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George Herold
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 2:45 am   



So I've read this before, but picked it off my shelf again.
https://www.amazon.com/Inventions-Daedalus-Compendium-Plausible-Schemes-dp-0716714132/dp/0716714132/ref=mt_paperback?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=

It's a fun read! Sorta semi-plausible science with that dry British wit.
And I found "The Further Inventions... " now on order.

George H.

George Herold
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 2:45 am   



On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:07:57 PM UTC-5, Tom Gardner wrote:
Quote:
On 01/02/19 01:02, George Herold wrote:
So I've read this before, but picked it off my shelf again.
https://www.amazon.com/Inventions-Daedalus-Compendium-Plausible-Schemes-dp-0716714132/dp/0716714132/ref=mt_paperback?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid
It's a fun read! Sorta semi-plausible science with that dry British wit.
And I found "The Further Inventions... " now on order.

I picked mine up from a charity shop, and it is on my
coffee table at the moment. I bought it because I
remembered reading the columns in The New Scientist,
a few decades ago.

Maybe I'll take a leaf out of Max Bialystock's playbook
and use them as a basis for some kickstarters.


Apparently He's still writing a column in Nature,
read down here, editorial reviews,
https://www.amazon.com/Further-Inventions-Daedalus-Compendium-Plausible/dp/0198504691/ref=pd_sim_14_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=0198504691&pd_rd_r=3f1d87b3-25bc-11e9-af28-13b30478bfa1&pd_rd_w=0oEy2&pd_rd_wg=ybSHr&pf_rd_p=90485860-83e9-4fd9-b838-b28a9b7fda30&pf_rd_r=XDT5P5CSM7J2APCR3D1A&psc=1&refRID=XDT5P5CSM7J2APCR3D1A

(hmmm sorry, 'further inventions' amazon link.)

Anyway I'm certainly looking forward to my next dose.

George H.

Tom Gardner
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 2:45 am   



On 01/02/19 01:02, George Herold wrote:
Quote:
So I've read this before, but picked it off my shelf again.
https://www.amazon.com/Inventions-Daedalus-Compendium-Plausible-Schemes-dp-0716714132/dp/0716714132/ref=mt_paperback?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=

It's a fun read! Sorta semi-plausible science with that dry British wit.
And I found "The Further Inventions... " now on order.


I picked mine up from a charity shop, and it is on my
coffee table at the moment. I bought it because I
remembered reading the columns in The New Scientist,
a few decades ago.

Maybe I'll take a leaf out of Max Bialystock's playbook
and use them as a basis for some kickstarters.

Mike Coon
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 11:45 pm   



In article <MPG.36bed30d596bfb8b3c_at_news.plus.net>,
gravity_at_mjcoon.plus.com says...
Quote:

In article <db5633be-e1ef-4493-b433-517d01de2e96_at_googlegroups.com>,
gherold_at_teachspin.com says...

On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:07:57 PM UTC-5, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 01/02/19 01:02, George Herold wrote:
So I've read this before, but picked it off my shelf again.
https://www.amazon.com/Inventions-Daedalus-Compendium-Plausible-Schemes-dp-0716714132/dp/0716714132/ref=mt_paperback?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=

It's a fun read! Sorta semi-plausible science with that dry British wit.
And I found "The Further Inventions... " now on order.

I picked mine up from a charity shop, and it is on my
coffee table at the moment. I bought it because I
remembered reading the columns in The New Scientist,
a few decades ago.

Maybe I'll take a leaf out of Max Bialystock's playbook
and use them as a basis for some kickstarters.

Apparently He's still writing a column in Nature,
read down here, editorial reviews,

As a long-term reader and subscriber to NS and reader of Daedalus'
columns I was startled by that because I thought he had died years ago.
A search of the NS archive confirms that, though I was not able to find
the date. I must visit charity shops more often!

Mike.


I now see that Daedalus has his own Wikipedia page that gives his life
as 20 April 1938 ? 19 July 2017: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_E.
_H._Jones>

Mike.

