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Ian Field
Guest

Fri Nov 28, 2014 3:56 am   



Recently I came by archives of various American electronics magezines.

There are numerous projects that list Motorola HEP semiconductors.

Just out of curiosity - is HEP an abreviation?

Any sources of data might come in handy for reviving a few old projects that
might be possible to modify for silicon devices.

Thanks.

Mark Zenier
Guest

Sat Nov 29, 2014 1:44 am   



In article <eeMdw.1629$mp2.1485_at_fx01.am4>,
Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:
Quote:
Recently I came by archives of various American electronics magezines.

There are numerous projects that list Motorola HEP semiconductors.

Just out of curiosity - is HEP an abreviation?

Any sources of data might come in handy for reviving a few old projects that
might be possible to modify for silicon devices.


"Hobbyist, Experimenter, Professional"

It was late enough that most of the parts were silicon.

It was a combination of a universal replacement parts line along with some
interesting parts like some early single chip audio amps, digital dividers,
and the like. Some stuff to fix stuff with, some stuff to play with.
A selection similar to the parts section of a Radio Shack (of a couple of
years later), targeted at the pegboard section of the then commmon local
radio parts store.

Those old ICs (single sourced from Motorola) are long gone, but most of
the discrete parts would have NTE equivalents.


Mark Zenier mzenier_at_eskimo.com
Googleproofaddress(account:mzenier provider:eskimo domain:com)

Ian Field
Guest

Sun Nov 30, 2014 12:12 am   



"Mark Zenier" <mzenier_at_eskimo.com> wrote in message
news:m5cqtu0k3l_at_enews4.newsguy.com...
Quote:
In article <eeMdw.1629$mp2.1485_at_fx01.am4>,
Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:
Recently I came by archives of various American electronics magezines.

There are numerous projects that list Motorola HEP semiconductors.

Just out of curiosity - is HEP an abreviation?

Any sources of data might come in handy for reviving a few old projects
that
might be possible to modify for silicon devices.

"Hobbyist, Experimenter, Professional"

It was late enough that most of the parts were silicon.


Thanks.

As it happens, as I read my way through the archive of Popular Electronics,
I stumbled upon a page announcing the end of HEP parts - this was the first
and only time I'd seen the definition in print.

That was only a few hours after posting my question.

Any ideas where to look for data/cross-reference? It might be interesting to
revive some of those old projects.

David Snowdon
Guest

Sun Nov 30, 2014 6:09 am   



Want to spend some money? For $15 ($10 + $5 shipping):

1977 Motorola HEP Program Semiconductor Cross Reference Guide and Catalog

http://www.abebooks.com/Motorola-HEP-Program-Semiconductor-Croos-Reference/11055280392/bd



By the way, there were two numbering systems for transistors in the HEP
line. For a conversion chart:

http://www.electronicspoint.com/threads/motorola-hep-old-numbers-to-newer-numbers.248851/

David

--
Ian Field wrote:
Quote:
Recently I came by archives of various American electronics magezines.

There are numerous projects that list Motorola HEP semiconductors.

Just out of curiosity - is HEP an abreviation?

Any sources of data might come in handy for reviving a few old projects
that might be possible to modify for silicon devices.

Thanks.


---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com

Ian Field
Guest

Mon Dec 01, 2014 1:23 am   



"David Snowdon" <norway_at_netscape.ca> wrote in message
news:m5djmh$v1e$1_at_speranza.aioe.org...
Quote:
Want to spend some money? For $15 ($10 + $5 shipping):

1977 Motorola HEP Program Semiconductor Cross Reference Guide and Catalog

http://www.abebooks.com/Motorola-HEP-Program-Semiconductor-Croos-Reference/11055280392/bd



By the way, there were two numbering systems for transistors in the HEP
line. For a conversion chart:

http://www.electronicspoint.com/threads/motorola-hep-old-numbers-to-newer-numbers.248851/


Thanks - that could save a bit of confusion should I find a cross reference
to mainstream parts.

Michael Black
Guest

Mon Dec 01, 2014 1:26 am   



On Sat, 29 Nov 2014, Ian Field wrote:

Quote:


"Mark Zenier" <mzenier_at_eskimo.com> wrote in message
news:m5cqtu0k3l_at_enews4.newsguy.com...
In article <eeMdw.1629$mp2.1485_at_fx01.am4>,
Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:
Recently I came by archives of various American electronics magezines.

