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[off topic] Glow in the dark alarm clock

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NT
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:48 am   



On Mar 23, 3:31 pm, Bernard Peek <b...@shrdlu.com> wrote:
Quote:
On 23/03/10 14:35, TMC wrote:

"Esco" <inva...@nospaml.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9D449240A9D945D4AM2_at_newsfarm.ams2.highwinds-media.com...
Where can I get a battery alarm clock which has hands that can be read in
the dark?

Argos £2.50

Extravagant! I'd check Poundland first.

Don't... just don't.


NT

Don Klipstein
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 2:13 am   



In article <hob0iv$ip9$1_at_news.eternal-september.org>, Frank wrote:
Quote:
On 3/23/2010 12:36 PM, Dave Liquorice wrote:
On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 15:57:02 +0000, Mike Barnes wrote:

The clock I bought recently has some kind of fluorescent paint that
glows green for a short while after the light goes out, but not long
enough to be of much use.

The non-radioactive paints need "charging up" with decent light, kept
in room with the curtains closed or only brief artifical light source
they are dim. The best way to charge up these paints is with a UV
light source, say a bank note light or one for making the invisible
security pens visible.

There are still radio active glow in the dark things in the market.
Mostly emergency signs and the like, they use tritium IIRC rather
than radium.

There are alarm clocks with tritium dials. Did not google far but they
look pricey:

http://www.gemday.com/item0817.htm

Beta particles from nuclear decay are harmless.

Not completely. Bad if source is ingested, bad if source is inhaled in
form of anything that sticks in lungs or is absorbed into the body from
lungs. OK if in a closed container and low energy, as is the case with
tritium.

--
- Don Klipstein (don_at_misty.com)

HeyBub
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:23 am   



Esco wrote:
Quote:
Where can I get a battery alarm clock which has hands that can be
read in the dark?

When all else fails, use the Harbor Freight free flashlight...

jeff_wisnia
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 4:37 am   



Frank wrote:
Quote:
On 3/23/2010 8:13 PM, Don Klipstein wrote:

In article<hob0iv$ip9$1_at_news.eternal-september.org>, Frank wrote:

On 3/23/2010 12:36 PM, Dave Liquorice wrote:

On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 15:57:02 +0000, Mike Barnes wrote:

The clock I bought recently has some kind of fluorescent paint that
glows green for a short while after the light goes out, but not long
enough to be of much use.


The non-radioactive paints need "charging up" with decent light, kept
in room with the curtains closed or only brief artifical light source
they are dim. The best way to charge up these paints is with a UV
light source, say a bank note light or one for making the invisible
security pens visible.

There are still radio active glow in the dark things in the market.
Mostly emergency signs and the like, they use tritium IIRC rather
than radium.

There are alarm clocks with tritium dials. Did not google far but they
look pricey:

http://www.gemday.com/item0817.htm

Beta particles from nuclear decay are harmless.


Not completely. Bad if source is ingested, bad if source is
inhaled in
form of anything that sticks in lungs or is absorbed into the body from
lungs. OK if in a closed container and low energy, as is the case with
tritium.

Yes but unlikely and does not compare to the old radium dials that
caused cancer to the women painting them on.

That probably wouldn't have happened as much is the ladies weren't in
the habit of "pointing" the brushes with their lips.

(Or so I've read.)

Jeff


--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
The speed of light is 1.8*10e12 furlongs per fortnight.

Adam Aglionby
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 5:59 am   



On 24 Mar, 03:37, jeff_wisnia <jwisniadumpt...@conversent.net> wrote:
Quote:
Frank wrote:
On 3/23/2010 8:13 PM, Don Klipstein wrote:

In article<hob0iv$ip...@news.eternal-september.org>, Frank wrote:

On 3/23/2010 12:36 PM, Dave Liquorice wrote:

On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 15:57:02 +0000, Mike Barnes wrote:

The clock I bought recently has some kind of fluorescent paint that
glows green for a short while after the light goes out, but not long
enough to be of much use.

The non-radioactive paints need "charging up" with decent light, kept
in room with the curtains closed or only brief artifical light source
they are dim. The best way to charge up these paints is with a UV
light source, say a bank note light or one for making the invisible
security pens visible.

There are still radio active glow in the dark things in the market.
Mostly emergency signs and the like, they use tritium IIRC rather
than radium.

There are alarm clocks with tritium dials.  Did not google far but they
look pricey:

http://www.gemday.com/item0817.htm

Beta particles from nuclear decay are harmless.

