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Meat Plow
Guest

Tue Jan 11, 2011 9:31 pm   



Yaesu VX-5R tri-band hand held. Momentary contact power on/off button.

I've owned this radio for 9 or 10 years. Recently I have to push several
times on this rubber on/off button to get the radio to come on. But it
always takes just one touch to turn it off. And the radio works fine
otherwise including all the other buttons. Just have to play around
pressing the button maybe three/four/five times. Sometimes it powers on
when pressed once! But always shuts off with just one easy push.
This indicates to me that it's not a problem with button contact but
rather a microprocessor problem.

Discuss.



--
Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse

PeterD
Guest

Tue Jan 11, 2011 9:31 pm   



On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 19:31:52 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow
<mhywatt_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

Quote:
Yaesu VX-5R tri-band hand held. Momentary contact power on/off button.

I've owned this radio for 9 or 10 years. Recently I have to push several
times on this rubber on/off button to get the radio to come on. But it
always takes just one touch to turn it off. And the radio works fine
otherwise including all the other buttons. Just have to play around
pressing the button maybe three/four/five times. Sometimes it powers on
when pressed once! But always shuts off with just one easy push.
This indicates to me that it's not a problem with button contact but
rather a microprocessor problem.

Discuss.

Discuss? OK here you go (pay attention to the last paragraph, it's
important):

Many statisticians would agree that, had it not been for the UNIVAC
computer, the emulation of flip-flop gates might never have occurred.
Given the current status of efficient archetypes, information
theorists urgently desire the development of information retrieval
systems. The notion that hackers worldwide collude with SCSI disks is
mostly considered essential [1]. Thus, e-business and replicated
configurations are entirely at odds with the synthesis of flip-flop
gates.

Motivated by these observations, flexible algorithms and web browsers
have been extensively constructed by cryptographers. Daringly enough,
indeed, cache coherence and Markov models have a long history of
collaborating in this manner. Nevertheless, this method is generally
considered confusing. This combination of properties has not yet been
deployed in related work.

In order to accomplish this aim, we verify not only that Boolean logic
and 802.11 mesh networks are mostly incompatible, but that the same is
true for cache coherence. For example, many heuristics store the
deployment of active networks. The drawback of this type of approach,
however, is that the foremost large-scale algorithm for the
development of courseware [2] is in Co-NP. Two properties make this
solution different: our algorithm learns the exploration of Byzantine
fault tolerance, and also Strand locates stochastic theory. Existing
distributed and distributed systems use the UNIVAC computer to manage
randomized algorithms. As a result, we see no reason not to use
semantic archetypes to measure atomic information.

Another extensive grand challenge in this area is the study of
802.11b. the disadvantage of this type of method, however, is that
multi-processors and sensor networks can interact to accomplish this
goal. the basic tenet of this solution is the analysis of SMPs. Though
conventional wisdom states that this obstacle is rarely solved by the
development of superblocks, we believe that a different solution is
necessary.

Regarless the authors have seen similar occurances where turn on
failures were related to a necessary time constant that was not
required on turn off phases. Such a time constant was not present as
the switch contacts seemed to fail, such as might happen after many
years of continious use.

Gareth Magennis
Guest

Tue Jan 11, 2011 10:18 pm   



"Meat Plow" <mhywatt_at_yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:pan.2011.01.11.19.31.34_at_lmao.lol.lol...
Quote:
Yaesu VX-5R tri-band hand held. Momentary contact power on/off button.

I've owned this radio for 9 or 10 years. Recently I have to push several
times on this rubber on/off button to get the radio to come on. But it
always takes just one touch to turn it off. And the radio works fine
otherwise including all the other buttons. Just have to play around
pressing the button maybe three/four/five times. Sometimes it powers on
when pressed once! But always shuts off with just one easy push.
This indicates to me that it's not a problem with button contact but
rather a microprocessor problem.

Discuss.





