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Joerg
Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 3:39 pm   



bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 8:21:00 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

Doing the recesses one day and the rest the next day is fine, as
long as

the Duration exterior paint can be rolled.


When you're cutting in the recesses on the first day, you need to
feather it off like the finished job. When you get the inevitable
drops on the flats below, you need to feather them out, same thing
with any excess squeezed out next to the recesses, because those
drops and ridges will be there to stay when it dries, and your second
coat on the flats is not going to dissolve them Smile


Good point. Got to do a clean job in that first step. And I don't want
to be sanding down ridges.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Joerg
Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 3:42 pm   



Martin Riddle wrote:
Quote:
"Joerg" <invalid_at_invalid.invalid> wrote in message
news:ar96bkF3uqsU1_at_mid.individual.net...
Hi Folks,

Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a lot.
Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back then.
First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now
some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense sun.

Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and
Benjamin
Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly Moore
would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best. I
think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer sun.
Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.

Any opinions? What say thee?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

For Latex, Glidden Endurance
http://www.glidden.com/products/endurance-exterior-paint-flat.do

I painted our eves with this and found out that the big box stores don't
carry it. You have to find a Glidden retailer, usually a little hardware
store that is approved by Glidden to sell it. I found out it is a
popular paint used for the houses along the water front, it weathers
very well.


Do you know how that holds up in the blistering sun? Weather isn't a
concern here but heat and UV is.


Quote:
Also get a semi gloss, there are more Akyds in the gloss versions which
make for a harder surface that will be more weather resistant. You can
always do a final coat in satin to cover the shine, wooden floors are
sometimes done this way.


So far we've always used semi-gloss. It also washes better. Occasionally
we have those turkey vultures and other birds who seem to have no qualms
about "letting go" during final approach. Pretty gross.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Charlie E.
Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 5:31 pm   



On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 17:14:59 -0700 (PDT),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

Quote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:48:30 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:



I haven't either. Meantime I've scoped out S-W Duration a bit and there

seem to be some issues with it, mostly because of its thickness and

quick drying time:



http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/10/duration-exterior.html



We normally use a roller but this paint doesn't seem to like that

technique. Our siding has these typical vertical recesses that must be

painted by brush and then the other person rolls the surfaces. Afraid

that S-W Duration might be clumping a lot when the roller meets the

brush-painted areas.



--

Regards, Joerg



http://www.analogconsultants.com/

I don't trust that review. I've used their interior Superpaint which had the same complaints, it's not that thick and it's easy to apply, but it does set up fast, so you don't want to go over anything that's been in place for more than a few minutes, you need to let it completely dry first. Your siding just means you cut-in all the recessed grooves on the first day and hit the flats on the second.

Or, just use a sprayer. We bought one a few years back, and makes a
lot of jobs a lot easier, just noisier!

Charlie

Joerg
Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 5:35 pm   



Charlie E. wrote:
Quote:
On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 17:14:59 -0700 (PDT),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:48:30 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:


I haven't either. Meantime I've scoped out S-W Duration a bit and there

seem to be some issues with it, mostly because of its thickness and

quick drying time:



http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/10/duration-exterior.html



We normally use a roller but this paint doesn't seem to like that

technique. Our siding has these typical vertical recesses that must be

painted by brush and then the other person rolls the surfaces. Afraid

that S-W Duration might be clumping a lot when the roller meets the

brush-painted areas.



--

Regards, Joerg



http://www.analogconsultants.com/
I don't trust that review. I've used their interior Superpaint which had the same complaints, it's not that thick and it's easy to apply, but it does set up fast, so you don't want to go over anything that's been in place for more than a few minutes, you need to let it completely dry first. Your siding just means you cut-in all the recessed grooves on the first day and hit the flats on the second.

Or, just use a sprayer. We bought one a few years back, and makes a
lot of jobs a lot easier, just noisier!


I tried with a li'l Wagner 15 year ago. What a mess. The results were
good but with thicker paint it plugged up a lot. Plus all the masking
and taping makes that job not so much faster than rolling. And if a
major wind comes up you have to stop so that no spray wafts over to the
neighbors.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Robert Macy
Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 6:27 pm   



On Mar 24, 1:34 pm, Joerg <inva...@invalid.invalid> wrote:
Quote:
Hi Folks,

Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a lot.
Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back then.
First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now
some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense sun.

Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and Benjamin
Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly Moore
would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best. I
think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer sun.
Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.

Any opinions? What say thee?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

you should post this question on
alt.home.repair usenet group

I did. The best, most knowledgeable answer came from 'nestork' who
really knew his chemistry, background etc.

I opted to use Behr from HD, simply due to availablility. Their
masonry and ?? paint is what someone else recommended. After one year
in the blazing Arizona sun and cold driving rains, haven't noticed any
shift in color. Nor, chalkiness I'm used to seeing.

One note, if you're near an airport; be prepared for that chalky look
coming on fast. I've heard that from planes dumping fuel on approach
really takes out your paint. From experience living near a major
airport, seemed true. Every house had chalky paint and even ours after
a coat of EXPENSIVE high quality started going the same way.

Joerg
Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 7:12 pm   



bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Monday, March 25, 2013 10:37:53 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 8:21:00 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:48:30 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
[...]
Sherwin-Williams always works as advertized and it's
priced slightly less than Benjamin Moore. They always
sell it for less than the list price, will probably
let that $55/gal Duration go for $35. I've seen the
Behr self-priming in action and am less than
impressed with it, you will end up using twice as
much and it still looks bad. Actually wouldn't trust
any claims of self-priming and prime it anyway
whichever paint you use, depends on your
standards.I'm pretty sure S-W is the product of
choice of the big contractors, they have every
imaginable application of paint covered.
We won't need to prime since there is already paint on
the house. It's not peeling or anything, just
sun-bleached. Our paint store doesn't give discounts
but that's ok, I am more concerned that it's good stuff
so it lasts maybe a bit longer than the 14 years the
Kelly Moore lasted. Meantime, the paints my wife found
rated as good: Pittsburgh Manor Hall Timeless
Pittsburgh Sunproof Latex Exterior Benjamin Moor Aura
Waterborne Exterior But maybe S-W is the way to go and
some web links corroborate what you said:
http://www.consumersearch.com/exterior-paint/sherwin-williams-duration
The only thing I don't like is that it's a self-prime
thick paint. We don't need to prime. -- Regards, Joerg
http://www.analogconsultants.com/
The Pittsburgh products look good, but I never see them
come up in reviews.
I haven't either. Meantime I've scoped out S-W Duration a
bit and there seem to be some issues with it, mostly
because of its thickness and quick drying time:
http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/10/duration-exterior.html
We normally use a roller but this paint doesn't seem to
like that technique. Our siding has these typical vertical
recesses that must be painted by brush and then the other
person rolls the surfaces. Afraid that S-W Duration might
be clumping a lot when the roller meets the brush-painted
areas. -- Regards, Joerg http://www.analogconsultants.com/
I don't trust that review. I've used their interior
Superpaint which had the same complaints, it's not that thick
and it's easy to apply, but it does set up fast, so you don't
want to go over anything that's been in place for more than a
few minutes, you need to let it completely dry first. Your
siding just means you cut-in all the recessed grooves on the
first day and hit the flats on the second.
It's not the only review like that I saw. But for the
Pittsburgh Sunproof I can't find any such detailed reviews.
Doing the recesses one day and the rest the next day is fine,
as long as the Duration exterior paint can be rolled.
LOL- those people are exaggerating about it being like
mayonnaise.




Well, most are folks who professionally paint since decades. They
must

know a thing or two.





You need to ask yourself how a leading paint manufacturer would
make a paint that's tough to roll? The answer is they don't, if
it's anything like the Superpaint, it will roll well. As for the
prep, you need to get some of those little blocks of 60-grit
sanders, they look like sponges, to dull and roughen the surface
of the existing paint, it takes only slightly more effort than
wiping the walls down with a rag. Check the S-W site about
surface prep, if it's hard and smooth the adhesion will not be
the best.




Yep, got those pads in the garage already.