Mike Coon
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 11:45 pm   



In article <db5633be-e1ef-4493-b433-517d01de2e96_at_googlegroups.com>,
gherold_at_teachspin.com says...
Quote:

On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:07:57 PM UTC-5, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 01/02/19 01:02, George Herold wrote:
So I've read this before, but picked it off my shelf again.
https://www.amazon.com/Inventions-Daedalus-Compendium-Plausible-Schemes-dp-0716714132/dp/0716714132/ref=mt_paperback?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=

It's a fun read! Sorta semi-plausible science with that dry British wit.
And I found "The Further Inventions... " now on order.

I picked mine up from a charity shop, and it is on my
coffee table at the moment. I bought it because I
remembered reading the columns in The New Scientist,
a few decades ago.

Maybe I'll take a leaf out of Max Bialystock's playbook
and use them as a basis for some kickstarters.

Apparently He's still writing a column in Nature,
read down here, editorial reviews,


As a long-term reader and subscriber to NS and reader of Daedalus'
columns I was startled by that because I thought he had died years ago.
A search of the NS archive confirms that, though I was not able to find
the date. I must visit charity shops more often!

Mike.

George Herold
Guest

Sat Feb 02, 2019 2:45 am   



On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 5:21:12 PM UTC-5, Mike Coon wrote:
Quote:
In article <MPG.36bed30d596bfb8b3c_at_news.plus.net>,
gravity_at_mjcoon.plus.com says...

In article <db5633be-e1ef-4493-b433-517d01de2e96_at_googlegroups.com>,
gherold_at_teachspin.com says...

On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:07:57 PM UTC-5, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 01/02/19 01:02, George Herold wrote:
So I've read this before, but picked it off my shelf again.
https://www.amazon.com/Inventions-Daedalus-Compendium-Plausible-Schemes-dp-0716714132/dp/0716714132/ref=mt_paperback?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=

It's a fun read! Sorta semi-plausible science with that dry British wit.
And I found "The Further Inventions... " now on order.

I picked mine up from a charity shop, and it is on my
coffee table at the moment. I bought it because I
remembered reading the columns in The New Scientist,
a few decades ago.

Maybe I'll take a leaf out of Max Bialystock's playbook
and use them as a basis for some kickstarters.

Apparently He's still writing a column in Nature,
read down here, editorial reviews,

As a long-term reader and subscriber to NS and reader of Daedalus'
columns I was startled by that because I thought he had died years ago.
A search of the NS archive confirms that, though I was not able to find
the date. I must visit charity shops more often!

Mike.

I now see that Daedalus has his own Wikipedia page that gives his life
as 20 April 1938 ? 19 July 2017: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_E.
_H._Jones

Mike.


Right, I found that today too. RIP.

I must have picked this book up in the late 80's.
(there's a penciled $2 in the corner. PB) I remember reading
and enjoying it. And it's sat on my shelf since.
I'm enjoying it (maybe) more now.
It's a book to be sipped, a few pages/ ideas at a time.

So many fun ideas, Let me copy this snippet,
The page in the book (168) is titled:
'Per funicula ad astra'

Daeadalus, who started the whole aerospace business, has
not lost interest in the field. He has been considering
alternatives to launching satellites by rocket, which he
thinks inelegant and wasteful. He currently has a scheme
to erect on the Equator a tower 22 300 miles high. Such
a tower, rotating with the Earth, would move with orbital
velocity at it's top; so you merely carry your satellite
up and push it off. In case of opposition he has a
cheaper plan which uses a single rocket to launch a
satellite into a slightly higher orbit than this, while paying
out say 24 00 miles of cable. The cable would then be
anchored on the Equator and the satellite would hold it
taut. Further small satellites could then be hoisted up the
cable. Regrettably, Coriolis forces would tend to make the
whole thing lag behind the Earth's rotation during this
operation, but Daedalus reckons that ultimately the
cable tension would bring it back ready for the next
launch.

(New Scientist, 24 December 1964)

<end quote>

George H.
(who loves to reckon things :^)

Phil Hobbs
Guest

Sat Feb 02, 2019 6:45 pm   



On 2/1/19 8:30 PM, George Herold wrote:
Quote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 5:21:12 PM UTC-5, Mike Coon wrote:
In article <MPG.36bed30d596bfb8b3c_at_news.plus.net>,
gravity_at_mjcoon.plus.com says...

In article <db5633be-e1ef-4493-b433-517d01de2e96_at_googlegroups.com>,
gherold_at_teachspin.com says...