Could be a microprocessor controlled delay programme whereby you have to
hold the on button on for longer to turn it on, than the off button to turn
it off. Perhaps because it is more important to screen out accidental ons
than accidental offs.

And/Or, If the button is dirty, and thus resets its state randomly/rapidly
during a single press, perhaps this results in favour of the Off debounce
and/or delay routines rather than the "On" routines.


Dunno, just a guess.



Gareth.

Dave Platt
Guest

Tue Jan 11, 2011 11:28 pm   



In article <DO3Xo.9499$MD5.8388_at_newsfe23.ams2>,
Gareth Magennis <sound.service_at_btconnect.com> wrote:

Quote:
Yaesu VX-5R tri-band hand held. Momentary contact power on/off button.

I've owned this radio for 9 or 10 years. Recently I have to push several
times on this rubber on/off button to get the radio to come on. But it
always takes just one touch to turn it off. And the radio works fine
otherwise including all the other buttons. Just have to play around
pressing the button maybe three/four/five times. Sometimes it powers on
when pressed once! But always shuts off with just one easy push.
This indicates to me that it's not a problem with button contact but
rather a microprocessor problem.

Could be a microprocessor controlled delay programme whereby you have to
hold the on button on for longer to turn it on, than the off button to turn
it off. Perhaps because it is more important to screen out accidental ons
than accidental offs.

And/Or, If the button is dirty, and thus resets its state randomly/rapidly
during a single press, perhaps this results in favour of the Off debounce
and/or delay routines rather than the "On" routines.

Quite reasonable suggestions.

The usual "field engineering" fix would be to simply replace the
elastomeric key membrane (Yaesu used to make this available as a
standard service item for the VX-5; dunno if it's still available) or
use the CAIG contact-repair kit to re-goop the back of the POWER
button and see if increasing its conductivity fixes the problem.

--
Dave Platt <dplatt_at_radagast.org> AE6EO
Friends of Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!

Meat Plow
Guest

Wed Jan 12, 2011 1:51 am   



On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 14:28:38 -0800, Dave Platt wrote:

Quote:
In article <DO3Xo.9499$MD5.8388_at_newsfe23.ams2>, Gareth Magennis
sound.service_at_btconnect.com> wrote:

Yaesu VX-5R tri-band hand held. Momentary contact power on/off button.

I've owned this radio for 9 or 10 years. Recently I have to push
several times on this rubber on/off button to get the radio to come
on. But it always takes just one touch to turn it off. And the radio
works fine otherwise including all the other buttons. Just have to
play around pressing the button maybe three/four/five times. Sometimes
it powers on when pressed once! But always shuts off with just one
easy push. This indicates to me that it's not a problem with button
contact but rather a microprocessor problem.

Could be a microprocessor controlled delay programme whereby you have to
hold the on button on for longer to turn it on, than the off button to
turn it off. Perhaps because it is more important to screen out
accidental ons than accidental offs.

And/Or, If the button is dirty, and thus resets its state
randomly/rapidly during a single press, perhaps this results in favour
of the Off debounce and/or delay routines rather than the "On" routines.

Quite reasonable suggestions.

The usual "field engineering" fix would be to simply replace the
elastomeric key membrane (Yaesu used to make this available as a
standard service item for the VX-5; dunno if it's still available) or
use the CAIG contact-repair kit to re-goop the back of the POWER button
and see if increasing its conductivity fixes the problem.

I had the unit apart way back when it was new to install the MARS
coverage modification which was just a snip of a wire. The keypad was
that of silicone rubber and a carbon dot on the working side. Pretty
standard. Plus another membrane for water protection. The unit isn't
rated as being water resistant but obviously a handy talkie should have
some moisture resistance. I wouldn't rule out Gareth's observation. It
probably is easier to kill the process than to start it. Only one thing
bothers me and that is I have the add on barometric pressure sensing unit
and it displays when the VX-5 is off. So the microprocessor runs while
the unit is off unless the pressure unit has its own processing.



