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Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 3:45 am   



On Wednesday, January 2, 2019 at 4:09:57 AM UTC+11, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 10:30:57 -0800 (PST), whit3rd <whit3rd_at_gmail.com
wrote:
On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 8:21:05 PM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 03:14:19 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts
jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote:

Being usually right is not a remarkable skill.

It is in today's world.

Not at all. Most of my notebook pages never get red-line revision, because
they're fine the frst time.

frst time is fine?

'Usually right' is so commonplace, in fact,
that it's puzzling to hear someone getting something wrong; why
would that happen, you can (A) think it through, or (B) defer to an expert,
or (C) keep silence. It does take some broad knowledge to know
when to go with (B), though.

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.


John Larkin thinks that the experts are wrong in certain important fields (which he can't be bothered to specify). In reality, John Larkin is a gullible twit who has been suckered by a bunch of experts who are good at misleading gullible twits.

Quote:
Why would one think 'today's world' is full of errors? More likely, some
agressive stupidity or clickbait hype/ambiguity has come to your attention.

Economic crashes,


https://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/21/business/worldbusiness/21iht-admin.4.18853088.html

If Dubbya had listened to the experts who suggested that the US was having a house price bubble, the wolrd might not have been stuck with the global financial crisis.

"As early as 2006, top advisers to Bush dismissed warnings from people inside and outside the White House that housing prices were inflated and that a foreclosure crisis was looming. And when the economy deteriorated, Bush and his team misdiagnosed the reasons and scope of the downturn. As recently as February, for example, Bush was still calling it a "rough patch."

> epidemics,

We haven't had any decent sized epidemics recently - the experts have managed to contain them before they can run away.

> addiction,

The experts advise "harm reduction" while the religious right insists on a "war on drugs" which they evidently aren't winning.

> nations in poverty,

Getting nations out of poverty doesn't need much expertise, but it does need resources, which do tend to get stolen if the aid-providers arren't expert at their job.

> hunger,

Hunger is being dealt with - quite effectively - by improvements in agricultural technique. Where there's a war going on, the agricultural experts don't get much of chance to apply their expertise.

> wars,

We have lots of experts on fighting wars and ending them quickly. Trump doesn't seem to want to listen to any of them.

> and death have come to my attention.

Experts are quite good at delaying death, and getting better at it all the time, but human beings weren't designed at all, and the process of evolution concentrates on keeping organisms alive until they can reproduce, so any immediate expectation to be able to modify the human organism so that it can keep on working forever would be a non-expert's delusion.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Reinhardt Behm
Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 4:45 am   



AT Wednesday 02 January 2019 05:18, tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:

Quote:
On Tuesday, 1 January 2019 17:09:57 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 10:30:57 -0800 (PST), whit3rd <whit3rd_at_gmail.com
wrote:
On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 8:21:05 PM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 03:14:19 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts
jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote:

Being usually right is not a remarkable skill.

It is in today's world.

Not at all. Most of my notebook pages never get red-line revision,
because they're fine the frst time.

frst time is fine?

'Usually right' is so commonplace, in fact,
that it's puzzling to hear someone getting something wrong; why
would that happen, you can (A) think it through, or (B) defer to an
expert,
or (C) keep silence. It does take some broad knowledge to know
when to go with (B), though.

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.

and not in reality experts.


JL seems to be an expert on this.

Quote:


Why would one think 'today's world' is full of errors? More likely,
some agressive stupidity or clickbait hype/ambiguity has come to your
attention.

Economic crashes, epidemics, addiction, nations in poverty, hunger,
wars, and death have come to my attention.

and endless sucky UIs.


NT

--
Reinhardt


Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 4:45 am   



On Wednesday, January 2, 2019 at 1:51:22 PM UTC+11, Reinhardt Behm wrote:
Quote:
AT Wednesday 02 January 2019 05:18, tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Tuesday, 1 January 2019 17:09:57 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 10:30:57 -0800 (PST), whit3rd <whit3rd_at_gmail.com
wrote:
On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 8:21:05 PM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 03:14:19 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts
jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote:

Being usually right is not a remarkable skill.

