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Commander Kinsey
Guest

Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:45 pm   



On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:57:16 -0000, Mark Lloyd <not_at_mail.invalid> wrote:

Quote:
On 12/30/18 6:15 PM, William Gothberg wrote:

[snip]

Isn't it illegal to change your meter without permission?

There was no permission (or even notification) when they changed mine
(from mechanical to LCD readout, probably with remote reading). Just the
power went off (at about 10 AM IIRC) for a couple of minutes. When it
came back on, there was a new meter.


Land of the free my ass. And you guys also have rules imposed by the postal service, oh my god! What happened to your capitalism?

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:45 pm   



On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 11:34:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:24:35 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:20:18 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 12:16:27 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 10:21:46 -0000, Max Demian <max_demian_at_bigfoot.com> wrote:

On 30/12/2018 03:18, Bill Wright wrote:
On 29/12/2018 17:35, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:15:05 -0000, Bill Wright
wrightsaerials_at_f2s.com> wrote:

On 29/12/2018 16:27, William Gothberg wrote:

It can take 5 minutes to warm something from frozen to eating
temperature. I see no reason that couldn't be made into 2 minutes.

Conduction

Which would be way faster if the water content the microwaves were
hitting was heated hotter.

But the difference in temp between the outside and the inside of the
food would be greater and this could result in food that was both over-
and under-cooked. This is why microwave ovens have low settings, so food
can cook slowly and evenly. Anyone who uses a microwave a lot will be
well aware of this. For items where convection can assist conduction
higher power can be fine, but not for large solid lumps of food.

I can't say many things I cook have large solid lumps. All ready meals are pretty much fluid, so convection and conduction can take place, and almost everything I cook is a dish of something which is only 2 inches deep.

I don't know what the low settings are for. All the instructions I've
seen - e.g. on ready meals - say "full power". There is the defrost
setting, but microwaves aren't very good at defrosting as they don't
heat frozen water very well.

Mine thaws a frozen (already cooked) pizza extremely well, on full power. It turns a -20C pizza into a +40C pizza in 4 minutes.

Only a moron would cook a pizza in a microwave.

No, anyone who wants it ready more quickly. I buy the frozen pizza in the supermarket, place it in the microwave, then I can eat it in 4 minutes.

Why would you think pizzas shouldn't go in microwaves?! Every foodstuff can be cooked in a microwave.

Because some of us are more interested in good results than in speed.

When I want pizza, I make the crust from scratch, wait for it to rise,
shape it, top it, and bake it at 550 F.


And your stomach is happy to wait?!

dkol
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 5:45 am   



"Commander Kinsey" <CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote in message
news:op.zuwrwhddwdg98l_at_desktop-ga2mpl8.lan...
Quote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 11:34:40 -0000, <angelicapaganelli_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:24:35 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:20:18 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net
wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 12:16:27 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg
wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 10:21:46 -0000, Max Demian
max_demian_at_bigfoot.com> wrote:

On 30/12/2018 03:18, Bill Wright wrote:
On 29/12/2018 17:35, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:15:05 -0000, Bill Wright
wrightsaerials_at_f2s.com> wrote:

On 29/12/2018 16:27, William Gothberg wrote:

It can take 5 minutes to warm something from frozen to eating
temperature. I see no reason that couldn't be made into 2
minutes.

Conduction

Which would be way faster if the water content the microwaves
were
hitting was heated hotter.

But the difference in temp between the outside and the inside of
the
food would be greater and this could result in food that was both
over-
and under-cooked. This is why microwave ovens have low settings,
so food
can cook slowly and evenly. Anyone who uses a microwave a lot will
be
well aware of this. For items where convection can assist
conduction
higher power can be fine, but not for large solid lumps of food.

I can't say many things I cook have large solid lumps. All ready
meals are pretty much fluid, so convection and conduction can take
place, and almost everything I cook is a dish of something which is
only 2 inches deep.

I don't know what the low settings are for. All the instructions
I've
seen - e.g. on ready meals - say "full power". There is the defrost
setting, but microwaves aren't very good at defrosting as they
don't
heat frozen water very well.