--
Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse

Meat Plow
Guest

Wed Jan 12, 2011 1:56 am   



On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 21:18:28 +0000, Gareth Magennis wrote:

Quote:
"Meat Plow" <mhywatt_at_yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:pan.2011.01.11.19.31.34_at_lmao.lol.lol...
Yaesu VX-5R tri-band hand held. Momentary contact power on/off button.

I've owned this radio for 9 or 10 years. Recently I have to push
several times on this rubber on/off button to get the radio to come on.
But it always takes just one touch to turn it off. And the radio works
fine otherwise including all the other buttons. Just have to play
around pressing the button maybe three/four/five times. Sometimes it
powers on when pressed once! But always shuts off with just one easy
push. This indicates to me that it's not a problem with button contact
but rather a microprocessor problem.

Discuss.





Could be a microprocessor controlled delay programme whereby you have to
hold the on button on for longer to turn it on, than the off button to
turn it off. Perhaps because it is more important to screen out
accidental ons than accidental offs.

And/Or, If the button is dirty, and thus resets its state
randomly/rapidly during a single press, perhaps this results in favour
of the Off debounce and/or delay routines rather than the "On" routines.


Dunno, just a guess.

Yeah it's a good guess and makes sense however, the optional barometric
pressure sensing unit displays when the unit is off. So some processing
remains. That and the battery discharges faster when placed and the unit
is off over being removed from the unit even without the barometric unit
installed. So again even when powered on their must be some degree of
processing going on. Anyway, when it gets to the point where it is hard
to get the VX-5 to turn on I'll tear it apart. Things are pretty
compressed and it isn't the easiest of things to work on.


--
Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Wed Jan 12, 2011 5:29 am   



On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 19:31:52 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow
<mhywatt_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

Quote:
Yaesu VX-5R tri-band hand held. Momentary contact power on/off button.

I have the same radio. Mine is the somewhat later v1.1.

Quote:
Recently I have to push several
times on this rubber on/off button to get the radio to come on.

Yep. I had the same problem about a year ago. When I opened the
radio, I found wet and greasy goo around most of the keypad buttons.
My guess is a mixture to condensed bad breath and exuded rubber
plasticizer molded into the rubber. I cleaned up the mess with
alcohol and it's been fine ever since.

Quote:
But it
always takes just one touch to turn it off.

Debounce circuit? I do have to hold the on/off a bit longer to turn
it on than to turn it off. My guess is about a full second to turn it
on, and just a tap to turn it off.

Quote:
And the radio works fine
otherwise including all the other buttons. Just have to play around
pressing the button maybe three/four/five times. Sometimes it powers on
when pressed once! But always shuts off with just one easy push.
This indicates to me that it's not a problem with button contact but
rather a microprocessor problem.

Good logic, but without knowing the exact failure mechanism, it might
be problematic. If this is a deteriorating situation, where it worked
normally in the distant past, I would tend to suspect that something
has deteriorated rather than failed.

If not, there's the possibility of firmware problems, which a total
reset and reload from the programming software might fix. I had some
problems with VX-5 Commander:
<http://www.kc8unj.com>
and ended up buying the official Yaesu software (by RT Systems)
<http://www.rtsystemsinc.com>

Quote:
Discuss.

Methinks a frizbee is cheaper than throwing a discus around.



--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

JW
Guest

Wed Jan 12, 2011 11:16 am   



On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 15:01:48 -0500 PeterD <peter2_at_hipson.net> wrote in
Message id: <7mdpi61943k39741mqucorq3evbevh5nbf_at_4ax.com>:

Quote:
On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 19:31:52 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow
mhywatt_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

Yaesu VX-5R tri-band hand held. Momentary contact power on/off button.