   Not completely.  Bad if source is ingested, bad if source is
inhaled in
form of anything that sticks in lungs or is absorbed into the body from
lungs.  OK if in a closed container and low energy, as is the case with
tritium.

Yes but unlikely and does not compare to the old radium dials that
caused cancer to the women painting them on.

That probably wouldn't have happened as much is the ladies weren't in
the habit of "pointing" the brushes with their lips.

(Or so I've read.)

Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
The speed of light is 1.8*10e12 furlongs per fortnight.

The `Radium Girls` were instructed to, assured Radium was harmless

http://www.radford.edu/wkovarik/envhist/radium.html

It killed its discoverer Marie Curie and continues to present a hazard
all over the place, Forth coastline, Scotland, has radioactive
hotspots from burning scrapped aircraft dials on the shore.

Tritium is very good, but expensive.

Zinc Sulphide is the dissapointing old glow in dark stuff.

Strontium Aluminate is much, much more effective, non radioactive,
glows for easy 8 hours , intially brighter than tritium.

Photoluminescent is the phrase if you want it by the litre, its used
as way to safety markers on things like oil rigs, smaller bits , any
number of vendors like

photoluminescent

personally had good luck with poundland clocks, get the brushes while
your in ;-)

Cheers
Adam

Jonathan
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 9:28 am   



On Mar 23, 2:22 pm, Esco <inva...@nospaml.com> wrote:
Quote:
Where can I get a battery alarm clock which has hands that can be read in
the dark?

I don't know about that but we have an alarm clock that displays the
time in red on the ceiling of our bedroom. it's not bright enough to
disturb our sleep but it's great if you wake in the night and want to
know what timwe it is.

See: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Oregon-Scientific-Classic-Projection-Clock/dp/B000PVLNWI/ref=pd_cp_ce_1

Regards

Jonathan

Andrew Gabriel
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 12:12 pm   



In article <hobll9$532$1_at_news.eternal-september.org>,
Frank <frankperiodlogullo_at_comcast.net> writes:
Quote:
On 3/23/2010 8:13 PM, Don Klipstein wrote:
In article<hob0iv$ip9$1_at_news.eternal-september.org>, Frank wrote:
On 3/23/2010 12:36 PM, Dave Liquorice wrote:
On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 15:57:02 +0000, Mike Barnes wrote:

The clock I bought recently has some kind of fluorescent paint that
glows green for a short while after the light goes out, but not long
enough to be of much use.

The non-radioactive paints need "charging up" with decent light, kept
in room with the curtains closed or only brief artifical light source
they are dim. The best way to charge up these paints is with a UV
light source, say a bank note light or one for making the invisible
security pens visible.

There are still radio active glow in the dark things in the market.
Mostly emergency signs and the like, they use tritium IIRC rather
than radium.

There are alarm clocks with tritium dials. Did not google far but they
look pricey:

http://www.gemday.com/item0817.htm

Beta particles from nuclear decay are harmless.

Not completely. Bad if source is ingested, bad if source is inhaled in
form of anything that sticks in lungs or is absorbed into the body from
lungs. OK if in a closed container and low energy, as is the case with
tritium.

Yes but unlikely and does not compare to the old radium dials that
caused cancer to the women painting them on.

Yes, my grandfathers old watch...
I found it very useful when I built a Maplin geiger
counter kit ~20 years ago.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

Andrew May
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 12:47 pm   



ransley wrote:
Quote:
On Mar 23, 9:22 am, Esco <inva...@nospaml.com> wrote:
Where can I get a battery alarm clock which has hands that can be read in
the dark?

Ive seen them but you have to push a button to make them light, post
back if you find one that just stays lit, I just got a Weather
thermometer with clock at HD, but again its dark till you push the
button but it has an RF set clock so it never needs setting.

I am surprised that there is nothing like this available. It shouldn't
be that hard or that expensive to design something that has a small
photovoltaic cell to charge a small battery during the day, even from
ambient light, and then dimly light a set of LEDs when dark using a
low-power circuit to generate a low mark/space ratio driver to conserve
power.

Not done the sums though so I could be way out.

Andrew

RobertL
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:15 pm   



On Mar 23, 6:55 pm, NT <meow2...@care2.com> wrote:
Quote:
On Mar 23, 3:39 pm, RobertL <robertml...@yahoo.com> wrote:

On Mar 23, 2:22 pm, Esco <inva...@nospaml.com> wrote:
Where can I get a battery alarm clock which has hands that can be read in
the dark?

they don't use radioactive luminous paint any more, so 'glow in the
dark' watches and clocks are a thing of the past.