Mine thaws a frozen (already cooked) pizza extremely well, on full
power. It turns a -20C pizza into a +40C pizza in 4 minutes.

Only a moron would cook a pizza in a microwave.

No, anyone who wants it ready more quickly. I buy the frozen pizza in
the supermarket, place it in the microwave, then I can eat it in 4
minutes.

Why would you think pizzas shouldn't go in microwaves?! Every foodstuff
can be cooked in a microwave.

Because some of us are more interested in good results than in speed.

When I want pizza, I make the crust from scratch, wait for it to rise,
shape it, top it, and bake it at 550 F.

And your stomach is happy to wait?!


We arent all silly little kids stamping their foot and demanding what they
want right now.

Peeler
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 12:45 pm   



On Tue, 1 Jan 2019 15:35:40 +1100, dkol, better known as cantankerous
nym-shifting trolling senile geezer Rot Speed, wrote:


Quote:

We arent all silly little kids stamping their foot and demanding what they
want right now.


YOU are silly senile little old fart that keeps trolling on Usenet like some
maladjusted mentally disturbed youngster!

--
Richard addressing Rot Speed:
"Shit you're thick/pathetic excuse for a troll."
MID: <ogoa38$pul$1_at_news.mixmin.net>

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:45 pm   



On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 07:18:44 -0000, Diesel <nobody_at_haph.org> wrote:

Quote:
Arthur Conan Doyle <dont_at_bother.com
news:n1ff2el7b5fc6megbeihv069t05gouso10_at_None Sat, 29 Dec 2018
18:27:21 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

"William Gothberg" <William_Gothberg_at_internet.co.is> wrote:

Why is it called an invertor?

Typical microwaves use fixed AC power to drive the magnetron.
Inverter driven magnetrons use DC power, which can be variable.


Wrong.

Both styles actually take AC incoming mains, raise it to 5k or so,
and convert it with a single diode mind you, to DC to feed the
magnetron. The filament is fed by low voltage AC. Neither of them can
or do vary the voltage going to the magnetron. That's just not how it
works. You can't lower the voltage to reduce microwave energy. And
you can't raise it to get more microwave energy, either. The
magnetron requires voltage within a certain range to function. More
than that will burn the magnetron up. Less will prevent it from
making viable microwaves.


So what we need is a bigger fucking magnetron. More power! Get one from Binford!

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:45 pm   



On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 15:12:23 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 9:43:22 AM UTC-5, Max Demian wrote:
On 31/12/2018 07:18, Diesel wrote:
Arthur Conan Doyle <dont_at_bother.com
news:n1ff2el7b5fc6megbeihv069t05gouso10_at_None Sat, 29 Dec 2018
18:27:21 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

"William Gothberg" <William_Gothberg_at_internet.co.is> wrote:

Why is it called an invertor?

Typical microwaves use fixed AC power to drive the magnetron.
Inverter driven magnetrons use DC power, which can be variable.

Wrong.

Both styles actually take AC incoming mains, raise it to 5k or so,
and convert it with a single diode mind you, to DC to feed the
magnetron. The filament is fed by low voltage AC. Neither of them can
or do vary the voltage going to the magnetron. That's just not how it
works. You can't lower the voltage to reduce microwave energy. And
you can't raise it to get more microwave energy, either. The
magnetron requires voltage within a certain range to function. More
than that will burn the magnetron up. Less will prevent it from
making viable microwaves.

So what is the difference between inverter and non inverter types? Is
'inverter' an appropriate term? How do either control the power?

He abundantly and mostly correctly explained that in his previous post,
including the one you copied. The inverter type still pulse the magnetron,
just at a very fast rate, so that for all practical purposes, it's
like being continuous. It's like dimming a 100W bulb. If you turn it
on and off half the time in 1 second cycle times, you will see it blinking.
If you do that with a very fast cycle time you will see a dimmed but
continuous light. That's how bulb dimmers work too.


Well they're meant to, but you can see them flickering, especially at the lower quarter of brightness. Or maybe I have better eyesight than the designers?