I've owned this radio for 9 or 10 years. Recently I have to push several
times on this rubber on/off button to get the radio to come on. But it
always takes just one touch to turn it off. And the radio works fine
otherwise including all the other buttons. Just have to play around
pressing the button maybe three/four/five times. Sometimes it powers on
when pressed once! But always shuts off with just one easy push.
This indicates to me that it's not a problem with button contact but
rather a microprocessor problem.

Discuss.

Discuss? OK here you go (pay attention to the last paragraph, it's
important):

Many statisticians would agree that, had it not been for the UNIVAC
computer, the emulation of flip-flop gates might never have occurred.
Given the current status of efficient archetypes, information
theorists urgently desire the development of information retrieval
systems. The notion that hackers worldwide collude with SCSI disks is
mostly considered essential [1]. Thus, e-business and replicated
configurations are entirely at odds with the synthesis of flip-flop
gates.

Motivated by these observations, flexible algorithms and web browsers
have been extensively constructed by cryptographers. Daringly enough,
indeed, cache coherence and Markov models have a long history of
collaborating in this manner. Nevertheless, this method is generally
considered confusing. This combination of properties has not yet been
deployed in related work.

In order to accomplish this aim, we verify not only that Boolean logic
and 802.11 mesh networks are mostly incompatible, but that the same is
true for cache coherence. For example, many heuristics store the
deployment of active networks. The drawback of this type of approach,
however, is that the foremost large-scale algorithm for the
development of courseware [2] is in Co-NP. Two properties make this
solution different: our algorithm learns the exploration of Byzantine
fault tolerance, and also Strand locates stochastic theory. Existing
distributed and distributed systems use the UNIVAC computer to manage
randomized algorithms. As a result, we see no reason not to use
semantic archetypes to measure atomic information.

Another extensive grand challenge in this area is the study of
802.11b. the disadvantage of this type of method, however, is that
multi-processors and sensor networks can interact to accomplish this
goal. the basic tenet of this solution is the analysis of SMPs. Though
conventional wisdom states that this obstacle is rarely solved by the
development of superblocks, we believe that a different solution is
necessary.

Regarless the authors have seen similar occurances where turn on
failures were related to a necessary time constant that was not
required on turn off phases. Such a time constant was not present as
the switch contacts seemed to fail, such as might happen after many
years of continious use.

I just ran the ClueMeter over your last post, Peter, and I'm sad
to say the reading was...

____________
E F
\
____________

ObSER: Maybe it's broken, though. It seems to give the same reading
whenever it scans one of your posts.

JW
Guest

Wed Jan 12, 2011 11:20 am   



On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 19:31:52 +0000 (UTC) Meat Plow <mhywatt_at_yahoo.com>
wrote in Message id: <pan.2011.01.11.19.31.34_at_lmao.lol.lol>:

Quote:
Yaesu VX-5R tri-band hand held. Momentary contact power on/off button.

I've owned this radio for 9 or 10 years. Recently I have to push several
times on this rubber on/off button to get the radio to come on. But it
always takes just one touch to turn it off. And the radio works fine
otherwise including all the other buttons. Just have to play around
pressing the button maybe three/four/five times. Sometimes it powers on
when pressed once! But always shuts off with just one easy push.
This indicates to me that it's not a problem with button contact but
rather a microprocessor problem.

Discuss.

Is it possible to trace where the two connections to the button go, or do
you have a schematic by any chance?

PeterD
Guest

Wed Jan 12, 2011 3:58 pm   



On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 05:16:56 -0500, JW <none_at_dev.null> wrote:

Quote:
On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 15:01:48 -0500 PeterD <peter2_at_hipson.net> wrote in
Message id: <7mdpi61943k39741mqucorq3evbevh5nbf_at_4ax.com>:

...

Regarless the authors have seen similar occurances where turn on
failures were related to a necessary time constant that was not
required on turn off phases. Such a time constant was not present as
the switch contacts seemed to fail, such as might happen after many
years of continious use.

I just ran the ClueMeter over your last post, Peter, and I'm sad
to say the reading was...


