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Commander Kinsey
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:45 pm   



On Tue, 01 Jan 2019 20:17:15 -0000, Mr Pounder Esquire <MrPounder_at_rationalthought.com> wrote:

Quote:
Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 20:49:18 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net
wrote:
On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 3:36:05 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg
wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 13:29:15 -0000, trader_4
trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:
On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:22:52 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg
wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:16:33 -0000, Mark Lloyd <not_at_mail.invalid
wrote:
On 12/29/18 12:52 PM, William Gothberg wrote:

[snip]

Microwaving something in a cheap shit plastic container is
insane. I always cook or eat things in a real pot bowl. Plastic
melts!

The first thing I heated in a microwave was frozen macaroni and
cheese. The instructions said to cover it in plastic wrap. It
didn't take me long to figure out that it was a really bad idea,
consider trying to separate melted plastic from melted cheese.

Indeed, that cheap shit plastic melts in a 700W microwave oven. Or in
any microwave oven, it can't handle boiling water, which
inevitably you get from the food. And I bet it's rather toxic.

Which is why when DEFROSTING something that's in a plastic
container you use the DEFROST cycle that uses low power and then cycles
even
that after about 75 secs.

I'm not talking about defrosting. I've bought ready meals which
are sat at room or fridge temperature, they go in the microwave to
heat and the plastic melts.
You've said you just use yours for cooking pre-made
frozen dinners and the like, which is crap I wouldn't even eat.

It's more tasty and quicker to make :-)

Others here use microwaves for other uses, including defrosting
raw foods that you don't want to cook in the microwave. I gave
you an example, pork chops. I want them DEFROSTED, not cooked. Once
DEFROSTED, I can then brine them, marinate them, grill them,
so what I would with any fresh pork chops.

What a palava. We invented ready meals for a reason.

Or defrosting tomato sauce that in a plastic container. I want
the sauce DEFROSTED, not a melted container. I suppose I should
only freeze foods in ceramic bowls that go in a microwave?

You take them out of the container they were in dumbass.

You can't get most frozen food, like sauce, out of a one quart
plastic container until it's at least partially defrosted moron. You
wouldn't even know, because you apparently don't prepare and then freeze
food in those kinds of
containers.

I don't freeze things in stupid containers, no.

You're living off pre-cooked, TV dinner crap. Anyone that makes a
post saying there is no reason not to cook pizza in a microwave has
already said way more than enough about their knowledge of food and
cooking.
We have a show here you could be on, Worst Cooks in America.

You carry on wasting your time if you like, I have hobbies and other
things I prefer to do than fucking about making food. Food is a
fuel, if it tastes nice and gives me energy, that's fine, then I can
get on with my life.
And fix your newsreader, why is it allergic to crossposts? You're
breaking the conversation into four parts moron.

Prick.


Go on, get yourself a hobby.

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:45 pm   



On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 23:04:29 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 5:39:43 PM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 11:34:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:24:35 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:20:18 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 12:16:27 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 10:21:46 -0000, Max Demian <max_demian_at_bigfoot.com> wrote:

On 30/12/2018 03:18, Bill Wright wrote:
On 29/12/2018 17:35, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:15:05 -0000, Bill Wright
wrightsaerials_at_f2s.com> wrote:

On 29/12/2018 16:27, William Gothberg wrote:

It can take 5 minutes to warm something from frozen to eating
temperature. I see no reason that couldn't be made into 2 minutes.

Conduction

Which would be way faster if the water content the microwaves were
hitting was heated hotter.

But the difference in temp between the outside and the inside of the
food would be greater and this could result in food that was both over-
and under-cooked. This is why microwave ovens have low settings, so food
can cook slowly and evenly. Anyone who uses a microwave a lot will be
well aware of this. For items where convection can assist conduction
higher power can be fine, but not for large solid lumps of food.

I can't say many things I cook have large solid lumps. All ready meals are pretty much fluid, so convection and conduction can take place, and almost everything I cook is a dish of something which is only 2 inches deep.

I don't know what the low settings are for. All the instructions I've
seen - e.g. on ready meals - say "full power". There is the defrost
setting, but microwaves aren't very good at defrosting as they don't
heat frozen water very well.

Mine thaws a frozen (already cooked) pizza extremely well, on full power. It turns a -20C pizza into a +40C pizza in 4 minutes.

Only a moron would cook a pizza in a microwave.

No, anyone who wants it ready more quickly. I buy the frozen pizza in the supermarket, place it in the microwave, then I can eat it in 4 minutes.

Why would you think pizzas shouldn't go in microwaves?! Every foodstuff can be cooked in a microwave.

Because some of us are more interested in good results than in speed.

When I want pizza, I make the crust from scratch, wait for it to rise,
shape it, top it, and bake it at 550 F.

And your stomach is happy to wait?!

A pre-made, frozen pizza is also an order of magnitude better baked in a real oven


No it isn't. The cooking has already been done. All we have to do is apply heat to make it a nice palatable temperature.

> and it does not take very long.

Yes it does, firstly you have to warm up the oven....

