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Bill Sloman
Guest

Sat May 02, 2020 8:45 am   



I used to connect my printer to my computer over an Ethernet link, but some months ago that stopped working. I replaced the Ethernet cable with a USB cable plugged into the printer's USB port and didn't think much about it.

But my wife's computer used to be linked up to our broad-band link (now fibre to the building) by an ethernet link over the mains wiring, and that stopped working a the much the same time. My lap-top (which I don't use very often) exploited the same link, and that stopped working too.

A google search threw up enough responses to make it clear that other people have had much the same problem. Microsoft has proposed some solutions that ought to work, but I've tried all of them and none of them do.

Has anybody run into the problem, and found a solution that works?

Our resident conspiracy theory nuts will invent a theory about Microsoft conspiring with the US spooks to force people onto WiFi links which are easier to snoop than Ethernet connections, but I'm happy to assume that Microsoft has just done something stupid.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Guest

Sat May 02, 2020 1:45 pm   



Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:d1598c4d-069a-4220-aa5c-0320942a17a7_at_googlegroups.com:

Quote:
But my wife's computer used to be linked up to our broad-band link
(now fibre to the building) by an ethernet link over the mains
wiring, and that stopped working a the much the same time. My
lap-top (which I don't use very often) exploited the same link,
and that stopped working too.


Now that the printer is not "a network device", and is directly
connected to a 'user PC', it is not longer visible from the net, you
need to "share it" as a device on the PC it is connected to.
That PC also has to be on and booted into Windows. I am not sure how
easy it is to share it from within a Linix session.

Bill Sloman
Guest

Sat May 02, 2020 2:45 pm   



On Saturday, May 2, 2020 at 10:34:22 PM UTC+10, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
Quote:
Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:d1598c4d-069a-4220-aa5c-0320942a17a7_at_googlegroups.com:

But my wife's computer used to be linked up to our broad-band link
(now fibre to the building) by an ethernet link over the mains
wiring, and that stopped working a the much the same time. My
lap-top (which I don't use very often) exploited the same link,
and that stopped working too.


Now that the printer is not "a network device", and is directly
connected to a 'user PC', it is not longer visible from the net, you
need to "share it" as a device on the PC it is connected to.


The printer was never shared. I just happened to have an Ethernet cable handy when it was delivered. There was never any esoteric problem with the link - it just stopped being accessible over that Ethernet cable.

Quote:
That PC also has to be on and booted into Windows. I am not sure how
easy it is to share it from within a Linux session.


I never bothered. My wife has her own printer in her study, and if she wants me to print something in colour she e-mails the document to me for me to print it.

I do have Linux on my computer- SuSE - but I haven't used it recently.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Michael Terrell
Guest

Sat May 02, 2020 4:45 pm   



On Saturday, May 2, 2020 at 3:40:07 AM UTC-4, Bill Sloman wrote:
Quote:
I used to connect my printer to my computer over an Ethernet link, but some months ago that stopped working. I replaced the Ethernet cable with a USB cable plugged into the printer's USB port and didn't think much about it.

But my wife's computer used to be linked up to our broad-band link (now fibre to the building) by an ethernet link over the mains wiring, and that stopped working a the much the same time. My lap-top (which I don't use very often) exploited the same link, and that stopped working too.

A google search threw up enough responses to make it clear that other people have had much the same problem. Microsoft has proposed some solutions that ought to work, but I've tried all of them and none of them do.

Has anybody run into the problem, and found a solution that works?

Our resident conspiracy theory nuts will invent a theory about Microsoft conspiring with the US spooks to force people onto WiFi links which are easier to snoop than Ethernet connections, but I'm happy to assume that Microsoft has just done something stupid.


I've had network LASER printers change their IP address after multiple power failures. Belarc Advisor is freeware hat not only inventories the hardware and installed software, it maps all of your network connections. If it doesn't find your printer, the Ethernet port on your router is bad, or the port on the printer has died. Unplug the USB cable before running Belarc Advisor, the printer's firmware will only recognize one port at a time. Power down the printer and restart it before testing, and after removing the USB cable.