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:45 pm   



On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 07:18:43 -0000, Diesel <nobody_at_haph.org> wrote:

Quote:
"William Gothberg" <William_Gothberg_at_internet.co.is
news:op.zusqdvwu7uplkq_at_desktop-ga2mpl8.lan Sat, 29 Dec 2018 18:16:33
GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:38:04 -0000, Clare Snyder
clare_at_snyder.on.ca> wrote:

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 08:07:42 -0800, Bob F <bobnospam_at_gmail.com
wrote:

On 12/29/2018 6:37 AM, trader_4 wrote:
On Saturday, December 29, 2018 at 9:23:42 AM UTC-5, Bill Gill
wrote:
On 12/29/2018 7:43 AM, William Gothberg wrote:
Shouldn't we have faster microwaves by now giving out a few
kW? They were invented decades ago.
Higher powered microwaves would require higher powered
electric outlets, probably 220VAC (in the USA).

Also it is questionable whether higher powered ovens would be
practical for use. Getting warming times down to a couple of
seconds might not be a good idea. More speed is not always
better.

Bill

+1

That about covers it. Not sure how useful more power would be.
For example, last night I was thawing out a tomato sauce in a
quart plastic container. The Panasonic has a defrost mode that
uses about 30% power and cycles that.


It gets the 30% power by cycling the 100% power on 30% of the
time.

(By the way, adjusting the level does not actually change the
wattage. It simply means the microwave will pulse on and off at
its fixed wattage until the desired level is reached.)

https://lifehacker.com/5974788/familiarize-yourself-with-your-mic
rowaves-power-settings-to-make-microwave-cooking-a-joy
That was true of the first generation of Microwaves, but the
current
"inverter" driver units actually CAN throttle the power. Inverter
microwaves are much better for defrosting AND cooking.

We've had ours for about 2 years now - replacing our original
that we bought in about 1985.

BIG difference (but the old one would likely still be working by
the time this one dies)

Why is it called an invertor? I thought an invertor was a device
to increase the voltage - like running 240V devices off a 12V car
battery.

It's actually a switching power supply, instead of the old heavy step
up transformer, diode and capacitor system. And contrary to the other
posters reply, there 'inverter' style microwave is NOT throttling the
power going to the magnetron. It's still getting high voltage DC
current, just like the original ones. It's better able to control the
timing period for magnetron on/off cycles as well as independent
control over the magnetrons required filament. the old step up
transformer style fired the element with another tap on the
secondary. so, if the transformer had power, both the filament and
magnetron do too. No way to seperate them in that design.


Why could they not be switched independantly after the stepup transformer?

Quote:
And why on earth would you not want to cook on full power? I've
never had a reason to lower the power from the maximum of 800W. I
want the meal as soon as possible!

You aren't lowering or raising the power to your magnetron when you
adjust those cooking settings. All you're actually doing is telling
the microwaves computer how long to leave the magnetron on for. Ie:
how fast does it cycle the magnetrons power state. For the old heavy
ones, non 'inverter', it's opening/closing a single pole relay that
controls the input on the primary coil to the step up transformer.
Your 'cooking' settings determine how long that relay stays open and
closes for. That's all. Anytime it's closed, your magnetron (in your
case) is kicking 800watts of microwave energy. You can't adjust that.
What you can adjust is how long it's firing the energy into the
cooking chamber.


Yes I know that. But however it lowers the total cooking power, I've never felt the need to use less than all of it. Just as when I drive a car, I only lift my foot off the floor for a corner or a slow woman driver in front of me.

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:45 pm   



On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 14:04:24 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 2:18:47 AM UTC-5, Diesel wrote:
"William Gothberg" <William_Gothberg_at_internet.co.is
news:op.zusqdvwu7uplkq_at_desktop-ga2mpl8.lan Sat, 29 Dec 2018 18:16:33
GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:38:04 -0000, Clare Snyder
clare_at_snyder.on.ca> wrote:

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 08:07:42 -0800, Bob F <bobnospam_at_gmail.com
wrote:

On 12/29/2018 6:37 AM, trader_4 wrote:
On Saturday, December 29, 2018 at 9:23:42 AM UTC-5, Bill Gill
wrote:
On 12/29/2018 7:43 AM, William Gothberg wrote:
Shouldn't we have faster microwaves by now giving out a few
kW? They were invented decades ago.
Higher powered microwaves would require higher powered
electric outlets, probably 220VAC (in the USA).

