights. It doesn't have an app and it's not Web 2.0. Doesn't
cost enough. Not popular with them I guess

bitrex
Guest

Tue Dec 25, 2018 5:45 pm   



On 12/25/2018 11:31 AM, bitrex wrote:
Quote:
On 12/25/2018 09:21 AM, DLUNU wrote:
TTman <kraken.sankey_at_gmail.com> wrote in news:pvt1le$atl$1_at_dont-
email.me:

Just watched a few programs about the A10, Prowler and Growler...
Fascinating...
In my last job, I was working on military radar jamming (UK) and I
thought it was a 'modern' idea. Just goes to show how much you
don't
know.Didn't know A10s were used to blanket jam IEDs in Iraq... and
I
worked on IED jammers( vehicles) too and thought they were new.


   I saw the A-10 cockpit and history at the National Air and Space
Museum.  They were designed in the '60s.  I was amazed at how old the
tech looked since they were main Gulf War players and still are.  Out
of production since 1984. They had lots of upgrades in the last few
years of production.

https://www.military.com/equipment/a-10-thunderbolt-ii


The USAF leadership hates it so much apparently they'll do whatever it
takes to get rid of it:

https://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/at-what-point-does-the-usafs-war-against-the-a-10-becom-1685239179


It wins fights. It doesn't have an app and it's not Web 2.0. Doesn't
cost enough. Not popular with them I guess


Meanwhile Microsoft got a ~$500 million contract to develop this thing
lol nobody is going to wear this goofy 1980s Sega Genesis-looking helmet
in combat:

<https://techcrunch.com/2018/11/28/microsoft-wins-480m-military-contract-to-outfit-soldiers-with-hololens-ar-tech/>

DLUNU
Guest

Wed Dec 26, 2018 12:45 am   



On Tue, 25 Dec 2018 11:35:52 -0500, bitrex wrote:

Quote:
Meanwhile Microsoft got a ~$500 million contract to develop this thing
lol nobody is going to wear this goofy 1980s Sega Genesis-looking helmet
in combat:


That is not even the price of one plane. A drop in the bucket.

Were it not for stealth advances, a respin of that craft would be great.

They could even re-use a lot of the design, like the Titanium bathtub
cockpit and avionics protections, and the mechanical failsafe actuators
that can be used even in the event of hydraulic failure.

The fact is that 5 drones are cheaper and carry a lot more effective
delivery of our message without the risk to personnel.

bitrex
Guest

Wed Dec 26, 2018 4:45 am   



On 12/25/2018 06:20 PM, DLUNU wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 25 Dec 2018 11:35:52 -0500, bitrex wrote:

Meanwhile Microsoft got a ~$500 million contract to develop this thing
lol nobody is going to wear this goofy 1980s Sega Genesis-looking helmet
in combat:

That is not even the price of one plane. A drop in the bucket.

Were it not for stealth advances, a respin of that craft would be great.

They could even re-use a lot of the design, like the Titanium bathtub
cockpit and avionics protections, and the mechanical failsafe actuators
that can be used even in the event of hydraulic failure.

The fact is that 5 drones are cheaper and carry a lot more effective
delivery of our message without the risk to personnel.


Don't know how well drones do in the close air support role. The A-10's
main role after hunting armor on the plains of Europe became less likely
was close air support.

In addition to chewing up armor the big gatling gun makes a very
effective and relatively cheap way to deal with things like snipers in
urban areas, it's about the closest thing to a "surgical" aerial weapon
there is.


Guest

Wed Dec 26, 2018 9:45 am   



On Wednesday, December 26, 2018 at 1:56:23 PM UTC+11, bitrex wrote:
Quote:
On 12/25/2018 06:20 PM, DLUNU wrote:
On Tue, 25 Dec 2018 11:35:52 -0500, bitrex wrote:

Meanwhile Microsoft got a ~$500 million contract to develop this thing
lol nobody is going to wear this goofy 1980s Sega Genesis-looking helmet
in combat:

That is not even the price of one plane. A drop in the bucket.

Were it not for stealth advances, a respin of that craft would be great.

They could even re-use a lot of the design, like the Titanium bathtub
cockpit and avionics protections, and the mechanical failsafe actuators
that can be used even in the event of hydraulic failure.

The fact is that 5 drones are cheaper and carry a lot more effective
delivery of our message without the risk to personnel.


Don't know how well drones do in the close air support role. The A-10's
main role after hunting armor on the plains of Europe became less likely
was close air support.

In addition to chewing up armor the big gatling gun makes a very
effective and relatively cheap way to deal with things like snipers in
urban areas, it's about the closest thing to a "surgical" aerial weapon
there is.


A big gatling gun chews up a lot of ammunition quickly. If the bullets are heavy enough to chew up armour, they are a trifle heavier than you need to cope with snipers. They do travel farther than lower-calibre ammunition, but "surgical" isn't quite the right word for that kind of strike.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Guest

Wed Dec 26, 2018 12:45 pm   



On Tuesday, 25 December 2018 10:44:02 UTC, TTman wrote:

Quote:
Just watched a few programs about the A10, Prowler and Growler...
Fascinating...
In my last job, I was working on military radar jamming (UK) and I
thought it was a 'modern' idea. Just goes to show how much you don't
know.Didn't know A10s were used to blanket jam IEDs in Iraq... and I
worked on IED jammers( vehicles) too and thought they were new.


The first radar systems in WW2 were jammed by both sides.