If the IP address doesn't match the information for your printer, edit it to match the current address that your computer has assigned to it, to the new address.

Belarc Advisor will display the network name, or the IP address of everything it finds on your network. I have used it for over a decade to have a baseline on every computer that I repaired or built.


https://www.belarc.com/products_belarc_advisor

whit3rd
Guest

Sat May 02, 2020 7:45 pm   



On Saturday, May 2, 2020 at 12:40:07 AM UTC-7, Bill Sloman wrote:
Quote:
I used to connect my printer to my computer over an Ethernet link, but some months ago that stopped working. I replaced the Ethernet cable with a USB cable plugged into the printer's USB port and didn't think much about it.

But my wife's computer used to be linked up to our broad-band link (now fibre to the building) by an ethernet link over the mains wiring, and that stopped working a the much the same time.


Possibly you have a network switch or router, that has filled up a table; power-cycle (reboot)
any such devices, they will rebuild their tables. If that doesn't do it, maybe (like happened here)
it has a more pedestrian problem (flaky power brick?).

I have a network bridge that needs such power-cycling every few months. On my to-do list:
give it a switched power socket with an acessible ON/OFF toggle.


Guest

Sat May 02, 2020 8:45 pm   



Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:adb989e4-43d3-41c8-a294-f46f597ac5af_at_googlegroups.com:

Quote:
On Saturday, May 2, 2020 at 10:34:22 PM UTC+10,
DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:d1598c4d-069a-4220-aa5c-0320942a17a7_at_googlegroups.com:

But my wife's computer used to be linked up to our broad-band
link (now fibre to the building) by an ethernet link over the
mains wiring, and that stopped working a the much the same
time. My lap-top (which I don't use very often) exploited the
same link, and that stopped working too.


Now that the printer is not "a network device", and is directly
connected to a 'user PC', it is not longer visible from the net,
you need to "share it" as a device on the PC it is connected to.

The printer was never shared.


You missed the point. Now it has to be IF you want to hit it from
other 'terminal locations' on your network.

Quote:
I just happened to have an Ethernet
cable handy when it was delivered.


OK THAT made it a network printer, as in connected to a network and
access managed ON the printer itself and accessible by all other
elements on the network.

Quote:
There was never any esoteric
problem with the link - it just stopped being accessible over that
Ethernet cable.


You simply needed to look at your router's management setup and
'find it' again. OR replace the cable, but you think it was not a
hardware issue. If it was not hdw, then it is network, and that
router is managed via a PC or web page, but usually only for locally
connected terminals. If found, it should be able to be seen by any
netwrok user. So IF the router DOES have it setup, the error is on
the network setup of the device trying to access it, otherwise it IS
hardware based.

However, you said you began to connect to it from your PC where you
have plugged it in VIA USB port on that PC.

THIS is the point in which it DOES require that you set it up a
shared devcie since it is now a device on your machine, and your
machine is secure from others accessing it unless you say they can.

So again... YES, you DO need to share it in the USB attached
configuration.

Quote:
That PC also has to be on and booted into Windows. I am not sure
how easy it is to share it from within a Linux session.

I never bothered. My wife has her own printer in her study,


Yet you come here pissing and moaning that it is her computer that
van now no longer access it, yet do not have the common sense to
understand the difference between a network atached printer, which is
seen by all on the network, and a NON-network attached, locally
attached printer ona a machine which you just acknowledged is not a
sharing machine... yet.

Did the light bulb turn on yet?

Quote:
and
if she wants me to print something in colour she e-mails the
document to me for me to print it.


Again, why the whimper then?
Quote:

I do have Linux on my computer- SuSE - but I haven't used it
recently.

I realize now that I should have left that not really relavent
comment out of the assistance.

The fact remains that a locally attached peripheral is rarely ever
an also usable device by other elements on a network. Both that
machine's OS and the device have to be configured to accept shared
access. It makes your machine a print server.