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:45 pm   



On Tue, 01 Jan 2019 13:00:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 5:39:43 PM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 11:34:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:24:35 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:20:18 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 12:16:27 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 10:21:46 -0000, Max Demian <max_demian_at_bigfoot.com> wrote:

On 30/12/2018 03:18, Bill Wright wrote:
On 29/12/2018 17:35, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:15:05 -0000, Bill Wright
wrightsaerials_at_f2s.com> wrote:

On 29/12/2018 16:27, William Gothberg wrote:

It can take 5 minutes to warm something from frozen to eating
temperature. I see no reason that couldn't be made into 2 minutes.

Conduction

Which would be way faster if the water content the microwaves were
hitting was heated hotter.

But the difference in temp between the outside and the inside of the
food would be greater and this could result in food that was both over-
and under-cooked. This is why microwave ovens have low settings, so food
can cook slowly and evenly. Anyone who uses a microwave a lot will be
well aware of this. For items where convection can assist conduction
higher power can be fine, but not for large solid lumps of food.

I can't say many things I cook have large solid lumps. All ready meals are pretty much fluid, so convection and conduction can take place, and almost everything I cook is a dish of something which is only 2 inches deep.

I don't know what the low settings are for. All the instructions I've
seen - e.g. on ready meals - say "full power". There is the defrost
setting, but microwaves aren't very good at defrosting as they don't
heat frozen water very well.

Mine thaws a frozen (already cooked) pizza extremely well, on full power. It turns a -20C pizza into a +40C pizza in 4 minutes.

Only a moron would cook a pizza in a microwave.

No, anyone who wants it ready more quickly. I buy the frozen pizza in the supermarket, place it in the microwave, then I can eat it in 4 minutes.

Why would you think pizzas shouldn't go in microwaves?! Every foodstuff can be cooked in a microwave.

Because some of us are more interested in good results than in speed.

When I want pizza, I make the crust from scratch, wait for it to rise,
shape it, top it, and bake it at 550 F.

And your stomach is happy to wait?!

Sure. I plan ahead, and the pizza is ready when my stomach is.


When I see food, I get hungry, it's a natural instinct. Therefore I cannot prepare food without consuming half the ingredients during the cooking operation.

> If I want something fast, I have scrambled eggs.

I always want something fast, therefore I cook EVERYTHING in a microwave. Even things that say you have to use an oven, I ignore it and use the microwave, funnily enough it tastes nice and is edible.

Peeler
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 11:45 pm   



On Wed, 2 Jan 2019 07:02:09 +1100, dkol, better known as cantankerous
nym-shifting trolling senile geezer Rot Speed, wrote:

<FLUSH another 109 lines of sick trollshit>

--
Another TYPICAL retarded "conversation" between the two resident idiots:

Birdbrain: "But imagine how cool it was to own slaves."

Senile Rot: "Yeah, right. Feed them, clothe them, and fix them when they're
broken.
After all, you paid good money for them. Then you've got to keep an eye
on them all the time."

Birdbrain: "Better than having to give them wages on top of that."

Senile Rot: "Specially when they make more slaves for you
and produce their own food and clothes."

MID: <fvlcdcFq2icU1_at_mid.individual.net>

dkol
Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 12:45 am   



"Commander Kinsey" <CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote in message
news:op.zuyhu4vkwdg98l_at_desktop-ga2mpl8.lan...
Quote:
On Tue, 01 Jan 2019 13:00:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 5:39:43 PM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 11:34:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:24:35 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg
wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:20:18 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net
wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 12:16:27 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg
wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 10:21:46 -0000, Max Demian
max_demian_at_bigfoot.com> wrote:

On 30/12/2018 03:18, Bill Wright wrote:
On 29/12/2018 17:35, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:15:05 -0000, Bill Wright
wrightsaerials_at_f2s.com> wrote:

On 29/12/2018 16:27, William Gothberg wrote:

It can take 5 minutes to warm something from frozen to
eating
temperature. I see no reason that couldn't be made into 2
minutes.

Conduction

Which would be way faster if the water content the microwaves
were
hitting was heated hotter.

But the difference in temp between the outside and the inside
of the
food would be greater and this could result in food that was
both over-
and under-cooked. This is why microwave ovens have low
settings, so food
can cook slowly and evenly. Anyone who uses a microwave a lot
will be
well aware of this. For items where convection can assist
conduction
higher power can be fine, but not for large solid lumps of
food.

I can't say many things I cook have large solid lumps. All ready
meals are pretty much fluid, so convection and conduction can take
place, and almost everything I cook is a dish of something which
is only 2 inches deep.

I don't know what the low settings are for. All the instructions
I've
seen - e.g. on ready meals - say "full power". There is the
defrost
setting, but microwaves aren't very good at defrosting as they
don't
heat frozen water very well.

Mine thaws a frozen (already cooked) pizza extremely well, on full
power. It turns a -20C pizza into a +40C pizza in 4 minutes.

Only a moron would cook a pizza in a microwave.

No, anyone who wants it ready more quickly. I buy the frozen pizza
in the supermarket, place it in the microwave, then I can eat it in 4
minutes.