Also it is questionable whether higher powered ovens would be
practical for use. Getting warming times down to a couple of
seconds might not be a good idea. More speed is not always
better.

Bill

+1

That about covers it. Not sure how useful more power would be.
For example, last night I was thawing out a tomato sauce in a
quart plastic container. The Panasonic has a defrost mode that
uses about 30% power and cycles that.


It gets the 30% power by cycling the 100% power on 30% of the
time.

(By the way, adjusting the level does not actually change the
wattage. It simply means the microwave will pulse on and off at
its fixed wattage until the desired level is reached.)

https://lifehacker.com/5974788/familiarize-yourself-with-your-mic
rowaves-power-settings-to-make-microwave-cooking-a-joy
That was true of the first generation of Microwaves, but the
current
"inverter" driver units actually CAN throttle the power. Inverter
microwaves are much better for defrosting AND cooking.

We've had ours for about 2 years now - replacing our original
that we bought in about 1985.

BIG difference (but the old one would likely still be working by
the time this one dies)

Why is it called an invertor? I thought an invertor was a device
to increase the voltage - like running 240V devices off a 12V car
battery.

It's actually a switching power supply, instead of the old heavy step
up transformer, diode and capacitor system. And contrary to the other
posters reply, there 'inverter' style microwave is NOT throttling the
power going to the magnetron. It's still getting high voltage DC
current, just like the original ones. It's better able to control the
timing period for magnetron on/off cycles as well as independent
control over the magnetrons required filament. the old step up
transformer style fired the element with another tap on the
secondary. so, if the transformer had power, both the filament and
magnetron do too. No way to seperate them in that design.

And why on earth would you not want to cook on full power? I've
never had a reason to lower the power from the maximum of 800W. I
want the meal as soon as possible!

You aren't lowering or raising the power to your magnetron when you
adjust those cooking settings. All you're actually doing is telling
the microwaves computer how long to leave the magnetron on for. Ie:
how fast does it cycle the magnetrons power state. For the old heavy
ones, non 'inverter', it's opening/closing a single pole relay that
controls the input on the primary coil to the step up transformer.
Your 'cooking' settings determine how long that relay stays open and
closes for. That's all. Anytime it's closed, your magnetron (in your
case) is kicking 800watts of microwave energy. You can't adjust that.
What you can adjust is how long it's firing the energy into the
cooking chamber.

Which is in fact changing the power input to the magnetron and the power
output of the magnetron. It's like a 100W bulb on a dimmer. I set the
dimmer to 50%, is the dimmer still delivering 100W? Is the bulb still
putting out 100W? No, it's now 50W.


Not really true with the old microwaves where the on/off cycle was every 10 seconds! All that does is make the food hot then warm then hot then warm, not very good I would have thought.

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:45 pm   



On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 18:31:52 -0000, Meanie <Me_at_gmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
On 12/31/2018 1:28 PM, William Gothberg wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 03:48:02 -0000, Meanie <Me_at_gmail.com> wrote:

On 12/30/2018 7:17 PM, William Gothberg wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 00:11:44 -0000, Meanie <Me_at_gmail.com> wrote:

On 12/30/2018 12:44 PM, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 17:28:31 -0000, Meanie <Me_at_gmail.com> wrote:

On 12/30/2018 12:09 PM, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 03:09:29 -0000, FMurtz <haggisz_at_hotmail.com
wrote:

William Gothberg wrote:
On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:38:04 -0000, Clare Snyder
clare_at_snyder.on.ca
wrote:

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 08:07:42 -0800, Bob F <bobnospam_at_gmail.com
wrote:

On 12/29/2018 6:37 AM, trader_4 wrote:
On Saturday, December 29, 2018 at 9:23:42 AM UTC-5, Bill Gill
wrote:
On 12/29/2018 7:43 AM, William Gothberg wrote:
Shouldn't we have faster microwaves by now giving out a
few kW?
They
were invented decades ago.
Higher powered microwaves would require higher powered
electric
outlets, probably 220VAC (in the USA).