All basic stuff.

Bill Sloman
Guest

Sun May 03, 2020 3:45 am   



On Sunday, May 3, 2020 at 4:58:47 AM UTC+10, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
Quote:
Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:adb989e4-43d3-41c8-a294-f46f597ac5af_at_googlegroups.com:

On Saturday, May 2, 2020 at 10:34:22 PM UTC+10,
DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:d1598c4d-069a-4220-aa5c-0320942a17a7_at_googlegroups.com:

But my wife's computer used to be linked up to our broad-band
link (now fibre to the building) by an ethernet link over the
mains wiring, and that stopped working a the much the same
time. My lap-top (which I don't use very often) exploited the
same link, and that stopped working too.


Now that the printer is not "a network device", and is directly
connected to a 'user PC', it is not longer visible from the net,
you need to "share it" as a device on the PC it is connected to.

The printer was never shared.

You missed the point. Now it has to be IF you want to hit it from
other 'terminal locations' on your network.

I just happened to have an Ethernet
cable handy when it was delivered.

OK THAT made it a network printer, as in connected to a network and
access managed ON the printer itself and accessible by all other
elements on the network.

There was never any esoteric
problem with the link - it just stopped being accessible over that
Ethernet cable.

You simply needed to look at your router's management setup and
'find it' again. OR replace the cable, but you think it was not a
hardware issue. If it was not hdw, then it is network, and that
router is managed via a PC or web page, but usually only for locally
connected terminals. If found, it should be able to be seen by any
network user. So IF the router DOES have it setup, the error is on
the network setup of the device trying to access it, otherwise it IS
hardware based.

However, you said you began to connect to it from your PC where you
have plugged it in VIA USB port on that PC.

THIS is the point in which it DOES require that you set it up a
shared devcie since it is now a device on your machine, and your
machine is secure from others accessing it unless you say they can.

So again... YES, you DO need to share it in the USB attached
configuration.


I don't. It was never shared.

Quote:
That PC also has to be on and booted into Windows. I am not sure
how easy it is to share it from within a Linux session.

I never bothered. My wife has her own printer in her study,

Yet you come here pissing and moaning that it is her computer that
can now no longer access it, yet do not have the common sense to
understand the difference between a network attached printer, which is
seen by all on the network, and a NON-network attached, locally
attached printer ona a machine which you just acknowledged is not a
sharing machine... yet.


You got that wrong. The point was never her access to the printer. The point was that I had set up a local area connection to our broad-band modem, from her computer and my laptop, and both and worked for years, but bot stopped working recently, and the computers dropped back to using the less satisfactory WiFi link.

The fact that my Ethernet link to my printer stopped working at much the same time struck me as indicating a Microsoft generated problem.

> Did the light bulb turn on yet?

Yours clearly hasn't.

Quote:
and if she wants me to print something in colour she e-mails the
document to me for me to print it.

Again, why the whimper then?


Because we are stuck with using the WiFi link to access the internet, and we can see up to a dozen other WiFi links from adjacent flats (at the right time of day) and they all interfere with our WiFi link.

Quote:
I do have Linux on my computer- SuSE - but I haven't used it
recently.

I realize now that I should have left that not really relevant
comment out of the assistance.

The fact remains that a locally attached peripheral is rarely ever
an also usable device by other elements on a network. Both that
machine's OS and the device have to be configured to accept shared
access. It makes your machine a print server.

All basic stuff.


Sure. And my wife's computer belongs to her employer and is configured by their computer manager. When I tried to include my lap top in our homegroup I got told to ask her for the password - which she doesn't know, and didn't even know existed. This seems to matter for the local area network link, but not for the WiFi link, which is a bit silly.