Why would you think pizzas shouldn't go in microwaves?! Every
foodstuff can be cooked in a microwave.

Because some of us are more interested in good results than in speed.

When I want pizza, I make the crust from scratch, wait for it to rise,
shape it, top it, and bake it at 550 F.

And your stomach is happy to wait?!

Sure. I plan ahead, and the pizza is ready when my stomach is.

When I see food, I get hungry, it's a natural instinct. Therefore I
cannot prepare food without consuming half the ingredients during the
cooking operation.


Yes, you actually are that terminal a fuckwit.

Quote:
If I want something fast, I have scrambled eggs.

I always want something fast,


Just another stupid little kid that must have everything right away.

> therefore I cook EVERYTHING in a microwave.

Yes, you actually are that terminal a fuckwit.

Quote:
Even things that say you have to use an oven, I ignore it and use the
microwave,


Yes, you actually are that terminal a fuckwit.

> funnily enough it tastes nice and is edible.

Tastes much better when done the right way
with all except boiled veg and a few other things.

Peeler
Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 12:45 am   



On Wed, 2 Jan 2019 10:07:28 +1100, dkol, better known as cantankerous
nym-shifting trolling senile geezer Rot Speed, wrote:


<FLUSH the two prize idiots' latest idiotic drivel unread again>


--
Typical retarded "conversation" between the Scottish wanker and senile
Ozzietard:

Birdbrain: "Horse shit doesn't stink."

Senile Rot: "It does if you roll in it."

Birdbrain: "I've never worked out why, I assumed it was maybe meateaters
that made stinky shit, but then why does vegetarian human shit stink? Is it
just the fact that we're capable of digesting meat?"

Senile Rot: "Nope, some cow shit stinks too."

Message-ID: <fv5f1tFi3f2U1_at_mid.individual.net>

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 5:45 pm   



On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 11:26:00 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Tuesday, January 1, 2019 at 3:58:10 PM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 01 Jan 2019 13:00:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 5:39:43 PM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 11:34:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:24:35 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:20:18 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 12:16:27 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 10:21:46 -0000, Max Demian <max_demian_at_bigfoot.com> wrote:

On 30/12/2018 03:18, Bill Wright wrote:
On 29/12/2018 17:35, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:15:05 -0000, Bill Wright
wrightsaerials_at_f2s.com> wrote:

On 29/12/2018 16:27, William Gothberg wrote:

It can take 5 minutes to warm something from frozen to eating
temperature. I see no reason that couldn't be made into 2 minutes.

Conduction

Which would be way faster if the water content the microwaves were
hitting was heated hotter.

But the difference in temp between the outside and the inside of the
food would be greater and this could result in food that was both over-
and under-cooked. This is why microwave ovens have low settings, so food
can cook slowly and evenly. Anyone who uses a microwave a lot will be
well aware of this. For items where convection can assist conduction
higher power can be fine, but not for large solid lumps of food.

I can't say many things I cook have large solid lumps. All ready meals are pretty much fluid, so convection and conduction can take place, and almost everything I cook is a dish of something which is only 2 inches deep.

I don't know what the low settings are for. All the instructions I've
seen - e.g. on ready meals - say "full power". There is the defrost
setting, but microwaves aren't very good at defrosting as they don't
heat frozen water very well.

Mine thaws a frozen (already cooked) pizza extremely well, on full power. It turns a -20C pizza into a +40C pizza in 4 minutes.

Only a moron would cook a pizza in a microwave.

No, anyone who wants it ready more quickly. I buy the frozen pizza in the supermarket, place it in the microwave, then I can eat it in 4 minutes.

Why would you think pizzas shouldn't go in microwaves?! Every foodstuff can be cooked in a microwave.

Because some of us are more interested in good results than in speed.

When I want pizza, I make the crust from scratch, wait for it to rise,
shape it, top it, and bake it at 550 F.

And your stomach is happy to wait?!

Sure. I plan ahead, and the pizza is ready when my stomach is.

When I see food, I get hungry, it's a natural instinct. Therefore I cannot prepare food without consuming half the ingredients during the cooking operation.

Like a child.


No, it's an INSTINCT. Look it up.

Quote:
If I want something fast, I have scrambled eggs.

I always want something fast, therefore I cook EVERYTHING in a microwave. Even things that say you have to use an oven, I ignore it and use the microwave, funnily enough it tastes nice and is edible.

You have an undeveloped palate.


I eat because I need energy. There are plenty thing in life that are more fun than eating. I don't eat as a hobby.

Quote:
Ready meals taste "nice" because they
hit your evolutionary preferences for fat, salt, and sugar.


My tastes tell me what I need to eat. Fat salt and sugar are requirements for survival.

Quote:
The manufacturers do that deliberately so you won't notice how truly
wretched the underlying taste is.


What's wretched about food that gives me energy? It's a fuel and nothing more. Do you buy your car tasty petrol?