It is in today's world.

Not at all. Most of my notebook pages never get red-line revision,
because they're fine the frst time.

frst time is fine?

'Usually right' is so commonplace, in fact,
that it's puzzling to hear someone getting something wrong; why
would that happen, you can (A) think it through, or (B) defer to an
expert,
or (C) keep silence. It does take some broad knowledge to know
when to go with (B), though.

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.

and not in reality experts.

JL seems to be an expert on this.


Like NT, John Larkin does seem to chose to get his world view from people who are expert on implanting a particular worldview in people who are gullible enough to be suckered by it.

This does involve making the gullible suckers distrustful of people who actually know what they are talking about, so that the gullible suckers will keep on putting money into the pockets of the people who sucker them.

John Larkin doesn't believe in climate change, and the people who want to keep on digging up fossil carbon and selling it as fuel want him (and a whole lot of other gullible suckers) to keep on thinking that way.

<snip>

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

John Larkin
Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 5:45 am   



On Tue, 1 Jan 2019 13:18:41 -0800 (PST), tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:

Quote:
On Tuesday, 1 January 2019 17:09:57 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 10:30:57 -0800 (PST), whit3rd <whit3rd_at_gmail.com
wrote:
On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 8:21:05 PM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 03:14:19 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts
jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote:

Being usually right is not a remarkable skill.

It is in today's world.

Not at all. Most of my notebook pages never get red-line revision, because
they're fine the frst time.

frst time is fine?

'Usually right' is so commonplace, in fact,
that it's puzzling to hear someone getting something wrong; why
would that happen, you can (A) think it through, or (B) defer to an expert,
or (C) keep silence. It does take some broad knowledge to know
when to go with (B), though.

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.

and not in reality experts.


Why would one think 'today's world' is full of errors? More likely, some
agressive stupidity or clickbait hype/ambiguity has come to your attention.

Economic crashes, epidemics, addiction, nations in poverty, hunger,
wars, and death have come to my attention.

and endless sucky UIs.


NT


Europeans love to make standards. Why isn't there an EU standard for
UIs? We have all sorts of gadgets that nobody can figure how to
operate.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics

John Larkin
Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 5:45 am   



On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 10:51:17 +0800, Reinhardt Behm
<rbehm_at_hushmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
AT Wednesday 02 January 2019 05:18, tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Tuesday, 1 January 2019 17:09:57 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 10:30:57 -0800 (PST), whit3rd <whit3rd_at_gmail.com
wrote:
On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 8:21:05 PM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 03:14:19 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts
jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote:

Being usually right is not a remarkable skill.

It is in today's world.

Not at all. Most of my notebook pages never get red-line revision,
because they're fine the frst time.

frst time is fine?

'Usually right' is so commonplace, in fact,
that it's puzzling to hear someone getting something wrong; why
would that happen, you can (A) think it through, or (B) defer to an
expert,
or (C) keep silence. It does take some broad knowledge to know
when to go with (B), though.

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.

and not in reality experts.

JL seems to be an expert on this.


My job is easy. I only have to design electronics that works.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics


Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:45 am   



On Wednesday, January 2, 2019 at 3:39:30 PM UTC+11, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 1 Jan 2019 13:18:41 -0800 (PST), tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Tuesday, 1 January 2019 17:09:57 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 10:30:57 -0800 (PST), whit3rd <whit3rd_at_gmail.com
wrote:
On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 8:21:05 PM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 03:14:19 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts
jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote:

Being usually right is not a remarkable skill.

It is in today's world.

Not at all. Most of my notebook pages never get red-line revision, because
they're fine the frst time.

frst time is fine?

'Usually right' is so commonplace, in fact,
that it's puzzling to hear someone getting something wrong; why
would that happen, you can (A) think it through, or (B) defer to an expert,
or (C) keep silence. It does take some broad knowledge to know
when to go with (B), though.

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.

and not in reality experts.