On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:07:57 PM UTC-5, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 01/02/19 01:02, George Herold wrote:
So I've read this before, but picked it off my shelf again.
https://www.amazon.com/Inventions-Daedalus-Compendium-Plausible-Schemes-dp-0716714132/dp/0716714132/ref=mt_paperback?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=

It's a fun read! Sorta semi-plausible science with that dry British wit.
And I found "The Further Inventions... " now on order.

I picked mine up from a charity shop, and it is on my
coffee table at the moment. I bought it because I
remembered reading the columns in The New Scientist,
a few decades ago.

Maybe I'll take a leaf out of Max Bialystock's playbook
and use them as a basis for some kickstarters.

Apparently He's still writing a column in Nature,
read down here, editorial reviews,

As a long-term reader and subscriber to NS and reader of Daedalus'
columns I was startled by that because I thought he had died years ago.
A search of the NS archive confirms that, though I was not able to find
the date. I must visit charity shops more often!

Mike.

I now see that Daedalus has his own Wikipedia page that gives his life
as 20 April 1938 ? 19 July 2017: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_E.
_H._Jones

Mike.

Right, I found that today too. RIP.

I must have picked this book up in the late 80's.
(there's a penciled $2 in the corner. PB) I remember reading
and enjoying it. And it's sat on my shelf since.
I'm enjoying it (maybe) more now.
It's a book to be sipped, a few pages/ ideas at a time.

So many fun ideas, Let me copy this snippet,
The page in the book (168) is titled:
'Per funicula ad astra'

Daeadalus, who started the whole aerospace business, has
not lost interest in the field.


My lab is fairly full of consulting jokes, for instance these mugs:

<https://despair.com/collections/coffee-mugs/products/consulting>
<https://despair.com/collections/coffee-mugs/products/revelation> and
<https://despair.com/collections/coffee-mugs/products/marketing>.

The consulting ones go into a cupboard when clients visit. ;)

I also have the original of this one:
<http://www.searchanddiscovery.com/documents/2004/thomas02/images/03.htm>

However the most satisfying is Breughel's "Landscape with the fall of
Icarus",
<https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c2/Pieter_Bruegel_de_Oude_-_De_val_van_Icarus.jpg>

Icarus was a client of the greatest consultant of antiquity: his father
Daedalus. He crashed into the sea because he didn't follow advice, but
as you can see from the picture, everybody else's life went on
uninterrupted. ;)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:45 pm   



On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 12:09:25 -0500, Phil Hobbs
<pcdhSpamMeSenseless_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

Quote:
However the most satisfying is Breughel's "Landscape with the fall of
Icarus",
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c2/Pieter_Bruegel_de_Oude_-_De_val_van_Icarus.jpg

Icarus was a client of the greatest consultant of antiquity: his father
Daedalus. He crashed into the sea because he didn't follow advice, but
as you can see from the picture, everybody else's life went on
uninterrupted. ;)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs


I have a different interpretation. The firm of Daedalus and Son
failed to negotiate an NDA (non-disclosure agreement) for the
labyrinth construction project with King Minos. Justifiably
considering the contractors to be a security risk, King Minos
imprisoned them for an unspecified period, or until the Minotaur died,
whichever came first. Having limited resources available while
imprisoned, Daedalus macgyvered a flying contrivance from was on hand,
which was a feather comforter and candle wax. His instructions to his
son were vague and not very useful. Icarus was warned not to fly too
high or the wax would melt, or too low lest the feathers get wet. No
doubt, he questioned his father asking how high and how low. He
received no usable answer probably because no test pilot was available
to establish performance limits, and they had no altimeter available
for the instrument console. Icarus possibly volunteered to test the
limits with his father flying nearby to record the results.
Unfortunately, the performance data was lost with Icarus as he was
also substituting as the flight recorder.

There are quite a few lessons to be learned from the story. Safety
should have been a higher priority. Material properties should have
been better tested. There should have been a test flight. Flying at
night would have eliminated the solar heating problem. Inventing a
parachute might also have helped.