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 5:45 pm   



On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 13:26:42 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Wednesday, January 2, 2019 at 6:26:03 AM UTC-5, angelica...@yahoo.com wrote:
On Tuesday, January 1, 2019 at 3:58:10 PM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 01 Jan 2019 13:00:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 5:39:43 PM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 11:34:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:24:35 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:20:18 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 12:16:27 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 10:21:46 -0000, Max Demian <max_demian_at_bigfoot.com> wrote:

On 30/12/2018 03:18, Bill Wright wrote:
On 29/12/2018 17:35, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:15:05 -0000, Bill Wright
wrightsaerials_at_f2s.com> wrote:

On 29/12/2018 16:27, William Gothberg wrote:

It can take 5 minutes to warm something from frozen to eating
temperature. I see no reason that couldn't be made into 2 minutes.

Conduction

Which would be way faster if the water content the microwaves were
hitting was heated hotter.

But the difference in temp between the outside and the inside of the
food would be greater and this could result in food that was both over-
and under-cooked. This is why microwave ovens have low settings, so food
can cook slowly and evenly. Anyone who uses a microwave a lot will be
well aware of this. For items where convection can assist conduction
higher power can be fine, but not for large solid lumps of food.

I can't say many things I cook have large solid lumps. All ready meals are pretty much fluid, so convection and conduction can take place, and almost everything I cook is a dish of something which is only 2 inches deep.

I don't know what the low settings are for. All the instructions I've
seen - e.g. on ready meals - say "full power". There is the defrost
setting, but microwaves aren't very good at defrosting as they don't
heat frozen water very well.

Mine thaws a frozen (already cooked) pizza extremely well, on full power. It turns a -20C pizza into a +40C pizza in 4 minutes.

Only a moron would cook a pizza in a microwave.

No, anyone who wants it ready more quickly. I buy the frozen pizza in the supermarket, place it in the microwave, then I can eat it in 4 minutes.

Why would you think pizzas shouldn't go in microwaves?! Every foodstuff can be cooked in a microwave.

Because some of us are more interested in good results than in speed.

When I want pizza, I make the crust from scratch, wait for it to rise,
shape it, top it, and bake it at 550 F.

And your stomach is happy to wait?!

Sure. I plan ahead, and the pizza is ready when my stomach is.

When I see food, I get hungry, it's a natural instinct. Therefore I cannot prepare food without consuming half the ingredients during the cooking operation.

Like a child.

If I want something fast, I have scrambled eggs.

I always want something fast, therefore I cook EVERYTHING in a microwave. Even things that say you have to use an oven, I ignore it and use the microwave, funnily enough it tastes nice and is edible.

You have an undeveloped palate. Ready meals taste "nice" because they
hit your evolutionary preferences for fat, salt, and sugar. The
manufacturers do that deliberately so you won't notice how truly
wretched the underlying taste is.

Cindy Hamilton

It's still mostly wretched compared to real cooked food that you prepare
yourself. The idea that a pizza cooked in a microwave is representative
of good pizza is absurd. The vast majority of the commercial frozen pizzas
that I've seen do not say that they should be or can be cooked in a
microwave.


They're ALREADY cooked, you're reheating them. A microwave is perfectly capable of this. Even if you were actually cooking them, it's easy enough to change the power level accordingly. But there's no reason to reduce the maximum power available. When you just want to heat something rapidly, you need as much power as possible.

Quote:
There are a few small pizzas designed for a microwave and they
have to play tricks, like have a piece of metalized cardboard to try to
crisp up the bottom. It doesn't work well and the one I tried was also
among the crappiest pizzas for other reasons too.


Again, it's ALREADY cooked and crisped. If you were actually cooking it, you can turn the grill or oven function on on your microwave simultaneously.

Quote:
I suppose next they will be trying to tell us that you can make your cakes
in an microwave


An microwave? Perhaps it was in an hotel? You sound like a Monty Python sketch.

Quote:
instead of a conventional oven too. There is a product out
that claims to make a muffin in a mug. It's a mix that you combine with
water and microwave. I figured it was going to be crap, but for $1 I
figured I'd try it. Total crap, nothing like a real, properly baked muffin.


Are you gay or something? I've just eaten some instant mash potato, tastes just like real potatos and took only 4 minutes to make, instead of a whole fucking hour while I starve to death.

Quote:
Maybe it's all that TV dinner crap that makes them into trolls?

products that are


Huh?

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 6:45 pm   



On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 16:43:20 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Wednesday, January 2, 2019 at 10:58:16 AM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 13:26:42 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

On Wednesday, January 2, 2019 at 6:26:03 AM UTC-5, angelica...@yahoo.com wrote:
On Tuesday, January 1, 2019 at 3:58:10 PM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 01 Jan 2019 13:00:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 5:39:43 PM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 11:34:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:24:35 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:20:18 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 12:16:27 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 10:21:46 -0000, Max Demian <max_demian_at_bigfoot.com> wrote:

On 30/12/2018 03:18, Bill Wright wrote:
On 29/12/2018 17:35, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:15:05 -0000, Bill Wright
wrightsaerials_at_f2s.com> wrote:

On 29/12/2018 16:27, William Gothberg wrote:

It can take 5 minutes to warm something from frozen to eating
temperature. I see no reason that couldn't be made into 2 minutes.

Conduction

Which would be way faster if the water content the microwaves were
hitting was heated hotter.