There is likely a time constant to prevent undesired turn-ons which is
why the symptoms appear on only with on and not off. That's why the
last paragraph was important! <g>

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Wed Jan 12, 2011 10:11 pm   



On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 20:21:54 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow
<mhywatt_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

Quote:
I've also had grounding problems with
this radio. Makes the audio howl when you turn it up past 50% on 70
centimeters.

That's not grounding. It's microphonics. The 440 PLL is getting
mechanically modulated by the audio from the loudspeaker. Get the
phase right and you have a howling oscillation. I use bees wax, hot
melt glue, or if desperate, RTV, to reduce the mechanical sensitivity
of the VCO. You might also try a rubber foam pad between the PCB and
the front panel to acoustically decouple the PCB.

Quote:
Other than this, the radio has worked well, the batter has held up
remarkably and the audio is robust. I also have a dual band FT-60. Rock
solid radio, very loud audio with little distortion. Bought it back in
2006 from AES. They had a special on the radio and drop charger that I
couldn't resist.

The local animal rescue volunteer group all got licenses and
standardized on the FT-60. It's a better radio than the VX-5 but is
too much for many of the users to operate. It also has the irritating
WIRES function which must be disarmed before it can be used. They
would have been better off with channelized commercial radios but the
ham stuff was cheaper.

Quote:
I bought a Diamond SRH320A antenna for it. I've worked
repeaters 50 miles away outdoors on 2 meters with that HT.

About 2 years ago, I gave a demo on HT antennas. It didn't take much
to demonstrate that bigger is better, no matter how weird looking. I
placed a field strength meter at a fixed distance from the radio, and
tried various antennas. The best on 440 MHz was an AMOS/Franklin
monstrosity that I conjured for the occasion. It was about 1.5 meters
overall, with the HT in the middle, which had to be held horizontally.
On 2m, it was a flex PCB antenna I had etched into a sheet of mylar,
representing something like a 3 element Yagi. The usual base and
center loaded dual band rubber ducky antennas were horrible by
comparison, but were greatly improved by the addition of a
counterpoise.
<http://www.k6gph.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&catid=1&id=10&Itemid=7>
Incidentally, I brought an inflatable UHF loop yagi antenna that used
a 1 meter long rubber sausage shaped balloon for mechanical support
and insulation. I didn't have time to try it as I ran out of time.
(Hint: I use the stock rubber ducky as everything else is too big and
clumsy).

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Meat Plow
Guest

Wed Jan 12, 2011 10:21 pm   



On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 20:29:36 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Quote:
On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 19:31:52 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow <mhywatt_at_yahoo.com
wrote:

Yaesu VX-5R tri-band hand held. Momentary contact power on/off button.

I have the same radio. Mine is the somewhat later v1.1.

Recently I have to push several
times on this rubber on/off button to get the radio to come on.

Yep. I had the same problem about a year ago. When I opened the radio,
I found wet and greasy goo around most of the keypad buttons. My guess
is a mixture to condensed bad breath and exuded rubber plasticizer
molded into the rubber. I cleaned up the mess with alcohol and it's
been fine ever since.

But it
always takes just one touch to turn it off.

Debounce circuit? I do have to hold the on/off a bit longer to turn it
on than to turn it off. My guess is about a full second to turn it on,
and just a tap to turn it off.

And the radio works fine
otherwise including all the other buttons. Just have to play around
pressing the button maybe three/four/five times. Sometimes it powers on
when pressed once! But always shuts off with just one easy push. This
indicates to me that it's not a problem with button contact but rather a
microprocessor problem.

Good logic, but without knowing the exact failure mechanism, it might be
problematic. If this is a deteriorating situation, where it worked
normally in the distant past, I would tend to suspect that something has
deteriorated rather than failed.

If not, there's the possibility of firmware problems, which a total
reset and reload from the programming software might fix. I had some
problems with VX-5 Commander:
http://www.kc8unj.com
and ended up buying the official Yaesu software (by RT Systems)
http://www.rtsystemsinc.com

Discuss.