There are numerous projects that list Motorola HEP semiconductors.

Just out of curiosity - is HEP an abreviation?

Any sources of data might come in handy for reviving a few old projects
that
might be possible to modify for silicon devices.

"Hobbyist, Experimenter, Professional"

It was late enough that most of the parts were silicon.

Thanks.

As it happens, as I read my way through the archive of Popular
Electronics, I stumbled upon a page announcing the end of HEP parts -
this was the first and only time I'd seen the definition in print.

That was only a few hours after posting my question.

Any ideas where to look for data/cross-reference? It might be interesting to
revive some of those old projects.

You could ask.


I'm not prepared to give up my HEP replacement guides, or scan them, but
if you happened to ask in the newsgroup what HEP-XXX was, I'd probably be
inclined to look it up. There was a time when I did that quite a bit, but
the internet has evolved quite a bit since 1994, and there are fewer
questions like that, I assume because some of the old databooks have been
scanned.

Those old construction articles, people would specify what was available.
It was never clear if they actually used the specified parts, or just
listed parts that could be had easily. As I've said in the past, there
were a relatively small subset of transistors and diodes used in the hobby
magazines (and I gather a similar but different subset in the UK
magazines), though I was never sure which came first? SOmeone had to
pick a specific device at some point, all those 2N706s and later 2N2222s,
but once they were used, the hobby stores would carry them, which caused
others to specify them.

HEP was like that, a line that often was available in local outlets, but
really quite expensive. I remember telling a friend in high school that
he could just get a cheap op-amp for that lie detector he was building out
of Popular Science (around 1974), and he said "I don't want to make any
mistakes", so he paid the premium for the HEP numbered device, since the
article didn't say anything about the IC except the HEP part number. I
don't know if the author used a cheap op-amp in the original, and then
specified the HEP replacement because it would be easier to get, or if he
actually bought the HEP device to begin with. In that case, it was a
generic op-amp, much easier to be sure than a transistor in the line.

The HEP line was different from the NTE and ECG line that came later. It
was a Motorola only line. SO they had some exotic Motorola ICs (some came
in very odd packages, so you knew that it really was a Motorola device),
but if it wasn't made by Motorola, you'd get some line about "approximate
substitution", ie a workalike. That was fine for logic gates and op-amps,
but it fell apart with really specific parts. NTE and ECG tried to cover
everything, their line was much larger as was their replacement guide. So
if nothing else, the ECG and NTE guides were better at telling you what
the device was, which is all I ever used the HEP replacement guide for.

The HEP line was relatively small when it started, really aimed more at
the hobbyist, then got larger a couple of years later. But it was still
for the hobbyist or at least professional prototyper, it wasn't extensive
enough for the serviceman when it came to ICs. It also wasn't uncommon to
find errors in the guide, clearly not the right replacement for a specific
device.

What year wsa the announcement that the line was shutting down? I never
saw that, and I was still reading Popular Electronics, though mabye
sporadically, when it changed it's name and some of its format before
dying about 1984. I was never aware that the HEP line had shutdown, only
an assumption that it must have at some point, but never aware of when.

Michael

Mark Zenier
Guest

Mon Dec 01, 2014 2:08 am   



In article <t7new.29186$Za1.90_at_fx22.am4>,
Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:

Quote:
Any ideas where to look for data/cross-reference? It might be interesting to
revive some of those old projects.


The NTE cross reference book I have has a page and a half of HEP numbers.
With the generic nature of "universal replacement", probably "close
enough".


Mark Zenier mzenier_at_eskimo.com
Googleproofaddress(account:mzenier provider:eskimo domain:com)


Guest

Wed Dec 03, 2014 7:54 am   



Mark Zenier <mzenier_at_eskimo.com> wrote:
Quote:
In article <t7new.29186$Za1.90_at_fx22.am4>,
Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:

Any ideas where to look for data/cross-reference? It might be
interesting to revive some of those old projects.

The NTE cross reference book I have has a page and a half of HEP
numbers. With the generic nature of "universal replacement",
probably "close enough".