Windows network mapping on the WiFi link shows up everything (including the router modem), but it doesn't work on the local area connection.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Bill Sloman
Guest

Sun May 03, 2020 4:45 am   



On Sunday, May 3, 2020 at 1:30:01 PM UTC+10, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
Quote:
Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:d1598c4d-069a-4220-aa5c-0320942a17a7_at_googlegroups.com:

I used to connect my printer to my computer over an Ethernet link,
but some months ago that stopped working. I replaced the Ethernet
cable with a USB cable plugged into the printer's USB port and
didn't think much about it.

But my wife's computer used to be linked up to our broad-band link
(now fibre to the building) by an ethernet link over the mains
wiring, and that stopped working a the much the same time. My
lap-top (which I don't use very often) exploited the same link,
and that stopped working too.

A google search threw up enough responses to make it clear that
other people have had much the same problem. Microsoft has
proposed some solutions that ought to work, but I've tried all of
them and none of them do.

Has anybody run into the problem, and found a solution that works?

Our resident conspiracy theory nuts will invent a theory about
Microsoft conspiring with the US spooks to force people onto WiFi
links which are easier to snoop than Ethernet connections, but I'm
happy to assume that Microsoft has just done something stupid.


In my first response, I only read a bit in and was responding to
you regarding the first device you mentioned.

Had I read further, I would have told you it was your router, which
I assure you it is.

You then went on to spout some shit about Microsoft, but it has
nothing to do with MS either.

MS has nothing to do with a network attached and accessed printer,
when it is also coupled with other 'clients' on the network having
access problems then it is not a Windows or MS problem.


The local area links worked fine for years. Nothing has changed in the systems involved except the regular Windows up-dates.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Guest

Sun May 03, 2020 4:45 am   



Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:d1598c4d-069a-4220-aa5c-0320942a17a7_at_googlegroups.com:

Quote:
I used to connect my printer to my computer over an Ethernet link,
but some months ago that stopped working. I replaced the Ethernet
cable with a USB cable plugged into the printer's USB port and
didn't think much about it.

But my wife's computer used to be linked up to our broad-band link
(now fibre to the building) by an ethernet link over the mains
wiring, and that stopped working a the much the same time. My
lap-top (which I don't use very often) exploited the same link,
and that stopped working too.

A google search threw up enough responses to make it clear that
other people have had much the same problem. Microsoft has
proposed some solutions that ought to work, but I've tried all of
them and none of them do.

Has anybody run into the problem, and found a solution that works?

Our resident conspiracy theory nuts will invent a theory about
Microsoft conspiring with the US spooks to force people onto WiFi
links which are easier to snoop than Ethernet connections, but I'm
happy to assume that Microsoft has just done something stupid.


In my first response, I only read a bit in and was responding to
you regarding the first device you mentioned.

Had I read further, I would have told you it was your router, which
I assure you it is.

You then went on to spout some shit about Microsoft, but it has
nothing to do with MS either.

MS has nothing to do with a network attached and accessed printer,
when it is also coupled with other 'clients' on the network having
access problems then it is not a Windows or MS problem.


Guest

Sun May 03, 2020 4:45 am   



Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:7f362070-b94a-41f6-b8e6-6d4044c0285d_at_googlegroups.com:

Quote:
The fact that my Ethernet link to my printer stopped working at
much the same time struck me as indicating a Microsoft generated
problem.


Seriously flawed logic. Both of your machines are not both updated
to the same version of Windows. And I am talking about update level.
not sales versioning.

It isn't MS.

Your broadband provider reset your modem's router or it latched up
and YOU need to reset it. Either way, a power cycle should do it.

You provide no logic path to claim that it is MS based problem.
If you knew how to access your BB modem's router FROM your PC, as in
it's management page, then you would be able to see all clients
attached to it and by which manner. IF you get that access, and your
device is the only one there then the modem's router needs resetting
or reconfiguration or is broken.

But it is not the OS of two different machines and a printer
failing all at the same time.

mpm
Guest

Sun May 03, 2020 4:45 am   



On Saturday, May 2, 2020 at 3:40:07 AM UTC-4, Bill Sloman wrote:
I don't know if it's related, but I've had problems with my NAS server when the ISP provider changes out the modem.