Methinks a frizbee is cheaper than throwing a discus around.

Heh. I have the VX-5 software from RT and the data cable. So a reset then
reload might not be a bad idea. I've also had grounding problems with
this radio. Makes the audio howl when you turn it up past 50% on 70
centimeters. Main component board depends on lands around screw holes and
the aluminum chassis is part of the ground. An occasional loose/tight of
the chassis screws seems to cure it for a year or so.

Other than this, the radio has worked well, the batter has held up
remarkably and the audio is robust. I also have a dual band FT-60. Rock
solid radio, very loud audio with little distortion. Bought it back in
2006 from AES. They had a special on the radio and drop charger that I
couldn't resist. I bought a Diamond SRH320A antenna for it. I've worked
repeaters 50 miles away outdoors on 2 meters with that HT.



--
Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse

Dave Platt
Guest

Wed Jan 12, 2011 11:08 pm   



In article <pan.2011.01.12.20.21.35_at_lmao.lol.lol>,
Meat Plow <mhywatt_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

Quote:
Heh. I have the VX-5 software from RT and the data cable. So a reset then
reload might not be a bad idea. I've also had grounding problems with
this radio. Makes the audio howl when you turn it up past 50% on 70
centimeters. Main component board depends on lands around screw holes and
the aluminum chassis is part of the ground. An occasional loose/tight of
the chassis screws seems to cure it for a year or so.

Haven't had that particular problem on my own VX-5. On the other
hand, the SMA antenna connector had a nasty tendency to loosen itself.
I found a Web article suggesting the use of a standard hex-bit-shaft
screwdriver, filed or ground down to create a couple of flanges which
engage the slots in the SMA retaining nut... a handy home-made tool
for re-tightening things. This, plus a small drop of Loctite on the
threads, fixed the problem.

I've been fighting off the temptation to just remove the SMA, drill
out the hole, and replacing it with a BNC.

Quote:
Other than this, the radio has worked well, the batter has held up
remarkably and the audio is robust. I also have a dual band FT-60. Rock
solid radio, very loud audio with little distortion. Bought it back in
2006 from AES. They had a special on the radio and drop charger that I
couldn't resist. I bought a Diamond SRH320A antenna for it. I've worked
repeaters 50 miles away outdoors on 2 meters with that HT.

It's amazing how far one can work with little power, with a clear
line-of-sight. I recently had a nice QSO on the repeater I help
maintain, with a ham sitting in a hotel room up in San Francisco
(about 45 miles from the repeater) talking on his HT. He was using a
roll-up twinlead J-pole. Sounded as if he was right next to the
repeater.

--
Dave Platt <dplatt_at_radagast.org> AE6EO
Friends of Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!

Dave Platt
Guest

Thu Jan 13, 2011 12:26 am   



In article <pan.2011.01.12.23.02.44_at_lmao.lol.lol>,
Meat Plow <mhywatt_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

Quote:
I've been fighting off the temptation to just remove the SMA, drill out
the hole, and replacing it with a BNC.

That might be difficult considering the SMA on the VX-5 is recessed. Also
I don't know if there's room inside bor the butt end of a BNC.

What I was thinking, was mounting the BNC on the top of the case...
there appears to be enough metal surrounding the recessed-SMA mounting
hold to support it. Stick the "butt end" of the BNC down through the
SMA mounting hole and into the case. I'd probably need to fix it into
place with epoxy rather than using a nut, though.

It'd certainly be an invasive mod, and probably quite unnecessary. I
wouldn't do it unless I didn'd mind trashing the radio - or at least
the case. If I even run into a "beater" VX-5, with an intact case but
a fried radio, I might buy it and just try modding the case.

Quote:
I've had to tighten up the SMA on mine maybe twice. But I also use an OEM
antenna and I'm not sure if that contributes because the OEMS don't seat
all the way down in. I ended up putting a small grommet around the bottom
of the SMA on the radio so the antenna tightens down on the chassis
rather than just the threads. Seems to have cured the problem.