Why would one think 'today's world' is full of errors? More likely, some
agressive stupidity or clickbait hype/ambiguity has come to your attention.

Economic crashes, epidemics, addiction, nations in poverty, hunger,
wars, and death have come to my attention.

and endless sucky UIs.

Europeans love to make standards. Why isn't there an EU standard for
UIs? We have all sorts of gadgets that nobody can figure how to
operate.


The IEEE loves to make standards. The real problem with user interfaces is finding the people willing to operate them for long enough to find out whether they are user friendly, and paying them enough to keep them doing it, and manufacturers who are interested enough to pay them to do it.

I know at least one psychologist who did a lot of work on human factors (and wrote a paper on engineers doing it badly which we were never able to track down when I finally talked to him about it).

He's famous (and a fellow of the UK Royal Society) for rather different work.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Cursitor Doom
Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 8:45 pm   



On Tue, 01 Jan 2019 20:39:23 -0800, John Larkin wrote:

Quote:
Europeans love to make standards. Why isn't there an EU standard for
UIs? We have all sorts of gadgets that nobody can figure how to operate.


Urinary infections? I'm pretty sure a massive, bloated burocracy like the
EU would have specs for that and just about everything else as well.



--
This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via
the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other
protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of
GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet
protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.

bitrex
Guest

Thu Jan 03, 2019 4:45 am   



On 01/01/2019 12:09 PM, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 10:30:57 -0800 (PST), whit3rd <whit3rd_at_gmail.com
wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 8:21:05 PM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 03:14:19 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts
jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote:

Being usually right is not a remarkable skill.

It is in today's world.

Not at all. Most of my notebook pages never get red-line revision, because
they're fine the frst time.

frst time is fine?

'Usually right' is so commonplace, in fact,
that it's puzzling to hear someone getting something wrong; why
would that happen, you can (A) think it through, or (B) defer to an expert,
or (C) keep silence. It does take some broad knowledge to know
when to go with (B), though.

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.


Why would one think 'today's world' is full of errors? More likely, some
agressive stupidity or clickbait hype/ambiguity has come to your attention.

Economic crashes, epidemics, addiction, nations in poverty, hunger,
wars, and death have come to my attention.



There's an art to being "usually right." What you have to do is give two
contradictory opinions at different times.

Then if one of them turns out to be correct you just deny you ever said
the thing that wasn't.

It also helps if you can destroy the evidence you did, somehow, either
through burying it in a mass of other Schroedinger-prognostications and
random streams-of-consciousness, or, when you can get away with it,
outright deletion.


Guest

Thu Jan 03, 2019 5:45 am   



On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 5:49:10 AM UTC+11, Cursitor Doom wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 01 Jan 2019 20:39:23 -0800, John Larkin wrote:

Europeans love to make standards. Why isn't there an EU standard for
UIs? We have all sorts of gadgets that nobody can figure how to operate..

Urinary infections? I'm pretty sure a massive, bloated burocracy like the
EU would have specs for that and just about everything else as well.


User Interfaces. I suppose that Cursitor Doom is too totally hardware oriented to know about them. The example that came out of the paper I liked was the left-handed Marconi engineer who developed a signal generator that worked fine, but was hard for right-handed people to use, which is the kind of problem that Cursitor Doom might have been able to recognise - if he was right-handed, and if he thought hard enough about what he was doing to recognise the nature of the awkwardness.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

whit3rd
Guest

Sun Jan 06, 2019 11:45 am   



On Tuesday, January 1, 2019 at 9:09:57 AM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:

Quote:
The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.


As stated before, I don't understand why you think that. Name two fields,
and tell us who you consider 'experts', and why they're wrong.

Expert drivers, for instance, rarely get lost or go the wrong way on a one-way
street.

> >Why would one think 'today's world' is full of errors?

Economic crashes, epidemics, addiction, nations in poverty, hunger,
wars, and death have come to my attention.

Death is not an error, it is an eternal principle. Hunger is a sensation, poverty
is defined on a population distribution wealth curve, wars are criminal behavior
practiced by entities 'above the law'.... none of that has anything to do with
expertise. Economic crashes (and booms) are hyperbole for broad financial
swings.