But the difference in temp between the outside and the inside of the
food would be greater and this could result in food that was both over-
and under-cooked. This is why microwave ovens have low settings, so food
can cook slowly and evenly. Anyone who uses a microwave a lot will be
well aware of this. For items where convection can assist conduction
higher power can be fine, but not for large solid lumps of food.

I can't say many things I cook have large solid lumps. All ready meals are pretty much fluid, so convection and conduction can take place, and almost everything I cook is a dish of something which is only 2 inches deep.

I don't know what the low settings are for. All the instructions I've
seen - e.g. on ready meals - say "full power". There is the defrost
setting, but microwaves aren't very good at defrosting as they don't
heat frozen water very well.

Mine thaws a frozen (already cooked) pizza extremely well, on full power. It turns a -20C pizza into a +40C pizza in 4 minutes.

Only a moron would cook a pizza in a microwave.

No, anyone who wants it ready more quickly. I buy the frozen pizza in the supermarket, place it in the microwave, then I can eat it in 4 minutes.

Why would you think pizzas shouldn't go in microwaves?! Every foodstuff can be cooked in a microwave.

Because some of us are more interested in good results than in speed.

When I want pizza, I make the crust from scratch, wait for it to rise,
shape it, top it, and bake it at 550 F.

And your stomach is happy to wait?!

Sure. I plan ahead, and the pizza is ready when my stomach is.

When I see food, I get hungry, it's a natural instinct. Therefore I cannot prepare food without consuming half the ingredients during the cooking operation.

Like a child.

If I want something fast, I have scrambled eggs.

I always want something fast, therefore I cook EVERYTHING in a microwave. Even things that say you have to use an oven, I ignore it and use the microwave, funnily enough it tastes nice and is edible.

You have an undeveloped palate. Ready meals taste "nice" because they
hit your evolutionary preferences for fat, salt, and sugar. The
manufacturers do that deliberately so you won't notice how truly
wretched the underlying taste is.

Cindy Hamilton

It's still mostly wretched compared to real cooked food that you prepare
yourself. The idea that a pizza cooked in a microwave is representative
of good pizza is absurd. The vast majority of the commercial frozen pizzas
that I've seen do not say that they should be or can be cooked in a
microwave.

They're ALREADY cooked, you're reheating them. A microwave is perfectly capable of this. Even if you were actually cooking them, it's easy enough to change the power level accordingly. But there's no reason to reduce the maximum power available. When you just want to heat something rapidly, you need as much power as possible.

There are a few small pizzas designed for a microwave and they
have to play tricks, like have a piece of metalized cardboard to try to
crisp up the bottom. It doesn't work well and the one I tried was also
among the crappiest pizzas for other reasons too.

Again, it's ALREADY cooked and crisped. If you were actually cooking it, you can turn the grill or oven function on on your microwave simultaneously.

IDK what kind of crap you have over there, but here, in the USA, frozen
pizza is not cooked. The crust is dough that needs to be baked,
the cheese needs to be melted, etc. I suspect, as usual from past
experience, you're full of shit and pizza in the UK is similar. And
the vast majority of pizza COOKING instructions say to put it in a
regular oven, not a microwave. For obvious reasons.


No, it's pre-cooked, why would I buy a pre-made pizza and still have to do the work myself? If I wanted a home made pizza, I'd start from scratch.
https://groceries.asda.com/product/thin-crust-pizza/asda-mediterranean-vegetable-extra-thin-crispy-pizza/910000479897

dkol
Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 9:45 pm   



"Commander Kinsey" <CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote in message
news:op.zuz03htawdg98l_at_desktop-ga2mpl8.lan...
Quote:
On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 16:43:20 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net
wrote:

On Wednesday, January 2, 2019 at 10:58:16 AM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey
wrote:
On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 13:26:42 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net
wrote:

On Wednesday, January 2, 2019 at 6:26:03 AM UTC-5,
angelica...@yahoo.com wrote:
On Tuesday, January 1, 2019 at 3:58:10 PM UTC-5, Commander Kinsey
wrote:
On Tue, 01 Jan 2019 13:00:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com
wrote:

On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 5:39:43 PM UTC-5, Commander
Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 11:34:40 -0000,
angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:24:35 PM UTC-5, William
Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:20:18 -0000, trader_4
trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 12:16:27 PM UTC-5, William
Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 10:21:46 -0000, Max Demian
max_demian_at_bigfoot.com> wrote:

On 30/12/2018 03:18, Bill Wright wrote:
On 29/12/2018 17:35, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:15:05 -0000, Bill Wright
wrightsaerials_at_f2s.com> wrote:

On 29/12/2018 16:27, William Gothberg wrote:

It can take 5 minutes to warm something from frozen
to eating
temperature. I see no reason that couldn't be made
into 2 minutes.

Conduction

Which would be way faster if the water content the
microwaves were
hitting was heated hotter.

But the difference in temp between the outside and the
inside of the
food would be greater and this could result in food
that was both over-
and under-cooked. This is why microwave ovens have low
settings, so food
can cook slowly and evenly. Anyone who uses a microwave
a lot will be
well aware of this. For items where convection can
assist conduction
higher power can be fine, but not for large solid lumps
of food.