Also it is questionable whether higher powered ovens would be
practical for use. Getting warming times down to a couple of
seconds might not be a good idea. More speed is not always
better.

Bill

+1

That about covers it. Not sure how useful more power would be.
For
example,
last night I was thawing out a tomato sauce in a quart plastic
container.
The Panasonic has a defrost mode that uses about 30% power and
cycles that.


It gets the 30% power by cycling the 100% power on 30% of the
time.

(By the way, adjusting the level does not actually change the
wattage.
It simply means the microwave will pulse on and off at its fixed
wattage
until the desired level is reached.)

https://lifehacker.com/5974788/familiarize-yourself-with-your-microwaves-power-settings-to-make-microwave-cooking-a-joy





That was true of the first generation of Microwaves, but the
current
"inverter" driver units actually CAN throttle the power. Inverter
microwaves are much better for defrosting AND cooking.

We've had ours for about 2 years now - replacing our original
that we
bought in about 1985.

BIG difference (but the old one would likely still be working by
the
time this one dies)

Why is it called an invertor? I thought an invertor was a
device to
increase the voltage - like running 240V devices off a 12V car
battery.

Why do you persist in posting waffle about which you know
absolutely
nothing, twould be better to post on subjects you know or ask and
educate yourself about the other

I know what a fucking invertor is, I built my own solar panel
system.

LMFAO! There it is again. Nobody else brags about you therefore, brag
about yourself when nobody asked. LMFAO! Pathetic wanker.

I wasn't bragging, I was stating I know how inverters work. Why on
earth would you see that as bragging? You have some weird mental
problem.


It's simple....
beginning of sentence> "I know how inverters work." <end of sentence

See that? No requirement of why or bragging about an accomplishment. I
simply stated I know how they work. If required, you could explain the
process of the inverter without stating you built something. But not
you.... you do man! LMFAO!

I know, we all have weird mental problems because you say so. You're
the
best!

I backed up my reasoning as yo why I know how they work. Why you see
that as bragging, nobody knows.


LMFAO! Pathetic wanker.

You're not very good at comprehending English are you? I have built a
solar power system using invertors by myself. Therefore I know what an
invertor is and how it works. That is a statement of fact, not bragging.

LMFAO! Pathetic wanker.


You have the same little intelligence as Rod Speed and Steve Pounder. Try responding with a sentence instead of an insult I'd see from a 6 year old.
Not sure why I'm trying to have a discussion about something technical with a woman anyway.

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:45 pm   



On Tue, 01 Jan 2019 18:31:21 -0000, Murmansk <stainburn_at_gmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Saturday, 29 December 2018 13:43:13 UTC, William Gothberg wrote:
Shouldn't we have faster microwaves by now giving out a few kW? They were invented decades ago.

I bought a small apple tart at a stall at Manchester Airport the other day and the assistant said she was going to put it in the oven for 3 seconds. I asked how powerful the oven was and she said 1,900 watts. My tart was certainly warm - I didn't observe exactly how long she gave it!


Exactly, more power, less time.

dkol
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:45 pm   



"Commander Kinsey" <CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote in message
news:op.zuyajby3wdg98l_at_desktop-ga2mpl8.lan...
Quote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 07:18:43 -0000, Diesel <nobody_at_haph.org> wrote:

"William Gothberg" <William_Gothberg_at_internet.co.is
news:op.zusqdvwu7uplkq_at_desktop-ga2mpl8.lan Sat, 29 Dec 2018 18:16:33
GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:38:04 -0000, Clare Snyder
clare_at_snyder.on.ca> wrote:

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 08:07:42 -0800, Bob F <bobnospam_at_gmail.com
wrote:

On 12/29/2018 6:37 AM, trader_4 wrote:
On Saturday, December 29, 2018 at 9:23:42 AM UTC-5, Bill Gill
wrote:
On 12/29/2018 7:43 AM, William Gothberg wrote:
Shouldn't we have faster microwaves by now giving out a few
kW? They were invented decades ago.
Higher powered microwaves would require higher powered
electric outlets, probably 220VAC (in the USA).

Also it is questionable whether higher powered ovens would be
practical for use. Getting warming times down to a couple of
seconds might not be a good idea. More speed is not always
better.