Epidemics are the success of disease organisms, addiction is an excursion
into behavior instability... certainly those aren't experts' doing!

Logic is not so loose that the existence of death supports
a claim that 'experts are mostly <x>' where that 'x' can be any word you please.


Guest

Sun Jan 06, 2019 2:45 pm   



On Sunday, 6 January 2019 10:39:45 UTC, whit3rd wrote:
Quote:
On Tuesday, January 1, 2019 at 9:09:57 AM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.

As stated before, I don't understand why you think that. Name two fields,
and tell us who you consider 'experts', and why they're wrong.


psychology, climate change, perhaps politics

Quote:
Expert drivers, for instance, rarely get lost or go the wrong way on a one-way
street.

Why would one think 'today's world' is full of errors?

Economic crashes, epidemics, addiction, nations in poverty, hunger,
wars, and death have come to my attention.

Death is not an error, it is an eternal principle.


A huge number of deaths are caused by failure of expertise

Quote:
Hunger is a sensation, poverty
is defined on a population distribution wealth curve,


A billion people in poverty /hungry are partly down to political shortcomings

Quote:
wars are criminal behavior
practiced by entities 'above the law'....


by governments mostly

Quote:
none of that has anything to do with
expertise. Economic crashes (and booms) are hyperbole for broad financial
swings.

Epidemics are the success of disease organisms,


failure to prevent them is often a human failure

Quote:
addiction is an excursion
into behavior instability... certainly those aren't experts' doing!


failed treatment methods are


NT


Guest

Sun Jan 06, 2019 3:45 pm   



On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 12:00:17 AM UTC+11, tabb...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Sunday, 6 January 2019 10:39:45 UTC, whit3rd wrote:
On Tuesday, January 1, 2019 at 9:09:57 AM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.

As stated before, I don't understand why you think that. Name two fields,
and tell us who you consider 'experts', and why they're wrong.

psychology, climate change, perhaps politics


Or so NT thinks. From my point of view, he's complaining that recognised experts don't share his silly ideas.

On climate change in particular, the experts have got it right, and a whole lot of people don't like what the experts are telling them, which doesn't make the experts wrong, but rather reflects the unpalatability of the message.

Quote:
Expert drivers, for instance, rarely get lost or go the wrong way on a one-
way street.

Why would one think 'today's world' is full of errors?

Economic crashes, epidemics, addiction, nations in poverty, hunger,
wars, and death have come to my attention.

Death is not an error, it is an eternal principle.

A huge number of deaths are caused by failure of expertise.


That is one of NT's delusions. His silly idea wouldn't kill any more people than those that die in expert care, but the people would die earlier.

Quote:
Hunger is a sensation, poverty
is defined on a population distribution wealth curve,

A billion people in poverty /hunger is partly down to political shortcomings.


The best of politicians can't conjure up agricultural revolutions overnight..

Growing more food takes extra resources to train the people growing the food, better seed to make best use of the soil in the area, and usually fertiliser of one sort of another to make the soil more fertile.

Politicians who have had the sort of power to mobilise these resources by fiat have tended to stunt the agricultural production they were aiming to improve. Stalin and Mao come to mind.

Quote:
wars are criminal behavior
practiced by entities 'above the law'....

by governments mostly


Criminal governments are frequent. The fact that Dubbya never got prosecuted for declaring war on Irak doesn't make his government's action any less criminally irresponsible (not to mention totally stupid).

Quote:
none of that has anything to do with
expertise. Economic crashes (and booms) are hyperbole for broad financial
swings.

Epidemics are the success of disease organisms,

failure to prevent them is often a human failure.


But not usually by the experts, who know exactly what to do, but aren't allowed to shoot anti-vaccination campaigners, or even give them the diseases to which they are exposing the population.