I can't say many things I cook have large solid lumps.
All ready meals are pretty much fluid, so convection and
conduction can take place, and almost everything I cook is
a dish of something which is only 2 inches deep.

I don't know what the low settings are for. All the
instructions I've
seen - e.g. on ready meals - say "full power". There is
the defrost
setting, but microwaves aren't very good at defrosting
as they don't
heat frozen water very well.

Mine thaws a frozen (already cooked) pizza extremely well,
on full power. It turns a -20C pizza into a +40C pizza in
4 minutes.

Only a moron would cook a pizza in a microwave.

No, anyone who wants it ready more quickly. I buy the frozen
pizza in the supermarket, place it in the microwave, then I
can eat it in 4 minutes.

Why would you think pizzas shouldn't go in microwaves?!
Every foodstuff can be cooked in a microwave.

Because some of us are more interested in good results than in
speed.

When I want pizza, I make the crust from scratch, wait for it
to rise,
shape it, top it, and bake it at 550 F.

And your stomach is happy to wait?!

Sure. I plan ahead, and the pizza is ready when my stomach is.

When I see food, I get hungry, it's a natural instinct. Therefore
I cannot prepare food without consuming half the ingredients during
the cooking operation.

Like a child.

If I want something fast, I have scrambled eggs.

I always want something fast, therefore I cook EVERYTHING in a
microwave. Even things that say you have to use an oven, I ignore
it and use the microwave, funnily enough it tastes nice and is
edible.

You have an undeveloped palate. Ready meals taste "nice" because
they
hit your evolutionary preferences for fat, salt, and sugar. The
manufacturers do that deliberately so you won't notice how truly
wretched the underlying taste is.

Cindy Hamilton

It's still mostly wretched compared to real cooked food that you
prepare
yourself. The idea that a pizza cooked in a microwave is
representative
of good pizza is absurd. The vast majority of the commercial frozen
pizzas
that I've seen do not say that they should be or can be cooked in a
microwave.

They're ALREADY cooked, you're reheating them. A microwave is perfectly
capable of this. Even if you were actually cooking them, it's easy
enough to change the power level accordingly. But there's no reason to
reduce the maximum power available. When you just want to heat
something rapidly, you need as much power as possible.

There are a few small pizzas designed for a microwave and they
have to play tricks, like have a piece of metalized cardboard to try
to
crisp up the bottom. It doesn't work well and the one I tried was
also
among the crappiest pizzas for other reasons too.

Again, it's ALREADY cooked and crisped. If you were actually cooking
it, you can turn the grill or oven function on on your microwave
simultaneously.

IDK what kind of crap you have over there, but here, in the USA, frozen
pizza is not cooked. The crust is dough that needs to be baked,
the cheese needs to be melted, etc. I suspect, as usual from past
experience, you're full of shit and pizza in the UK is similar. And
the vast majority of pizza COOKING instructions say to put it in a
regular oven, not a microwave. For obvious reasons.

No, it's pre-cooked,


Nope, only the base is, not the topping.

Quote:
why would I buy a pre-made pizza and still have to do the work myself? If
I wanted a home made pizza, I'd start from scratch.
https://groceries.asda.com/product/thin-crust-pizza/asda-mediterranean-vegetable-extra-thin-crispy-pizza/910000479897


Peeler
Guest

Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:45 pm   



On Thu, 3 Jan 2019 07:29:06 +1100, dkol better known as cantankerous
nym-shifting trolling senile geezer Rot Speed, wrote:

<FLUSH another 164 lines of stinking useless trollshit>

--
"Anonymous" to trolling senile Rot Speed:
"You can fuck off as you know less than pig shit you sad
little ignorant cunt."
MID: <62dcaae57b421e2b3b10e97d9c0ddf08_at_haph.org>

Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Guest

Sun Jan 06, 2019 4:45 pm   



On 1/1/2019 10:26 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:

Quote:

Well they're meant to, but you can see them flickering, especially at the lower quarter of brightness.  Or maybe I have better eyesight than the designers?


You mammy gimme good head.
LOL

FMurtz
Guest

Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:45 pm   



Rod Speed wrote:
Quote:


"FMurtz" <haggisz_at_hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:mPWVD.97866$L44.52153_at_fx07.iad...
87213 wrote:


"William Gothberg" <William_Gothberg_at_internet.co.is> wrote in message
news:op.zusz2vco7uplkq_at_desktop-ga2mpl8.lan...
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 21:23:55 -0000, mike <ham789_at_netzero.net> wrote:

On 12/29/2018 10:16 AM, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:38:04 -0000, Clare Snyder <clare_at_snyder.on.ca
wrote:

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 08:07:42 -0800, Bob F <bobnospam_at_gmail.com
wrote:

On 12/29/2018 6:37 AM, trader_4 wrote:
On Saturday, December 29, 2018 at 9:23:42 AM UTC-5, Bill Gill
wrote:
On 12/29/2018 7:43 AM, William Gothberg wrote:
Shouldn't we have faster microwaves by now giving out a few
kW? They
were invented decades ago.
Higher powered microwaves would require higher powered electric
outlets, probably 220VAC (in the USA).