NT


Guest

Wed Dec 26, 2018 2:45 pm   



On Wednesday, December 26, 2018 at 10:16:04 PM UTC+11, tabb...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Tuesday, 25 December 2018 10:44:02 UTC, TTman wrote:

Just watched a few programs about the A10, Prowler and Growler...
Fascinating...
In my last job, I was working on military radar jamming (UK) and I
thought it was a 'modern' idea. Just goes to show how much you don't
know.Didn't know A10s were used to blanket jam IEDs in Iraq... and I
worked on IED jammers( vehicles) too and thought they were new.

The first radar systems in WW2 were jammed by both sides.


Obviously not very effectively.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Guest

Wed Dec 26, 2018 3:45 pm   



On Wednesday, December 26, 2018 at 2:53:01 AM UTC-5, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
Quote:
On Wednesday, December 26, 2018 at 1:56:23 PM UTC+11, bitrex wrote:
On 12/25/2018 06:20 PM, DLUNU wrote:
On Tue, 25 Dec 2018 11:35:52 -0500, bitrex wrote:

Meanwhile Microsoft got a ~$500 million contract to develop this thing
lol nobody is going to wear this goofy 1980s Sega Genesis-looking helmet
in combat:

That is not even the price of one plane. A drop in the bucket.

Were it not for stealth advances, a respin of that craft would be great.

They could even re-use a lot of the design, like the Titanium bathtub
cockpit and avionics protections, and the mechanical failsafe actuators
that can be used even in the event of hydraulic failure.

The fact is that 5 drones are cheaper and carry a lot more effective
delivery of our message without the risk to personnel.


Don't know how well drones do in the close air support role. The A-10's
main role after hunting armor on the plains of Europe became less likely
was close air support.

In addition to chewing up armor the big gatling gun makes a very
effective and relatively cheap way to deal with things like snipers in
urban areas, it's about the closest thing to a "surgical" aerial weapon
there is.

A big gatling gun chews up a lot of ammunition quickly. If the bullets are heavy enough to chew up armour, they are a trifle heavier than you need to cope with snipers. They do travel farther than lower-calibre ammunition, but "surgical" isn't quite the right word for that kind of strike.


It's not the caliber but the penetrating capacity and performance that's important. The A-10 gun uses DU ammunition. Snipers in urban warfare tend to be in sheltered positions. The DU round makes the concept of sheltered position irrelevant.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CiqAswPGqV4
Dumb video repeats halfway thru, maybe the average viewer has attention disorder.


Quote:

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney


DLUNU
Guest

Wed Dec 26, 2018 5:45 pm   



bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote in
news:fa6cf73f-ee07-479e-a50b-0d1cc822138d_at_googlegroups.com:

Quote:
It's not the caliber but the penetrating capacity and performance
that's important. The A-10 gun uses DU ammunition.


There are several types of projectiles used in the A-10 warthog's
gatling gun.

The fact is that even in a close support role, once an enemy placement
is discovered, they are likely to eat a hellfire as they are a gatling
strafe. Drones are used for CAS as well, and in those cases, the enemy
never even sees or hears the death coming.

DLUNU
Guest

Wed Dec 26, 2018 5:45 pm   



bill.sloman_at_ieee.org wrote in
news:36ccae70-b880-4efc-8e51-e699dc37f67b_at_googlegroups.com:

Quote:
On Wednesday, December 26, 2018 at 1:56:23 PM UTC+11, bitrex wrote:
On 12/25/2018 06:20 PM, DLUNU wrote:
On Tue, 25 Dec 2018 11:35:52 -0500, bitrex wrote:

Meanwhile Microsoft got a ~$500 million contract to develop
this thing lol nobody is going to wear this goofy 1980s Sega
Genesis-looking helm
et
in combat:

That is not even the price of one plane. A drop in the bucket.

Were it not for stealth advances, a respin of that craft
would be gr
eat.

They could even re-use a lot of the design, like the Titanium
bathtu
b
cockpit and avionics protections, and the mechanical failsafe
actuators that can be used even in the event of hydraulic
failure.

The fact is that 5 drones are cheaper and carry a lot more
effective
delivery of our message without the risk to personnel.


Don't know how well drones do in the close air support role. The
A-10's

main role after hunting armor on the plains of Europe became less
likely

was close air support.

In addition to chewing up armor the big gatling gun makes a very
effective and relatively cheap way to deal with things like
snipers in urban areas, it's about the closest thing to a
"surgical" aerial weapon

there is.

A big gatling gun chews up a lot of ammunition quickly. If the
bullets are heavy enough to chew up armour, they are a trifle
heavier than you need to cope with snipers. They do travel farther
than lower-calibre ammunition, but "surgical" isn't quite the right
word for that kind of strike.


There are several instances where a drone used a hellfire as an anti-
personnel device.

It is simple. Start shit with one of these drones watching from
overhead, and chances are high that you will eat a high explosive for
breakfast.

bitrex
Guest

Wed Dec 26, 2018 7:45 pm   



On 12/26/2018 08:04 AM, bill.sloman_at_ieee.org wrote:
Quote:
On Wednesday, December 26, 2018 at 10:16:04 PM UTC+11, tabb...@gmail.com wrote:
On Tuesday, 25 December 2018 10:44:02 UTC, TTman wrote:

Just watched a few programs about the A10, Prowler and Growler...
Fascinating...
In my last job, I was working on military radar jamming (UK) and I
thought it was a 'modern' idea. Just goes to show how much you don't
know.Didn't know A10s were used to blanket jam IEDs in Iraq... and I
worked on IED jammers( vehicles) too and thought they were new.

The first radar systems in WW2 were jammed by both sides.

Obviously not very effectively.


I recall reading the low frequency noise source used to randomly
modulate the frequency of the high power carrier for jamming was a
either a halogen lamp or tungsten arc lamp feeding CdS cells

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