This reminded me that I have a 1987 "Semiconductor Reference Guide" from
Radio Shack (USA). It lists a few HEP numbers, but just the ones that
crossed to then-current Radio Shack parts. From this limited set of
data, the HEP part number scheme appears to have been, roughly...

HEPnnn transistors - mostly Si?
HEPCnnnn ICs
HEPGnnn transistors - Ge?
HEPPnnn various: one transistor, one optocoupler
HEPRnnn rectifier diodes
HEPSnnn transistors - mostly Si?
HEPZnnn Zener diodes

I scanned the two pages of cross-reference, plus one page of decoder
ring. The first two pages will cross an HEPnnn number to a 276-nnnn
Radio Shack catalog number. The third page crosses the 276-nnnn number
to a standard part number. PDF at: http://birdbird.org/tmp/hep.pdf

I hope this helps!

Matt Roberds

Ian Field
Guest

Thu Dec 04, 2014 12:14 am   



<mroberds_at_att.net> wrote in message news:m5m8ia$2jq$1_at_dont-email.me...
Quote:
Mark Zenier <mzenier_at_eskimo.com> wrote:
In article <t7new.29186$Za1.90_at_fx22.am4>,
Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:

Any ideas where to look for data/cross-reference? It might be
interesting to revive some of those old projects.

The NTE cross reference book I have has a page and a half of HEP
numbers. With the generic nature of "universal replacement",
probably "close enough".

This reminded me that I have a 1987 "Semiconductor Reference Guide" from
Radio Shack (USA). It lists a few HEP numbers, but just the ones that
crossed to then-current Radio Shack parts. From this limited set of
data, the HEP part number scheme appears to have been, roughly...

HEPnnn transistors - mostly Si?
HEPCnnnn ICs
HEPGnnn transistors - Ge?
HEPPnnn various: one transistor, one optocoupler
HEPRnnn rectifier diodes
HEPSnnn transistors - mostly Si?
HEPZnnn Zener diodes

I scanned the two pages of cross-reference, plus one page of decoder
ring. The first two pages will cross an HEPnnn number to a 276-nnnn
Radio Shack catalog number. The third page crosses the 276-nnnn number
to a standard part number. PDF at: http://birdbird.org/tmp/hep.pdf


Thanks.

kilowatt
Guest

Sun Dec 07, 2014 12:48 am   



The HEP refers to the RCA line of replacement semiconductors, called Hobby Electronic Product HEP

Large catalog of subs and generics. I have a copy in my Libr. If your list is not too long I could look up a few pt no.s

JS

*********

On Thursday, 27 November 2014 12:56:44 UTC-8, Ian Field wrote:
Quote:
Recently I came by archives of various American electronics magezines.

There are numerous projects that list Motorola HEP semiconductors.

Just out of curiosity - is HEP an abreviation?

Any sources of data might come in handy for reviving a few old projects that
might be possible to modify for silicon devices.

Thanks.


Michael A. Terrell
Guest

Sun Dec 07, 2014 3:28 pm   



kilowatt wrote:
Quote:

The HEP refers to the RCA line of replacement semiconductors, called Hobby Electronic Product HEP

Large catalog of subs and generics. I have a copy in my Libr. If your list is not too long I could look up a few pt no.s



No, HEP was Motorola. RCA was SK.


--
Anyone wanting to run for any political office in the US should have to
have a DD214, and a honorable discharge.

Ian Field
Guest

Mon Dec 08, 2014 12:46 am   



"Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell_at_earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:4PKdnTPg6vwFkhnJnZ2dnUU7-QWdnZ2d_at_earthlink.com...
Quote:

kilowatt wrote:

The HEP refers to the RCA line of replacement semiconductors, called
Hobby Electronic Product HEP

Large catalog of subs and generics. I have a copy in my Libr. If your
list is not too long I could look up a few pt no.s



No, HEP was Motorola. RCA was SK.


That reminds me - an SK reference would also come in handy, those parts turn
up fairly often in the Indian magazine; Electronics For You.