Bill

+1

That about covers it. Not sure how useful more power would be.
For example, last night I was thawing out a tomato sauce in a
quart plastic container. The Panasonic has a defrost mode that
uses about 30% power and cycles that.


It gets the 30% power by cycling the 100% power on 30% of the
time.

(By the way, adjusting the level does not actually change the
wattage. It simply means the microwave will pulse on and off at
its fixed wattage until the desired level is reached.)

https://lifehacker.com/5974788/familiarize-yourself-with-your-mic
rowaves-power-settings-to-make-microwave-cooking-a-joy
That was true of the first generation of Microwaves, but the
current
"inverter" driver units actually CAN throttle the power. Inverter
microwaves are much better for defrosting AND cooking.

We've had ours for about 2 years now - replacing our original
that we bought in about 1985.

BIG difference (but the old one would likely still be working by
the time this one dies)

Why is it called an invertor? I thought an invertor was a device
to increase the voltage - like running 240V devices off a 12V car
battery.

It's actually a switching power supply, instead of the old heavy step
up transformer, diode and capacitor system. And contrary to the other
posters reply, there 'inverter' style microwave is NOT throttling the
power going to the magnetron. It's still getting high voltage DC
current, just like the original ones. It's better able to control the
timing period for magnetron on/off cycles as well as independent
control over the magnetrons required filament. the old step up
transformer style fired the element with another tap on the
secondary. so, if the transformer had power, both the filament and
magnetron do too. No way to seperate them in that design.

Why could they not be switched independantly after the stepup transformer?

And why on earth would you not want to cook on full power? I've
never had a reason to lower the power from the maximum of 800W. I
want the meal as soon as possible!

You aren't lowering or raising the power to your magnetron when you
adjust those cooking settings. All you're actually doing is telling
the microwaves computer how long to leave the magnetron on for. Ie:
how fast does it cycle the magnetrons power state. For the old heavy
ones, non 'inverter', it's opening/closing a single pole relay that
controls the input on the primary coil to the step up transformer.
Your 'cooking' settings determine how long that relay stays open and
closes for. That's all. Anytime it's closed, your magnetron (in your
case) is kicking 800watts of microwave energy. You can't adjust that.
What you can adjust is how long it's firing the energy into the
cooking chamber.

Yes I know that. But however it lowers the total cooking power, I've
never felt the need to use less than all of it.


Yes, you actually are that stupid.

Quote:
Just as when I drive a car, I only lift my foot off the floor for a corner
or a slow woman driver in front of me.


Yes, you actually are that stupid.

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:45 pm   



On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 20:49:18 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 3:36:05 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 13:29:15 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:

On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:22:52 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:16:33 -0000, Mark Lloyd <not_at_mail.invalid> wrote:

On 12/29/18 12:52 PM, William Gothberg wrote:

[snip]

Microwaving something in a cheap shit plastic container is insane. I
always cook or eat things in a real pot bowl. Plastic melts!

The first thing I heated in a microwave was frozen macaroni and cheese.
The instructions said to cover it in plastic wrap. It didn't take me
long to figure out that it was a really bad idea, consider trying to
separate melted plastic from melted cheese.

Indeed, that cheap shit plastic melts in a 700W microwave oven. Or in any microwave oven, it can't handle boiling water, which inevitably you get from the food. And I bet it's rather toxic.

Which is why when DEFROSTING something that's in a plastic container you
use the DEFROST cycle that uses low power and then cycles even that after
about 75 secs.

I'm not talking about defrosting. I've bought ready meals which are sat at room or fridge temperature, they go in the microwave to heat and the plastic melts.

You've said you just use yours for cooking pre-made
frozen dinners and the like, which is crap I wouldn't even eat.

It's more tasty and quicker to make :-)

Others here use microwaves for other uses, including defrosting raw foods that
you don't want to cook in the microwave. I gave you an example, pork chops.
I want them DEFROSTED, not cooked. Once DEFROSTED, I can then brine them,
marinate them, grill them, so what I would with any fresh pork chops.

What a palava. We invented ready meals for a reason.