Also it is questionable whether higher powered ovens would be
practical for use.  Getting warming times down to a couple of
seconds might not be a good idea.  More speed is not always
better.

Bill

+1

That about covers it.  Not sure how useful more power would be.
For
example,
last night I was thawing out a tomato sauce in a quart plastic
container.
The Panasonic has a defrost mode that uses about 30% power and
cycles that.


It gets the 30% power by cycling the 100% power on 30% of the time.

(By the way, adjusting the level does not actually change the
wattage.
It simply means the microwave will pulse on and off at its fixed
wattage
until the desired level is reached.)

https://lifehacker.com/5974788/familiarize-yourself-with-your-microwaves-power-settings-to-make-microwave-cooking-a-joy


 That was true of the first generation of Microwaves, but the
current
"inverter" driver units actually CAN throttle the power. Inverter
microwaves are much better for defrosting AND cooking.

We've had ours for about 2 years now - replacing our original
that we
bought in about 1985.

BIG difference (but the old one would likely still be working by the
time this one dies)

Why is it called an invertor?  I thought an invertor was a device to
increase the voltage - like running 240V devices off a 12V car
battery.

And why on earth would you not want to cook on full power?  I've
never
had a reason to lower the power from the maximum of 800W.  I want the
meal as soon as possible!

There's been a lot of  nitpicking in this thread.

All microwaves reduce power by cycling between 0 and 100% power.
The relative power level is the duty factor of that on/off cycle.

Older microwaves switch the INPUT to the power transformer.
That also runs the filament.  The time to heat up the filament
is the limiting factor in how short you can make the on-time.
You get a minimum of about 10 seconds on-time.
That minimum time is plenty to make food explode.

Better microwaves are called "Inverter" microwaves.
I believe they're all licensed from Panasonic.
When I bought mine, it seemed that all the licensees had
dried up leaving Panasonic as the only locally available units.

It's my understanding that they heat the filament independently
and can have very short on-times.  Duty factor is the same as
the older microwaves, but the on-time can be much shorter.

Foods don't explode on low power like they used to.

Food is not uniform.  The effectiveness of microwaves decreases
as the food thickness increases.  There's a thermal time constant.
So, if you cook at lower average power for longer time,
you can warm the inside without seriously overcooking the outside
or having local boiling that makes food explode.

The minimum on-time really helps with that.  I haven't had food
explode since I got an Inverter microwave.  The defrost cycle
really does work well.

They're slightly more expensive, but it's worth it.

I've never exploded food on a non-invertor microwave.

Try microwaving an egg in its shell sometime.


Do it all the time, for ten seconds for one or two eggs to bring to
room temp from the fridge.

That's not cooking it.

Just noticed that Laucke also have a Super
Soft  bread mix. Have you tried that one ?


I think we have totally different expectations of bread, It is not
entirely flavour (probably texture in my case)and the only way to
explain or resolve would be for you to buy(taking one brand, tiptop the
ONE) (preservative loaded)loaf for instance and for you to replicate it
in your machine.
Trying a slice of the commercial, bearing in mind that it is up to a day
since it came out of the oven then another slice a day later and then
another a day later still, up to three days and see if you can replicate
it with a machine.
My experience is that even as little as a few hours the machine loaf is
like pumpernickle compared with the three day old slice of the
commercial and even 30 minutes after baking it,it is not similar.
The taste may or may not be better in the homemade but not the way I
like my sandwiches



Quote:

Maybe I don't cook thick enough stuff.

Yep, you vegys don't.

Or maybe they should work more on making the microwaves more even so
you don't get so many hotspots.

That's not the problem. The problem is that with something
large like a leg of lamb, the microwaves get absorbed on
the outside so that if you blast it with full power of say 2KW
you will burn the outside and leave the inside uncooked.


Rod Speed
Guest

Mon Jan 07, 2019 6:45 pm   



"FMurtz" <haggisz_at_hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:JSGYD.295712$vH3.218078_at_fx36.iad...
Quote:
Rod Speed wrote:


"FMurtz" <haggisz_at_hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:mPWVD.97866$L44.52153_at_fx07.iad...
87213 wrote:


"William Gothberg" <William_Gothberg_at_internet.co.is> wrote in message
news:op.zusz2vco7uplkq_at_desktop-ga2mpl8.lan...
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 21:23:55 -0000, mike <ham789_at_netzero.net> wrote:

On 12/29/2018 10:16 AM, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:38:04 -0000, Clare Snyder
clare_at_snyder.on.ca
wrote:

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 08:07:42 -0800, Bob F <bobnospam_at_gmail.com
wrote:

On 12/29/2018 6:37 AM, trader_4 wrote:
On Saturday, December 29, 2018 at 9:23:42 AM UTC-5, Bill Gill
wrote:
On 12/29/2018 7:43 AM, William Gothberg wrote:
Shouldn't we have faster microwaves by now giving out a few kW?
They
were invented decades ago.
Higher powered microwaves would require higher powered electric
outlets, probably 220VAC (in the USA).