Another factoid from S-W, and why Duration would be a good choice: If
you need to paint outside with latex paint when temperatures are
moving up and down like a yo-yo, I suggest you use one of the latex
like Duration, Resilience, or SuperPaint. These products can be
applied and will cure at lower temperatures, as low as 35° F.


Well, I am not going to paint when it's just a few degrees above
freezing :-)


Quote:
Traditional latex-based paints need temperatures above 60° F to cure
properly. Warmer temperatures are needed to allow the latex particles
to coalesce, or melt together. That is why the spring and fall can be
tricky times to paint outside. A common mistake is to paint when the
daytime high temperature gets above 60° F and the nighttime
temperatures get much cooler because dew forms on almost everything
as soon as the sun goes down. Even though the temperature was OK at
the time of application, the paint can stop coalescing. This permits
moisture to get into the uncured paint film allowing certain
ingredients to come to the surface when the moisture evaporates,
causing surface staining and possible adhesion problems.


BT. When we painted 14 years ago I worked long hours, usually came home
at 7:30pm or so. My wife isn't comfortable on high ladders so I did the
gables and such. One night was really cold, condensation, drip, drip
drip. Took me weeks to get those spots cleaned up, the paint clung to
the driveway like glue.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Joerg
Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 7:18 pm   



Robert Macy wrote:
Quote:
On Mar 24, 1:34 pm, Joerg <inva...@invalid.invalid> wrote:
Hi Folks,

Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a lot.
Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back then.
First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now
some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense sun.

Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and Benjamin
Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly Moore
would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best. I
think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer sun.
Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.

Any opinions? What say thee?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

you should post this question on
alt.home.repair usenet group

I did. The best, most knowledgeable answer came from 'nestork' who
really knew his chemistry, background etc.


Maybe I should have. I thought that group was almost dead by now.


Quote:
I opted to use Behr from HD, simply due to availablility. Their
masonry and ?? paint is what someone else recommended. After one year
in the blazing Arizona sun and cold driving rains, haven't noticed any
shift in color. Nor, chalkiness I'm used to seeing.


Well, one year isn't much time. All paint looks like new after that
short time. The discoloration began last year, meaning after 13 years
total. Almost like a digital change .. whambam .. beige -> white. And
only some spots.


Quote:
One note, if you're near an airport; be prepared for that chalky look
coming on fast. I've heard that from planes dumping fuel on approach
really takes out your paint. From experience living near a major
airport, seemed true. Every house had chalky paint and even ours after
a coat of EXPENSIVE high quality started going the same way.


We have a local runway right in town, it's sort of an airpark town.
Occasionally people find motor oil splotches on their homes. But we are
also in the approach path for Mather Field where freighters land. They
usually do not dump, so far no problems. There is some pollution though
because when we get the first rain after several dry months there's some
foam in the water from the downspouts.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 7:21 pm   



On Monday, March 25, 2013 10:37:53 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Quote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 8:21:00 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:



On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:48:30 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:20:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

[...]

Sherwin-Williams always works as advertized and it's

priced slightly less than Benjamin Moore. They always

sell it for less than the list price, will probably let

that $55/gal Duration go for $35. I've seen the Behr

self-priming in action and am less than impressed with

it, you will end up using twice as much and it still

looks bad. Actually wouldn't trust any claims of

self-priming and prime it anyway whichever paint you use,

depends on your standards.I'm pretty sure S-W is the

product of choice of the big contractors, they have every

imaginable application of paint covered.

We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the

house. It's not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached. Our

paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am

more concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit

longer than the 14 years the Kelly Moore lasted. Meantime,

the paints my wife found rated as good: Pittsburgh Manor

Hall Timeless Pittsburgh Sunproof Latex Exterior Benjamin

Moor Aura Waterborne Exterior But maybe S-W is the way to

go and some web links corroborate what you said:

http://www.consumersearch.com/exterior-paint/sherwin-williams-duration

The only thing I don't like is that it's a self-prime

thick paint. We don't need to prime. -- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

The Pittsburgh products look good, but I never see them come

up in reviews.