Did the problem start with the "fiber to the building" transition, or do you think they're unrelated?

Otherwise, all I can offer is that we have an HP All-in-one printer that (for whatever reason) likes to change its fixed IP address from time to time. It often requires wireless-only end users to remove and reinstall the printer from the network. Very frustrating.

On the LAN side, we can lock that printer down by MAC address, and so it doesn't suffer the same problems from those who have a wired-LAN connection to our network.


Guest

Sun May 03, 2020 5:45 am   



Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:7f362070-b94a-41f6-b8e6-6d4044c0285d_at_googlegroups.com:

Quote:
Because we are stuck with using the WiFi link to access the
internet, and we can see up to a dozen other WiFi links from
adjacent flats (at the right time of day) and they all interfere
with our WiFi link.


Ummm... No, they do not. That is the point. They have their
channels and you have yours. IF your wifi device is not configured
to access your bb modem's wifi router correctly, you will have
problems, because being the closest one to you, it should be the one
you have the easiest time finding on a power sorted list, which they
all are. Like right at the top of the list.

IOW, you lie.

And ALL BB Modems use wifi levels that are secure so don't even go
there either. And most have 5GHz channels too.

U B FOOL Of SHITE OLD MAN. College folks have no problems with
phones, PCs game consoles, IOT devices... All have no problems
hooking up multiple devices where there are literally hundreds "in
adjacent flats". A dozen ain't shit. And NO they do NOT
'interfere'. You have been out of electronics way too long.

But Billy wants to cry. I was trying to help you, but you are
starting to show a bit of TrumpLikeŠ stupidity again.

Reset your router for the hard wired devices and go to wifi for the
rest and stop acting like it doesn't work.

Bill Sloman
Guest

Sun May 03, 2020 5:45 am   



On Sunday, May 3, 2020 at 1:45:34 PM UTC+10, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
Quote:
Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:7f362070-b94a-41f6-b8e6-6d4044c0285d_at_googlegroups.com:

Because we are stuck with using the WiFi link to access the
internet, and we can see up to a dozen other WiFi links from
adjacent flats (at the right time of day) and they all interfere
with our WiFi link.


Ummm... No, they do not. That is the point. They have their
channels and you have yours. IF your wifi device is not configured
to access your bb modem's wifi router correctly, you will have
problems, because being the closest one to you, it should be the one
you have the easiest time finding on a power sorted list, which they
all are. Like right at the top of the list.


Of course it is. But all the WiFi links are transmitting power on much the same frequencies, and this acts as background noise on our particular link. The signal to noise ratio gets degraded, and the error rate goes up.

> IOW, you lie.

Actually you don't understand enough about how WiFi works to appreciate what I was saying. That doesn't make me a liar.

Quote:
And ALL BB Modems use wifi levels that are secure so don't even go
there either. And most have 5GHz channels too.


What's secure about radiating a signal in all directions.?

> U B FOOL Of SHITE OLD MAN.

The shit being spread here is all yours.

Quote:
College folks have no problems with
phones, PCs game consoles, IOT devices... All have no problems
hooking up multiple devices where there are literally hundreds "in
adjacent flats".


That isn't the problem. The problem is the performance of each link in a dirty RF environment.

Quote:
A dozen ain't shit. And NO they do NOT
'interfere'. You have been out of electronics way too long.


It looks more as if you never got far enough into it.

<snipped the obvious suggestion>

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Bill Sloman
Guest

Sun May 03, 2020 5:45 am   



On Sunday, May 3, 2020 at 1:51:14 PM UTC+10, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
Quote:
Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:ed3d103b-251a-4a69-9273-2c22e65e357d_at_googlegroups.com:

On Sunday, May 3, 2020 at 1:30:01 PM UTC+10,
DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:d1598c4d-069a-4220-aa5c-0320942a17a7_at_googlegroups.com:

I used to connect my printer to my computer over an Ethernet
link, but some months ago that stopped working. I replaced the
Ethernet cable with a USB cable plugged into the printer's USB
port and didn't think much about it.