As a whole, the story is an example of what can happen if one fails to
obtain proper legal advice, doesn't read the fine print on the NDA,
attempts damage control using a solution built from salvaged parts,
fails to accurately determine key performance and operational
parameters, and totally ignores safety concerns by failing to perform
a test flight. Had they not built their flying machines and remained
as guests of King Minos, I'm sure the king could have found good use
for their engineering talents in other projects.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Tom Gardner
Guest

Sun Feb 03, 2019 1:45 am   



On 02/02/19 17:09, Phil Hobbs wrote:
Quote:
My lab is fairly full of consulting jokes, for instance these mugs:

https://despair.com/collections/coffee-mugs/products/revelation> and


While no druid, I certainly cavorted there as a kid.

There was something both exciting and relaxing about climbing
over those stones and eating picnics on them.

No more, alas: you can't get to the stones, let alone touch
them, and the concept of climbing on them provokes
bewilderment.

Fortunately there are still far more relaxed places,
e.g Silbury Hill, Avebury, Long Barrow, Stanton Drew
Ring, and Hetty Pegler's Tump. /Those/ are worth
going to see.

George Herold
Guest

Sun Feb 03, 2019 2:45 am   



On Saturday, February 2, 2019 at 12:09:36 PM UTC-5, Phil Hobbs wrote:
Quote:
On 2/1/19 8:30 PM, George Herold wrote:
On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 5:21:12 PM UTC-5, Mike Coon wrote:
In article <MPG.36bed30d596bfb8b3c_at_news.plus.net>,
gravity_at_mjcoon.plus.com says...

In article <db5633be-e1ef-4493-b433-517d01de2e96_at_googlegroups.com>,
gherold_at_teachspin.com says...

On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 8:07:57 PM UTC-5, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 01/02/19 01:02, George Herold wrote:
So I've read this before, but picked it off my shelf again.
https://www.amazon.com/Inventions-Daedalus-Compendium-Plausible-Schemes-dp-0716714132/dp/0716714132/ref=mt_paperback?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=

It's a fun read! Sorta semi-plausible science with that dry British wit.
And I found "The Further Inventions... " now on order.

I picked mine up from a charity shop, and it is on my
coffee table at the moment. I bought it because I
remembered reading the columns in The New Scientist,
a few decades ago.

Maybe I'll take a leaf out of Max Bialystock's playbook
and use them as a basis for some kickstarters.

Apparently He's still writing a column in Nature,
read down here, editorial reviews,

As a long-term reader and subscriber to NS and reader of Daedalus'
columns I was startled by that because I thought he had died years ago.
A search of the NS archive confirms that, though I was not able to find
the date. I must visit charity shops more often!

Mike.

I now see that Daedalus has his own Wikipedia page that gives his life
as 20 April 1938 ? 19 July 2017: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_E.
_H._Jones

Mike.

Right, I found that today too. RIP.

I must have picked this book up in the late 80's.
(there's a penciled $2 in the corner. PB) I remember reading
and enjoying it. And it's sat on my shelf since.
I'm enjoying it (maybe) more now.
It's a book to be sipped, a few pages/ ideas at a time.

So many fun ideas, Let me copy this snippet,
The page in the book (168) is titled:
'Per funicula ad astra'

Daeadalus, who started the whole aerospace business, has
not lost interest in the field.

My lab is fairly full of consulting jokes, for instance these mugs:

https://despair.com/collections/coffee-mugs/products/consulting
https://despair.com/collections/coffee-mugs/products/revelation> and
https://despair.com/collections/coffee-mugs/products/marketing>.

The consulting ones go into a cupboard when clients visit. ;)

I also have the original of this one:
http://www.searchanddiscovery.com/documents/2004/thomas02/images/03.htm

However the most satisfying is Breughel's "Landscape with the fall of
Icarus",
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c2/Pieter_Bruegel_de_Oude_-_De_val_van_Icarus.jpg


Nice plow! Icarus is the guy with his legs wiggling out of the water?
(You'd have thunk he could have swum to the shore or boat.)

"Three Worlds" by MC Escher is one of my favorite prints
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Worlds_(Escher)

George H.

Quote:

Icarus was a client of the greatest consultant of antiquity: his father
Daedalus. He crashed into the sea because he didn't follow advice, but
as you can see from the picture, everybody else's life went on
uninterrupted. ;)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs


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