I haven't either. Meantime I've scoped out S-W Duration a bit

and there seem to be some issues with it, mostly because of its

thickness and quick drying time:

http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/10/duration-exterior.html We

normally use a roller but this paint doesn't seem to like that

technique. Our siding has these typical vertical recesses that

must be painted by brush and then the other person rolls the

surfaces. Afraid that S-W Duration might be clumping a lot when

the roller meets the brush-painted areas. -- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

I don't trust that review. I've used their interior Superpaint

which had the same complaints, it's not that thick and it's easy

to apply, but it does set up fast, so you don't want to go over

anything that's been in place for more than a few minutes, you

need to let it completely dry first. Your siding just means you

cut-in all the recessed grooves on the first day and hit the

flats on the second.









It's not the only review like that I saw. But for the Pittsburgh



Sunproof I can't find any such detailed reviews.







Doing the recesses one day and the rest the next day is fine, as

long as



the Duration exterior paint can be rolled.



LOL- those people are exaggerating about it being like mayonnaise.





Well, most are folks who professionally paint since decades. They must

know a thing or two.





You need to ask yourself how a leading paint manufacturer would make

a paint that's tough to roll? The answer is they don't, if it's

anything like the Superpaint, it will roll well. As for the prep, you

need to get some of those little blocks of 60-grit sanders, they look

like sponges, to dull and roughen the surface of the existing paint,

it takes only slightly more effort than wiping the walls down with a

rag. Check the S-W site about surface prep, if it's hard and smooth

the adhesion will not be the best.





Yep, got those pads in the garage already.


Another factoid from S-W, and why Duration would be a good choice:
If you need to paint outside with latex paint when temperatures are moving up and down like a yo-yo, I suggest you use one of the latex like Duration, Resilience, or SuperPaint. These products can be applied and will cure at lower temperatures, as low as 35° F. Traditional latex-based paints need temperatures above 60° F to cure properly. Warmer temperatures are needed to allow the latex particles to coalesce, or melt together. That is why the spring and fall can be tricky times to paint outside. A common mistake is to paint when the daytime high temperature gets above 60° F and the nighttime temperatures get much cooler because dew forms on almost everything as soon as the sun goes down. Even though the temperature was OK at the time of application, the paint can stop coalescing. This permits moisture to get into the uncured paint film allowing certain ingredients to come to the surface when the moisture evaporates, causing surface staining and possible adhesion problems.

Nico Coesel
Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 8:50 pm   



Joerg <invalid_at_invalid.invalid> wrote:

Quote:
Nico Coesel wrote:
Joerg <invalid_at_invalid.invalid> wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 5:03:41 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
imaginable application of paint covered.

We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the house. It's
not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached.

I'd still give it a very thourough sanding to remove the layer that
got affected by the sun.


That would take many weeks. The previous paint is very tough to get off.
We'll pressure-wash it though.

You don't have to take everything off. Just a thin layer. An even
surface also gives a much prettyer end result. OTOH a belt sander does
miracles on thick layers of paint.

Quote:
Our paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more
concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer than the
14 years the Kelly Moore lasted.

14 years is very long. Over here the recommendation is to paint every
8 years if you use very good paint.


In Germany houses weren't painted that often and that's only a few
hundred km from you. Maybe after 20 years or so. But over there I knew
what the good stuff was, paints such as ICI Dulux.

Well you can always skip a few years but you'll get rotten wood if you
wait to long.

--
Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
indicates you are not using the right tools...
nico_at_nctdevpuntnl (punt=.)
--------------------------------------------------------------

langwadt@fonz.dk
Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:01 pm   



On Mar 25, 8:50 pm, n...@puntnl.niks (Nico Coesel) wrote:
Quote:
Joerg <inva...@invalid.invalid> wrote:
Nico Coesel wrote:
Joerg <inva...@invalid.invalid> wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.f...@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 5:03:41 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.f...@gmail.com wrote:
imaginable application of paint covered.

We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the house. It's
not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached.

I'd still give it a very thourough sanding to remove the layer that
got affected by the sun.

That would take many weeks. The previous paint is very tough to get off.
We'll pressure-wash it though.