Also it is questionable whether higher powered ovens would be
practical for use. Getting warming times down to a couple of
seconds might not be a good idea. More speed is not always
better.

Bill

+1

That about covers it. Not sure how useful more power would be.
For
example,
last night I was thawing out a tomato sauce in a quart plastic
container.
The Panasonic has a defrost mode that uses about 30% power and
cycles that.


It gets the 30% power by cycling the 100% power on 30% of the
time.

(By the way, adjusting the level does not actually change the
wattage.
It simply means the microwave will pulse on and off at its fixed
wattage
until the desired level is reached.)

https://lifehacker.com/5974788/familiarize-yourself-with-your-microwaves-power-settings-to-make-microwave-cooking-a-joy

That was true of the first generation of Microwaves, but the
current
"inverter" driver units actually CAN throttle the power. Inverter
microwaves are much better for defrosting AND cooking.

We've had ours for about 2 years now - replacing our original that
we
bought in about 1985.

BIG difference (but the old one would likely still be working by
the
time this one dies)

Why is it called an invertor? I thought an invertor was a device to
increase the voltage - like running 240V devices off a 12V car
battery.

And why on earth would you not want to cook on full power? I've
never
had a reason to lower the power from the maximum of 800W. I want
the
meal as soon as possible!

There's been a lot of nitpicking in this thread.

All microwaves reduce power by cycling between 0 and 100% power.
The relative power level is the duty factor of that on/off cycle.

Older microwaves switch the INPUT to the power transformer.
That also runs the filament. The time to heat up the filament
is the limiting factor in how short you can make the on-time.
You get a minimum of about 10 seconds on-time.
That minimum time is plenty to make food explode.

Better microwaves are called "Inverter" microwaves.
I believe they're all licensed from Panasonic.
When I bought mine, it seemed that all the licensees had
dried up leaving Panasonic as the only locally available units.

It's my understanding that they heat the filament independently
and can have very short on-times. Duty factor is the same as
the older microwaves, but the on-time can be much shorter.

Foods don't explode on low power like they used to.

Food is not uniform. The effectiveness of microwaves decreases
as the food thickness increases. There's a thermal time constant.
So, if you cook at lower average power for longer time,
you can warm the inside without seriously overcooking the outside
or having local boiling that makes food explode.

The minimum on-time really helps with that. I haven't had food
explode since I got an Inverter microwave. The defrost cycle
really does work well.

They're slightly more expensive, but it's worth it.

I've never exploded food on a non-invertor microwave.

Try microwaving an egg in its shell sometime.


Do it all the time, for ten seconds for one or two eggs to bring to room
temp from the fridge.

That's not cooking it.

Just noticed that Laucke also have a Super
Soft bread mix. Have you tried that one ?

I think we have totally different expectations of bread,


Yes, I have never liked very soft tasteless Chorleywood shit.

> It is not entirely flavour (probably texture in my case)

Is that because you don't have any viable teeth left ?

Quote:
and the only way to explain or resolve would be for you to buy(taking one
brand, tiptop the ONE) (preservative loaded)loaf for instance and for you
to replicate it in your machine.

Trying a slice of the commercial, bearing in mind that it is up to a day
since it came out of the oven then another slice a day later and then
another a day later still, up to three days and see if you can replicate
it with a machine.


Wouldn't want to, don't like that sort of bread.

Quote:
My experience is that even as little as a few hours the machine loaf is
like pumpernickle compared with the three day old slice of the commercial
and even 30 minutes after baking it,it is not similar. The taste may or
may not be better in the homemade but not the way I like my sandwiches


But given that you do prefer super soft bread, that breadmix
may be worth trying given that it is presumably made for
those who like very soft white bread.

The other odd effect I have seen since the original is that
I started to keep the bread in the fridge. I don't normally
do that but did notice that on the last day in the 4 day
cycle, the last slice was a bit mouldy when the loaf was
not left in the fridge, in summer. So I started to keep the
loaf in the fridge and that stopped it going mouldy but
does make the loaf much more solid, even just overnight.
I've never seen that mouldy effect in the 10 years or so
I have been using the bread machine and have no just
finished that 10KG sack so will have to see if the
mouldy effect is still there with the new 5KG sack.

Quote:
Maybe I don't cook thick enough stuff.

Yep, you vegys don't.

Or maybe they should work more on making the microwaves more even so
you don't get so many hotspots.

That's not the problem. The problem is that with something
large like a leg of lamb, the microwaves get absorbed on
the outside so that if you blast it with full power of say 2KW
you will burn the outside and leave the inside uncooked.



Commander Kinsey
Guest

Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:45 pm   



On Sun, 06 Jan 2019 15:27:25 -0000, Colonel Edmund J. Burke <burkesbabes_at_bigass-babes.com> wrote:

Quote:
On 1/1/2019 10:26 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:


Well they're meant to, but you can see them flickering, especially at the lower quarter of brightness. Or maybe I have better eyesight than the designers?


You mammy gimme good head.
LOL


I doubt it, aren't you a transvestite?

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