Michael Black
Guest

Mon Dec 08, 2014 7:29 am   



On Sun, 7 Dec 2014, Ian Field wrote:

Quote:


"Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell_at_earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:4PKdnTPg6vwFkhnJnZ2dnUU7-QWdnZ2d_at_earthlink.com...

kilowatt wrote:

The HEP refers to the RCA line of replacement semiconductors, called Hobby
Electronic Product HEP

Large catalog of subs and generics. I have a copy in my Libr. If your list
is not too long I could look up a few pt no.s



No, HEP was Motorola. RCA was SK.


That reminds me - an SK reference would also come in handy, those parts turn
up fairly often in the Indian magazine; Electronics For You.

I don't think I ever saw an SK guide. They existed, but I just never saw
one. They were never used that much, at the moment I'm finding it hard to
think of where I'd have seen them. THe HEP did get referenced in
magazines.

I have a lot of RCA databooks, I knew someone who worked at RCA in the
seventies, but I don't think any of the databooks mention SK.

Michael

Mark Zenier
Guest

Mon Dec 08, 2014 11:58 pm   



In article <alpine.LNX.2.02.1412071927140.6750_at_darkstar.example.org>,
Michael Black <et472_at_ncf.ca> wrote:
Quote:
On Sun, 7 Dec 2014, Ian Field wrote:



"Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell_at_earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:4PKdnTPg6vwFkhnJnZ2dnUU7-QWdnZ2d_at_earthlink.com...

kilowatt wrote:

The HEP refers to the RCA line of replacement semiconductors, called Hobby
Electronic Product HEP

Large catalog of subs and generics. I have a copy in my Libr. If your list
is not too long I could look up a few pt no.s



No, HEP was Motorola. RCA was SK.


That reminds me - an SK reference would also come in handy, those parts turn
up fairly often in the Indian magazine; Electronics For You.

I don't think I ever saw an SK guide. They existed, but I just never saw
one. They were never used that much, at the moment I'm finding it hard to
think of where I'd have seen them. THe HEP did get referenced in
magazines.


They were like the ECG and NTE "phonebooks", but I only saw them at the
electronics stores. They probably didn't make as big a deal about
selling them as ECG/NTE did.

I've even got a NTE floppy disk with the cross reference database lookup
on it, for MS-DOS. Looked at the data to see if the data could be
extracted so I could run a reverse sort, but it was encrypted/compressed
in some non-trivial way.

Quote:
I have a lot of RCA databooks, I knew someone who worked at RCA in the
seventies, but I don't think any of the databooks mention SK.


Wasn't it part of the TV manufacturing, not the Semiconductor division?
I vaguely remember that the SK stuff was under Thomson for a while.

Mark Zenier mzenier_at_eskimo.com
Googleproofaddress(account:mzenier provider:eskimo domain:com)

Michael A. Terrell
Guest

Tue Dec 09, 2014 12:35 am   



Michael Black wrote:
Quote:

On Sun, 7 Dec 2014, Ian Field wrote:



"Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell_at_earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:4PKdnTPg6vwFkhnJnZ2dnUU7-QWdnZ2d_at_earthlink.com...

kilowatt wrote:

The HEP refers to the RCA line of replacement semiconductors, called Hobby
Electronic Product HEP

Large catalog of subs and generics. I have a copy in my Libr. If your list
is not too long I could look up a few pt no.s



No, HEP was Motorola. RCA was SK.


That reminds me - an SK reference would also come in handy, those parts turn
up fairly often in the Indian magazine; Electronics For You.

I don't think I ever saw an SK guide. They existed, but I just never saw
one. They were never used that much, at the moment I'm finding it hard to
think of where I'd have seen them. THe HEP did get referenced in
magazines.

I have a lot of RCA databooks, I knew someone who worked at RCA in the
seventies, but I don't think any of the databooks mention SK.


We used ECG, GE, HEP, NTE, SK and Workman in the shops where I lived
and worked in the '70s. The SK cross reference was as thick as the ECG.
There were several RCA distributors in our area, so the SK line was easy
to get. ECG was the best stocked, and most preferred. GE had the lowest
quality, just like the semiconductors they used in their consumer
products. Some of the floor sweepings from Poly Paks were better than
the GE replacement line.

SK was repair parts, not OEM

--
Anyone wanting to run for any political office in the US should have to
have a DD214, and a honorable discharge.

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