Robert

you might still find an old one, but then you get to put up with
clockwork's inaccuracy and need for incessant winding.


and you have to put up with the released radon-222 gas! Part of
the safety advice (below link) is not to keep it on your bedside
table.

http://www.vintagewatchstraps.com/luminous.htm

Robert

Man at B&Q
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:42 pm   



On Mar 23, 11:48 pm, NT <meow2...@care2.com> wrote:
Quote:
On Mar 23, 3:31 pm, Bernard Peek <b...@shrdlu.com> wrote:

On 23/03/10 14:35, TMC wrote:

"Esco" <inva...@nospaml.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9D449240A9D945D4AM2_at_newsfarm.ams2.highwinds-media.com...
Where can I get a battery alarm clock which has hands that can be read in
the dark?

Argos £2.50

Extravagant! I'd check Poundland first.

Don't... just don't.


Why ever not? They work, I have one. Clearly you can't say the same
about everything at poundland but if Argos can sell 'em for £2.50 then
£1 is probably about the right price.

MBQ

Man at B&Q
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:43 pm   



On Mar 23, 2:55 pm, ransley <Mark_Rans...@Yahoo.com> wrote:
Quote:
On Mar 23, 9:22 am, Esco <inva...@nospaml.com> wrote:

Where can I get a battery alarm clock which has hands that can be read in
the dark?

Ive seen them but you have to push a button to make them light, post
back if you find one that just stays lit, I just got a Weather
thermometer with clock at HD, but again its dark till you push the
button but it has an RF set clock so it never needs setting.

Battery != digital.

Just get an anlog one with luminous hands.

MBQ

dennis@home
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:40 pm   



"Man at B&Q" <manatbandq_at_hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:67afa467-0bc2-4c93-99b7-9e468960e700_at_q21g2000yqm.googlegroups.com...


Quote:
Battery != digital.

There are very few battery clocks that don't use a crystal and a *digital*
divider to keep the time.

Man at B&Q
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:08 pm   



On Mar 24, 2:40 pm, "dennis_at_home" <den...@killspam.kicks-ass.net>
wrote:
Quote:
"Man at B&Q" <manatba...@hotmail.com> wrote in messagenews:67afa467-0bc2-4c93-99b7-9e468960e700_at_q21g2000yqm.googlegroups.com...

Battery != digital.

There are very few battery clocks that don't use a crystal and a *digital*
divider to keep the time.

There are some, but that's not really relevant, other than Dennis
trying to twist the argument for his own ends, again.

The terms analog and digital, in refererence to clocks, usually refer
to the display. I don't give a shit what technology is used to keep
the time so long as it meets my needs for accuracy.

MBQ

geoff
Guest

Wed Mar 24, 2010 9:38 pm   



In message
<c73c1246-9ac5-4ac0-8d0c-adde86f6b9e9_at_r27g2000yqn.googlegroups.com>, Man
at B&Q <manatbandq_at_hotmail.com> writes
Quote:
On Mar 24, 2:40 pm, "dennis_at_home" <den...@killspam.kicks-ass.net
wrote:
"Man at B&Q" <manatba...@hotmail.com> wrote in
messagenews:67afa467-0bc2-4c93-99b7-9e468960e700_at_q21g2000yqm.googlegrou
ps.com...

Battery != digital.

There are very few battery clocks that don't use a crystal and a *digital*
divider to keep the time.

There are some, but that's not really relevant, other than Dennis
trying to twist the argument for his own ends, again.

The terms analog and digital, in refererence to clocks, usually refer
to the display. I don't give a shit what technology is used to keep
the time so long as it meets my needs for accuracy.

I have a radio clock which projects on the bedroom ceiling


works for me




and don't forget that clocks change this weekend




--
geoff

The Daring Dufas
Guest

Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:11 am   



Bernard Peek wrote:
Quote:
On 23/03/10 14:35, TMC wrote:

"Esco" <invalid_at_nospaml.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9D449240A9D945D4AM2_at_newsfarm.ams2.highwinds-media.com...
Where can I get a battery alarm clock which has hands that can be
read in
the dark?

Argos £2.50


Extravagant! I'd check Poundland first.



OH MY GOD! The British have their version of our Dollar Store.

ROTFLMAO

TDD

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elektroda.net NewsGroups Forum Index - Electronics Equipment - [off topic] Glow in the dark alarm clock

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