I generally use an SMA-to-BNC adapter, with a grommit-like arrangement
made out of a couple of thicknesses of rubber tubing, and then use an
aftermarket BNC antenna.

--
Dave Platt <dplatt_at_radagast.org> AE6EO
Friends of Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!

Meat Plow
Guest

Thu Jan 13, 2011 1:03 am   



On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:08:48 -0800, Dave Platt wrote:

Quote:
In article <pan.2011.01.12.20.21.35_at_lmao.lol.lol>, Meat Plow
mhywatt_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

Heh. I have the VX-5 software from RT and the data cable. So a reset
then reload might not be a bad idea. I've also had grounding problems
with this radio. Makes the audio howl when you turn it up past 50% on 70
centimeters. Main component board depends on lands around screw holes
and the aluminum chassis is part of the ground. An occasional
loose/tight of the chassis screws seems to cure it for a year or so.

Haven't had that particular problem on my own VX-5. On the other hand,
the SMA antenna connector had a nasty tendency to loosen itself. I found
a Web article suggesting the use of a standard hex-bit-shaft
screwdriver, filed or ground down to create a couple of flanges which
engage the slots in the SMA retaining nut... a handy home-made tool for
re-tightening things. This, plus a small drop of Loctite on the
threads, fixed the problem.

I've been fighting off the temptation to just remove the SMA, drill out
the hole, and replacing it with a BNC.

That might be difficult considering the SMA on the VX-5 is recessed. Also
I don't know if there's room inside bor the butt end of a BNC.
I've had to tighten up the SMA on mine maybe twice. But I also use an OEM
antenna and I'm not sure if that contributes because the OEMS don't seat
all the way down in. I ended up putting a small grommet around the bottom
of the SMA on the radio so the antenna tightens down on the chassis
rather than just the threads. Seems to have cured the problem. On the
FT-60 the nut his a hex nut not recessed but rather the stock antenna
screws down over the nut. I believe the contact between antenna base and
chassis helps to keep the nut tight. The OEM Diamond does not screw over
the nut but rather directly down on top of it. Good enough for me since
the nut is essentially part of the chassis. This one has never budged.

Quote:
Other than this, the radio has worked well, the batter has held up
remarkably and the audio is robust. I also have a dual band FT-60. Rock
solid radio, very loud audio with little distortion. Bought it back in
2006 from AES. They had a special on the radio and drop charger that I
couldn't resist. I bought a Diamond SRH320A antenna for it. I've worked
repeaters 50 miles away outdoors on 2 meters with that HT.

It's amazing how far one can work with little power, with a clear
line-of-sight. I recently had a nice QSO on the repeater I help
maintain, with a ham sitting in a hotel room up in San Francisco (about
45 miles from the repeater) talking on his HT. He was using a roll-up
twinlead J-pole. Sounded as if he was right next to the repeater.

On simplex channels I always reduce the power to the minimum on my Icom
706 MKII/G. No need when you're 5 watts on an HT. My 'home' repeater is
about 12 miles north. Antennas are on top 90' of tower and the radio is a
converted GE Master II UHF 100 watt. It's been in operation since 1995.
It's a privately owned open repeater. Well open until we start hearing
some VE stations which is a big surprise, UHF ducting. Or VHF repeater is
on tone but had VE repeater interference when conditions were right.

I'm hoping for some decent solar activity soon. Back a decade ago I have
some good friends in the UK I talked to every morning on 28.337. Kind of
miss talking to them but keep in touch via the net and Skype.

I used to do a lot of digital also. And tried like heck to decode
commercial TDMA/FSK BAUDOT etc.. It could be done 10 -15 years ago but
most is encrypted now or in odd mark/space 7 bit Blah blah blah. Amateur
Pactor and 1200 baud packet is still pretty popular here.



--
Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse

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