Or defrosting tomato sauce that in a plastic container. I want the sauce
DEFROSTED, not a melted container. I suppose I should only freeze foods
in ceramic bowls that go in a microwave?

You take them out of the container they were in dumbass.

You can't get most frozen food, like sauce, out of a one quart plastic container until
it's at least partially defrosted moron. You wouldn't even know, because
you apparently don't prepare and then freeze food in those kinds of containers.


I don't freeze things in stupid containers, no.

Quote:
You're living off pre-cooked, TV dinner crap. Anyone that makes a post
saying there is no reason not to cook pizza in a microwave has already
said way more than enough about their knowledge of food and cooking.
We have a show here you could be on, Worst Cooks in America.


You carry on wasting your time if you like, I have hobbies and other things I prefer to do than fucking about making food. Food is a fuel, if it tastes nice and gives me energy, that's fine, then I can get on with my life.

And fix your newsreader, why is it allergic to crossposts? You're breaking the conversation into four parts moron.

dkol
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:45 pm   



"Commander Kinsey" <CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote in message
news:op.zuyalgnjwdg98l_at_desktop-ga2mpl8.lan...
Quote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 14:04:24 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net
wrote:

On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 2:18:47 AM UTC-5, Diesel wrote:
"William Gothberg" <William_Gothberg_at_internet.co.is
news:op.zusqdvwu7uplkq_at_desktop-ga2mpl8.lan Sat, 29 Dec 2018 18:16:33
GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 17:38:04 -0000, Clare Snyder
clare_at_snyder.on.ca> wrote:

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 08:07:42 -0800, Bob F <bobnospam_at_gmail.com
wrote:

On 12/29/2018 6:37 AM, trader_4 wrote:
On Saturday, December 29, 2018 at 9:23:42 AM UTC-5, Bill Gill
wrote:
On 12/29/2018 7:43 AM, William Gothberg wrote:
Shouldn't we have faster microwaves by now giving out a few
kW? They were invented decades ago.
Higher powered microwaves would require higher powered
electric outlets, probably 220VAC (in the USA).

Also it is questionable whether higher powered ovens would be
practical for use. Getting warming times down to a couple of
seconds might not be a good idea. More speed is not always
better.

Bill

+1

That about covers it. Not sure how useful more power would be.
For example, last night I was thawing out a tomato sauce in a
quart plastic container. The Panasonic has a defrost mode that
uses about 30% power and cycles that.


It gets the 30% power by cycling the 100% power on 30% of the
time.

(By the way, adjusting the level does not actually change the
wattage. It simply means the microwave will pulse on and off at
its fixed wattage until the desired level is reached.)

https://lifehacker.com/5974788/familiarize-yourself-with-your-mic
rowaves-power-settings-to-make-microwave-cooking-a-joy
That was true of the first generation of Microwaves, but the
current
"inverter" driver units actually CAN throttle the power. Inverter
microwaves are much better for defrosting AND cooking.

We've had ours for about 2 years now - replacing our original
that we bought in about 1985.

BIG difference (but the old one would likely still be working by
the time this one dies)

Why is it called an invertor? I thought an invertor was a device
to increase the voltage - like running 240V devices off a 12V car
battery.

It's actually a switching power supply, instead of the old heavy step
up transformer, diode and capacitor system. And contrary to the other
posters reply, there 'inverter' style microwave is NOT throttling the
power going to the magnetron. It's still getting high voltage DC
current, just like the original ones. It's better able to control the
timing period for magnetron on/off cycles as well as independent
control over the magnetrons required filament. the old step up
transformer style fired the element with another tap on the
secondary. so, if the transformer had power, both the filament and
magnetron do too. No way to seperate them in that design.

And why on earth would you not want to cook on full power? I've
never had a reason to lower the power from the maximum of 800W. I
want the meal as soon as possible!

You aren't lowering or raising the power to your magnetron when you
adjust those cooking settings. All you're actually doing is telling
the microwaves computer how long to leave the magnetron on for. Ie:
how fast does it cycle the magnetrons power state. For the old heavy
ones, non 'inverter', it's opening/closing a single pole relay that
controls the input on the primary coil to the step up transformer.
Your 'cooking' settings determine how long that relay stays open and
closes for. That's all. Anytime it's closed, your magnetron (in your
case) is kicking 800watts of microwave energy. You can't adjust that.
What you can adjust is how long it's firing the energy into the
cooking chamber.