You don't have to take everything off. Just a thin layer. An even
surface also gives a much prettyer end result. OTOH a belt sander does
miracles on thick layers of paint.

Our paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more
concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer than the
14 years the Kelly Moore lasted.

14 years is very long. Over here the recommendation is to paint every
8 years if you use very good paint.

In Germany houses weren't painted that often and that's only a few
hundred km from you. Maybe after 20 years or so. But over there I knew
what the good stuff was, paints such as ICI Dulux.

Well you can always skip a few years but you'll get rotten wood if you
wait to long.


I believe it was in Sweden where they tried building a whole bunch of
identical
barracks but only painted half of them.

Turned out to be no significant difference when the construction was
done
right


-Lasse

Martin Riddle
Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 11:23 pm   



"Joerg" <invalid_at_invalid.invalid> wrote in message
news:arb62cFgvvuU4_at_mid.individual.net...
Quote:
Martin Riddle wrote:
"Joerg" <invalid_at_invalid.invalid> wrote in message
news:ar96bkF3uqsU1_at_mid.individual.net...
Hi Folks,

Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a
lot.
Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back
then.
First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now
some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense
sun.

Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and
Benjamin
Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly
Moore
would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best.
I
think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer
sun.
Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.

Any opinions? What say thee?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

For Latex, Glidden Endurance
http://www.glidden.com/products/endurance-exterior-paint-flat.do

I painted our eves with this and found out that the big box stores
don't
carry it. You have to find a Glidden retailer, usually a little
hardware
store that is approved by Glidden to sell it. I found out it is a
popular paint used for the houses along the water front, it weathers
very well.


Do you know how that holds up in the blistering sun? Weather isn't a
concern here but heat and UV is.


Also get a semi gloss, there are more Akyds in the gloss versions
which
make for a harder surface that will be more weather resistant. You
can
always do a final coat in satin to cover the shine, wooden floors
are
sometimes done this way.


So far we've always used semi-gloss. It also washes better.
Occasionally
we have those turkey vultures and other birds who seem to have no
qualms
about "letting go" during final approach. Pretty gross.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

It works in NY weather. I couldn’t say what the surface temps would be
in 98 degree weather along the shore. But it is perfered, and it does
seem to old up very well. Its not cheap either, I think it was $35/gal.

Cheers

John Larkin
Guest

Mon Mar 25, 2013 11:46 pm   



On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 13:34:49 -0700, Joerg <invalid_at_invalid.invalid>
wrote:

Quote:
Hi Folks,

Time to paint the house again but the local brands have changed a lot.
Last time was around 14 years ago, and we used Kelly Moore back then.
First their Elastocote and then Latex paint. It held up good but now
some areas suddenly turned bright white, I guess from the intense sun.

Nowadays the locally available brands are Sherwin Williams and Benjamin
Moore from the local paint store, or Behr from Home Depot. Kelly Moore
would require a trip but that's ok if that paint is still the best. I
think the toughest enemy for paint on our house is the hot summer sun.
Not so much the rain because of the rather large roof overhang.

Any opinions? What say thee?

Paints change more often than the expected lifetime of the paint. So
how can anybody tell what's good?


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com

Precision electronic instrumentation
Picosecond-resolution Digital Delay and Pulse generators
Custom laser drivers and controllers
Photonics and fiberoptic TTL data links
VME thermocouple, LVDT, synchro acquisition and simulation

Nico Coesel
Guest

Tue Mar 26, 2013 1:51 am   



"langwadt_at_fonz.dk" <langwadt_at_fonz.dk> wrote:

Quote:
On Mar 25, 8:50=A0pm, n...@puntnl.niks (Nico Coesel) wrote:
Joerg <inva...@invalid.invalid> wrote:
Nico Coesel wrote:
Joerg <inva...@invalid.invalid> wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.f...@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 5:03:41 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.f...@gmail.com wrote:
imaginable application of paint covered.

We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the house. It'=
s
not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached.

I'd still give it a very thourough sanding to remove the layer that
got affected by the sun.

That would take many weeks. The previous paint is very tough to get off.
We'll pressure-wash it though.