We are having a small cluster of measles infections in Sydney

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/extremely-contagious-second-case-of-measles-in-sydney-20190102-p50pah.html

I had it as a kid, and it didn't kill me, but it did progress to pneumonia which did kill kids before antibiotics were around. Roald Dahl's daughter Olivia died of measles in 1962, more than ten years later - one of the roughly 100 kids who died of it in the UK every year until the measles vaccine was widely available.

Quote:
addiction is an excursion
into behavior instability... certainly those aren't experts' doing!

failed treatment methods are.


Criminalising drugs of addiction doesn't make life easier for the experts. "Harm reduction" works a lot better, but the religious right is addicted to human sacrifice.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

John Larkin
Guest

Sun Jan 06, 2019 5:45 pm   



On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 02:39:41 -0800 (PST), whit3rd <whit3rd_at_gmail.com>
wrote:

Quote:
On Tuesday, January 1, 2019 at 9:09:57 AM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.

As stated before, I don't understand why you think that. Name two fields,
and tell us who you consider 'experts', and why they're wrong.


Economics, Nobel Prize winners get everything wrong.

Nutrition, where the theories swig wildly.

Quote:

Expert drivers, for instance, rarely get lost or go the wrong way on a one-way
street.


Some people, like drivers and engineers, get fast feedback if we are
wrong, so we learn or find another job. Some areas of study have no
useful feedback and are dominated by academic group-think.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics


Guest

Sun Jan 06, 2019 7:45 pm   



On Sunday, 6 January 2019 14:03:45 UTC, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
Quote:
On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 12:00:17 AM UTC+11, tabby wrote:
On Sunday, 6 January 2019 10:39:45 UTC, whit3rd wrote:
On Tuesday, January 1, 2019 at 9:09:57 AM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.

As stated before, I don't understand why you think that. Name two fields,
and tell us who you consider 'experts', and why they're wrong.

psychology, climate change, perhaps politics

Or so NT thinks. From my point of view, he's complaining that recognised experts don't share his silly ideas.

On climate change in particular, the experts have got it right, and a whole lot of people don't like what the experts are telling them, which doesn't make the experts wrong, but rather reflects the unpalatability of the message.

Expert drivers, for instance, rarely get lost or go the wrong way on a one-
way street.

Why would one think 'today's world' is full of errors?

Economic crashes, epidemics, addiction, nations in poverty, hunger,
wars, and death have come to my attention.

Death is not an error, it is an eternal principle.

A huge number of deaths are caused by failure of expertise.

That is one of NT's delusions. His silly idea wouldn't kill any more people than those that die in expert care, but the people would die earlier.

Hunger is a sensation, poverty
is defined on a population distribution wealth curve,

A billion people in poverty /hunger is partly down to political shortcomings.

The best of politicians can't conjure up agricultural revolutions overnight.

Growing more food takes extra resources to train the people growing the food, better seed to make best use of the soil in the area, and usually fertiliser of one sort of another to make the soil more fertile.

Politicians who have had the sort of power to mobilise these resources by fiat have tended to stunt the agricultural production they were aiming to improve. Stalin and Mao come to mind.

wars are criminal behavior
practiced by entities 'above the law'....

by governments mostly

Criminal governments are frequent. The fact that Dubbya never got prosecuted for declaring war on Irak doesn't make his government's action any less criminally irresponsible (not to mention totally stupid).

none of that has anything to do with
expertise. Economic crashes (and booms) are hyperbole for broad financial
swings.

Epidemics are the success of disease organisms,

failure to prevent them is often a human failure.

But not usually by the experts, who know exactly what to do, but aren't allowed to shoot anti-vaccination campaigners, or even give them the diseases to which they are exposing the population.

We are having a small cluster of measles infections in Sydney

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/extremely-contagious-second-case-of-measles-in-sydney-20190102-p50pah.html

I had it as a kid, and it didn't kill me, but it did progress to pneumonia which did kill kids before antibiotics were around. Roald Dahl's daughter Olivia died of measles in 1962, more than ten years later - one of the roughly 100 kids who died of it in the UK every year until the measles vaccine was widely available.

addiction is an excursion
into behavior instability... certainly those aren't experts' doing!

failed treatment methods are.