But my wife's computer used to be linked up to our broad-band
link (now fibre to the building) by an ethernet link over the
mains wiring, and that stopped working a the much the same
time. My lap-top (which I don't use very often) exploited the
same link, and that stopped working too.

A google search threw up enough responses to make it clear that
other people have had much the same problem. Microsoft has
proposed some solutions that ought to work, but I've tried all
of them and none of them do.

Has anybody run into the problem, and found a solution that
works?

Our resident conspiracy theory nuts will invent a theory about
Microsoft conspiring with the US spooks to force people onto
WiFi links which are easier to snoop than Ethernet connections,
but I'm happy to assume that Microsoft has just done something
stupid.


In my first response, I only read a bit in and was responding
to
you regarding the first device you mentioned.

Had I read further, I would have told you it was your router,
which
I assure you it is.

You then went on to spout some shit about Microsoft, but it has
nothing to do with MS either.

MS has nothing to do with a network attached and accessed
printer,
when it is also coupled with other 'clients' on the network
having access problems then it is not a Windows or MS problem.

The local area links worked fine for years. Nothing has changed in
the systems involved except the regular Windows up-dates.

If her system is managed by her employers IT guys then it is NOT getting
ANY MS updates until he puts them in.


She was complaining about the way here computer was slow to start on Thursday mornings, just as I was. The IT guys aren't going micromanage to that extent.
Quote:

And yours will not update "offered" updates. If you are on Windows
10 there are "feature" updates which must be chosen and accepted to
be put in. So you have no clue what "update state" the two machines
are in unless you go to their respective info dialogs and look.


I'm not on Windows 10. I have blocked up-dates to Windows 7 on my lap-top from time to time when I was using it away from home in places where getting large chunks of data was expensive, but I turn them back on again when I get home.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Guest

Sun May 03, 2020 5:45 am   



Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:ed3d103b-251a-4a69-9273-2c22e65e357d_at_googlegroups.com:

Quote:
On Sunday, May 3, 2020 at 1:30:01 PM UTC+10,
DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
Bill Sloman <bill.sloman_at_ieee.org> wrote in
news:d1598c4d-069a-4220-aa5c-0320942a17a7_at_googlegroups.com:

I used to connect my printer to my computer over an Ethernet
link, but some months ago that stopped working. I replaced the
Ethernet cable with a USB cable plugged into the printer's USB
port and didn't think much about it.

But my wife's computer used to be linked up to our broad-band
link (now fibre to the building) by an ethernet link over the
mains wiring, and that stopped working a the much the same
time. My lap-top (which I don't use very often) exploited the
same link, and that stopped working too.

A google search threw up enough responses to make it clear that
other people have had much the same problem. Microsoft has
proposed some solutions that ought to work, but I've tried all
of them and none of them do.

Has anybody run into the problem, and found a solution that
works?

Our resident conspiracy theory nuts will invent a theory about
Microsoft conspiring with the US spooks to force people onto
WiFi links which are easier to snoop than Ethernet connections,
but I'm happy to assume that Microsoft has just done something
stupid.


In my first response, I only read a bit in and was responding
to
you regarding the first device you mentioned.

Had I read further, I would have told you it was your router,
which
I assure you it is.

You then went on to spout some shit about Microsoft, but it has
nothing to do with MS either.

MS has nothing to do with a network attached and accessed
printer,
when it is also coupled with other 'clients' on the network
having access problems then it is not a Windows or MS problem.

The local area links worked fine for years. Nothing has changed in
the systems involved except the regular Windows up-dates.


If her system is managed by her emp IT guy then it is NOT getting
ANY MS updates until he puts them in.

And yours will not update "offered" updates. If you are on Windows
10 there are "feature" updates which must be chosen and accepted to
be put in. So you have no clue what "update state" the two machines
are in unless you go to their respective info dialogs and look.

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