You don't have to take everything off. Just a thin layer. An even
surface also gives a much prettyer end result. OTOH a belt sander does
miracles on thick layers of paint.

Our paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more
concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer than th=
e
14 years the Kelly Moore lasted.

14 years is very long. Over here the recommendation is to paint every
8 years if you use very good paint.

In Germany houses weren't painted that often and that's only a few
hundred km from you. Maybe after 20 years or so. But over there I knew
what the good stuff was, paints such as ICI Dulux.

Well you can always skip a few years but you'll get rotten wood if you
wait to long.


I believe it was in Sweden where they tried building a whole bunch of
identical
barracks but only painted half of them.

Turned out to be no significant difference when the construction was
done
right

It depends on the climate and conditions. Half of the country I live
in is basically a big swamp turned.

--
Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
indicates you are not using the right tools...
nico_at_nctdevpuntnl (punt=.)
--------------------------------------------------------------

Nico Coesel
Guest

Tue Mar 26, 2013 1:56 am   



"langwadt_at_fonz.dk" <langwadt_at_fonz.dk> wrote:

Quote:
On Mar 25, 8:50=A0pm, n...@puntnl.niks (Nico Coesel) wrote:
Joerg <inva...@invalid.invalid> wrote:
Nico Coesel wrote:
Joerg <inva...@invalid.invalid> wrote:

bloggs.fredbloggs.f...@gmail.com wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2013 5:03:41 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
bloggs.fredbloggs.f...@gmail.com wrote:
imaginable application of paint covered.

We won't need to prime since there is already paint on the house. It'=
s
not peeling or anything, just sun-bleached.

I'd still give it a very thourough sanding to remove the layer that
got affected by the sun.

That would take many weeks. The previous paint is very tough to get off.
We'll pressure-wash it though.

You don't have to take everything off. Just a thin layer. An even
surface also gives a much prettyer end result. OTOH a belt sander does
miracles on thick layers of paint.

Our paint store doesn't give discounts but that's ok, I am more
concerned that it's good stuff so it lasts maybe a bit longer than th=
e
14 years the Kelly Moore lasted.

14 years is very long. Over here the recommendation is to paint every
8 years if you use very good paint.

In Germany houses weren't painted that often and that's only a few
hundred km from you. Maybe after 20 years or so. But over there I knew
what the good stuff was, paints such as ICI Dulux.

Well you can always skip a few years but you'll get rotten wood if you
wait to long.


I believe it was in Sweden where they tried building a whole bunch of
identical
barracks but only painted half of them.

Turned out to be no significant difference when the construction was
done
right

It depends on the climate and conditions. Half of the country I live
in is basically a big swamp turned into land. Its very warm and humid
in the summer.

--
Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
indicates you are not using the right tools...
nico_at_nctdevpuntnl (punt=.)
--------------------------------------------------------------

Joerg
Guest

Tue Mar 26, 2013 2:04 am   



Martin Riddle wrote:
Quote:
"Joerg" <invalid_at_invalid.invalid> wrote in message
news:arb62cFgvvuU4_at_mid.individual.net...
Martin Riddle wrote:

[...]


Quote:
I painted our eves with this and found out that the big box stores
don't
carry it. You have to find a Glidden retailer, usually a little
hardware
store that is approved by Glidden to sell it. I found out it is a
popular paint used for the houses along the water front, it weathers
very well.

Do you know how that holds up in the blistering sun? Weather isn't a
concern here but heat and UV is.


Also get a semi gloss, there are more Akyds in the gloss versions
which
make for a harder surface that will be more weather resistant. You
can
always do a final coat in satin to cover the shine, wooden floors
are
sometimes done this way.

So far we've always used semi-gloss. It also washes better.
Occasionally
we have those turkey vultures and other birds who seem to have no
qualms
about "letting go" during final approach. Pretty gross.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

It works in NY weather. ...


That's like Siberia :-)


Quote:
... I couldn’t say what the surface temps would be
in 98 degree weather along the shore. But it is perfered, and it does
seem to old up very well. Its not cheap either, I think it was $35/gal.


$35 would be ok, quality is what matters.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

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