Which is in fact changing the power input to the magnetron and the power
output of the magnetron. It's like a 100W bulb on a dimmer. I set the
dimmer to 50%, is the dimmer still delivering 100W? Is the bulb still
putting out 100W? No, it's now 50W.

Not really true with the old microwaves where the on/off cycle was every
10 seconds! All that does is make the food hot then warm then hot then
warm, not very good I would have thought.


Yes, you actually are that pig ignorant.

It allows more time for the heat to move from the
outer layer of a big chunk of stuff like with a leg
of lamb or quart of something you are defrosting
to the inside where the microwaves don't get to.

Peeler
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:45 pm   



On Wed, 2 Jan 2019 06:58:28 +1100, dkol, better known as cantankerous
nym-shifting trolling senile geezer Rot Speed, wrote:

<FLUSH another 104 lines of stinking trollshit>

....and much better air in here again!

--
MrTurnip_at_down.the.farm about senile Rot Speed:
"This is like having a conversation with someone with brain damage."
MID: <ps10v9$uo2$1_at_gioia.aioe.org>

Mr Pounder Esquire
Guest

Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:45 pm   



Commander Kinsey wrote:
Quote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 20:49:18 -0000, trader_4 <trader4_at_optonline.net
wrote:
On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 3:36:05 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg
wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 13:29:15 -0000, trader_4
trader4_at_optonline.net> wrote:
On Sunday, December 30, 2018 at 3:22:52 PM UTC-5, William Gothberg
wrote:
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 20:16:33 -0000, Mark Lloyd <not_at_mail.invalid
wrote:
On 12/29/18 12:52 PM, William Gothberg wrote:

[snip]

Microwaving something in a cheap shit plastic container is
insane. I always cook or eat things in a real pot bowl. Plastic
melts!

The first thing I heated in a microwave was frozen macaroni and
cheese. The instructions said to cover it in plastic wrap. It
didn't take me long to figure out that it was a really bad idea,
consider trying to separate melted plastic from melted cheese.

Indeed, that cheap shit plastic melts in a 700W microwave oven. Or in
any microwave oven, it can't handle boiling water, which
inevitably you get from the food. And I bet it's rather toxic.

Which is why when DEFROSTING something that's in a plastic
container you use the DEFROST cycle that uses low power and then cycles
even
that after about 75 secs.

I'm not talking about defrosting. I've bought ready meals which
are sat at room or fridge temperature, they go in the microwave to
heat and the plastic melts.
You've said you just use yours for cooking pre-made
frozen dinners and the like, which is crap I wouldn't even eat.

It's more tasty and quicker to make :-)

Others here use microwaves for other uses, including defrosting
raw foods that you don't want to cook in the microwave. I gave
you an example, pork chops. I want them DEFROSTED, not cooked. Once
DEFROSTED, I can then brine them, marinate them, grill them,
so what I would with any fresh pork chops.

What a palava. We invented ready meals for a reason.

Or defrosting tomato sauce that in a plastic container. I want
the sauce DEFROSTED, not a melted container. I suppose I should
only freeze foods in ceramic bowls that go in a microwave?

You take them out of the container they were in dumbass.

You can't get most frozen food, like sauce, out of a one quart
plastic container until it's at least partially defrosted moron. You
wouldn't even know, because you apparently don't prepare and then freeze
food in those kinds of
containers.

I don't freeze things in stupid containers, no.

You're living off pre-cooked, TV dinner crap. Anyone that makes a
post saying there is no reason not to cook pizza in a microwave has
already said way more than enough about their knowledge of food and
cooking.
We have a show here you could be on, Worst Cooks in America.

You carry on wasting your time if you like, I have hobbies and other
things I prefer to do than fucking about making food. Food is a
fuel, if it tastes nice and gives me energy, that's fine, then I can
get on with my life.
And fix your newsreader, why is it allergic to crossposts? You're
breaking the conversation into four parts moron.


Prick.

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