Criminalising drugs of addiction doesn't make life easier for the experts.. "Harm reduction" works a lot better, but the religious right is addicted to human sacrifice.


So many whooshes, so pointless discussing anything with him.
Oh, he did get one point right:

Quote:
Epidemics are the success of disease organisms,

failure to prevent them is often a human failure.

But not usually by the experts, who know exactly what to do,


I don't think there was anything else.


NT


Guest

Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:45 am   



On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 5:21:58 AM UTC+11, tabb...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Sunday, 6 January 2019 14:03:45 UTC, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 12:00:17 AM UTC+11, tabby wrote:
On Sunday, 6 January 2019 10:39:45 UTC, whit3rd wrote:
On Tuesday, January 1, 2019 at 9:09:57 AM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:

The problem is that in many important fields, the experts are mostly
wrong.

As stated before, I don't understand why you think that. Name two fields,
and tell us who you consider 'experts', and why they're wrong.

psychology, climate change, perhaps politics

Or so NT thinks. From my point of view, he's complaining that recognised experts don't share his silly ideas.

On climate change in particular, the experts have got it right, and a whole lot of people don't like what the experts are telling them, which doesn't make the experts wrong, but rather reflects the unpalatability of the message.

Expert drivers, for instance, rarely get lost or go the wrong way on a one-
way street.

Why would one think 'today's world' is full of errors?

Economic crashes, epidemics, addiction, nations in poverty, hunger,
wars, and death have come to my attention.

Death is not an error, it is an eternal principle.

A huge number of deaths are caused by failure of expertise.

That is one of NT's delusions. His silly idea wouldn't kill any more people than those that die in expert care, but the people would die earlier.

Hunger is a sensation, poverty
is defined on a population distribution wealth curve,

A billion people in poverty /hunger is partly down to political shortcomings.

The best of politicians can't conjure up agricultural revolutions overnight.

Growing more food takes extra resources to train the people growing the food, better seed to make best use of the soil in the area, and usually fertiliser of one sort of another to make the soil more fertile.

Politicians who have had the sort of power to mobilise these resources by fiat have tended to stunt the agricultural production they were aiming to improve. Stalin and Mao come to mind.

wars are criminal behavior
practiced by entities 'above the law'....

by governments mostly

Criminal governments are frequent. The fact that Dubbya never got prosecuted for declaring war on Irak doesn't make his government's action any less criminally irresponsible (not to mention totally stupid).

none of that has anything to do with
expertise. Economic crashes (and booms) are hyperbole for broad financial
swings.

Epidemics are the success of disease organisms,

failure to prevent them is often a human failure.

But not usually by the experts, who know exactly what to do, but aren't allowed to shoot anti-vaccination campaigners, or even give them the diseases to which they are exposing the population.

We are having a small cluster of measles infections in Sydney

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/extremely-contagious-second-case-of-measles-in-sydney-20190102-p50pah.html

I had it as a kid, and it didn't kill me, but it did progress to pneumonia which did kill kids before antibiotics were around. Roald Dahl's daughter Olivia died of measles in 1962, more than ten years later - one of the roughly 100 kids who died of it in the UK every year until the measles vaccine was widely available.

addiction is an excursion
into behavior instability... certainly those aren't experts' doing!

failed treatment methods are.

Criminalising drugs of addiction doesn't make life easier for the experts. "Harm reduction" works a lot better, but the religious right is addicted to human sacrifice.


So many whooshes, so pointless discussing anything with him.


Right. NT doesn't discuss things with people who don't agree with him.
He can't marshal evidence that actually supports his points of view, and gets hurt when it is pointed out that he has missed the point.

Quote:
Oh, he did get one point right:

Epidemics are the success of disease organisms,

failure to prevent them is often a human failure.

But not usually by the experts, who know exactly what to do,


NT being what he is, there's a big snip there, which he hasn't marked.

> I don't think there was anything else.

NT isn't big on thinking. He has loads of opinions, but if he could think about what he claims he'd have a lot fewer silly opinions.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

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