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lost one channel on an old Onkyo amplifier

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Tim R
Guest

Sun Aug 09, 2015 5:06 am   



I have an old and extremely heavy Onkyo stereo amplifier that I use in the basement in my workroom. I bought it years ago at a thrift shop and it's worked well for years.

Now only one channel works. I've tried it on A and B speakers and mono, doesn't matter. Sound comes out of only one side.

Is there anything simple this is likely to be, or is it time to set it out by the curb? (in my neighborhood nothing makes it to garbage day)

There was a thunderstorm and power outage this week, but I'm not sure if it failed before or after.

Shaun
Guest

Sun Aug 09, 2015 7:30 am   



"Tim R" wrote in message
news:425fdc8f-20ed-40b2-ad73-fa7bbedff349_at_googlegroups.com...

I have an old and extremely heavy Onkyo stereo amplifier that I use in the
basement in my workroom. I bought it years ago at a thrift shop and it's
worked well for years.

Now only one channel works. I've tried it on A and B speakers and mono,
doesn't matter. Sound comes out of only one side.

Is there anything simple this is likely to be, or is it time to set it out
by the curb? (in my neighborhood nothing makes it to garbage day)

There was a thunderstorm and power outage this week, but I'm not sure if it
failed before or after.



I've fixed my 5 channel Onkyo amplifier years ago; It was just cracked
solder joints between the RCA connectors and the circuit board. I would
suspect in your case that you may have a failed transistor or two. You have
the other channel to compare the reading too. Remove the power transistors
(mounted on heat sinks) and check them with an DMM on diode check, then
compare them to the pair from the working side. It is probably worth the
effort since Onkyo has a good name for mid quality Hi-Fi equipment. Then
look on the internet for replacements or Substitutes and get a matched pair.

Shaun

Trevor Wilson
Guest

Sun Aug 09, 2015 7:30 am   



On 9/08/2015 1:06 PM, Tim R wrote:
Quote:
I have an old and extremely heavy Onkyo stereo amplifier that I use
in the basement in my workroom. I bought it years ago at a thrift
shop and it's worked well for years.

Now only one channel works. I've tried it on A and B speakers and
mono, doesn't matter. Sound comes out of only one side.

Is there anything simple this is likely to be, or is it time to set
it out by the curb? (in my neighborhood nothing makes it to garbage
day)

There was a thunderstorm and power outage this week, but I'm not sure
if it failed before or after.


**Since you have declined to provide any useful information, I doubt you
can be helped. A model number would be nice. Some old amps are well
worth resurrecting. Some are not. Given that yours is "old and extremely
heavy" (how much is that - 10kg or 50kg?), then maybe it's worth fixing.
Or not.



--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au

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Tim R
Guest

Sun Aug 09, 2015 11:13 pm   



On Sunday, August 9, 2015 at 12:21:40 AM UTC-4, Trevor Wilson wrote:
Quote:

**Since you have declined to provide any useful information, I doubt you
can be helped. A model number would be nice. Some old amps are well
worth resurrecting. Some are not. Given that yours is "old and extremely


Sorry about that, the model number was on the back.

It's an Onkyo TX-3000. I bought it for $5 at a thrift store years ago, and still remember carrying it to the car several blocks away.

I just looked it up, the weight is 11.4 kg. The date is given as 1981, which may make it almost 35 years old.

I haven't opened it up to look yet.

Trevor Wilson
Guest

Mon Aug 10, 2015 5:05 am   



On 10/08/2015 7:13 AM, Tim R wrote:
Quote:
On Sunday, August 9, 2015 at 12:21:40 AM UTC-4, Trevor Wilson wrote:

**Since you have declined to provide any useful information, I
doubt you can be helped. A model number would be nice. Some old
amps are well worth resurrecting. Some are not. Given that yours is
"old and extremely

Sorry about that, the model number was on the back.

It's an Onkyo TX-3000. I bought it for $5 at a thrift store years
ago, and still remember carrying it to the car several blocks away.

I just looked it up, the weight is 11.4 kg. The date is given as
1981, which may make it almost 35 years old.

I haven't opened it up to look yet.


**I guess our definition of "heavy" is very different. 11.4kg is not
heavy. 50kg is heavy. Either way, your Onkyo is an attractive,
retro-styled receiver. Keep an eye on eBay for typical selling prices.
That will provide an indication as to the viability of repair. Your
first option should be to obtain a service manual, or schematic and
perform the usual fault-finding process.

--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

Tim R
Guest

Mon Aug 10, 2015 2:27 pm   



On Monday, August 10, 2015 at 7:00:33 AM UTC-4, Mark Zacharias wrote:
Quote:
The OP has no technical expertise. Other than the 4 amp fuses on the rear of
the unit, his chances of fixing it himself are low.

Having said the obvious, if there is sound at that channel of the volume
control, the fault is most likely an output IC (STK0050II) or driver IC
(STK3062).


This is true. I can do some minor component replacement but am lost troubleshooting, so the chances of finding the right component are small.

Just to be clear I've described the problem, here is what happens: sound comes out of one side of the speaker connections but not out of the other, regardless whether I push the mono or stereo utton, regardless whether I use speakers A or speakers B.

My question revolved around whether an Onkyo is worth fixing (sounds like yes), is easy to fix (sounds like no) and whether a 35 year old piece of equipment has multiple other parts at the end of life.


Guest

Mon Aug 10, 2015 2:35 pm   



> My question revolved around whether an Onkyo is worth fixing (sounds like yes), is easy to fix (sounds like no) and whether a 35 year old piece of equipment has multiple other parts at the end of life.

This should be a simple fix. Where are you located? There are some of us that would be willing to repair it for you I'm sure at a reasonable cost.

Dan

P.S. I have NOS STKs available if the ones listed up thread are accurate.

Wolfgang Allinger
Guest

Mon Aug 10, 2015 4:31 pm   



On 10 Aug 15 at group /sci/electronics/repair in article 55c8844e$0$3646$4c5efc6d_at_fastusenet.org
<mark_zacharias_at_labolgcbs.net> (Mark Zacharias) wrote:

Quote:
"Trevor Wilson" <trevor_at_SPAMBLOCKrageaudio.com.au> wrote in message
news:d2q4njFrdq6U1_at_mid.individual.net...
On 10/08/2015 7:13 AM, Tim R wrote:
On Sunday, August 9, 2015 at 12:21:40 AM UTC-4, Trevor Wilson
wrote:

**Since you have declined to provide any useful information, I
doubt you can be helped. A model number would be nice. Some old
amps are well worth resurrecting. Some are not. Given that yours
is "old and extremely

Sorry about that, the model number was on the back.

It's an Onkyo TX-3000. I bought it for $5 at a thrift store years
ago, and still remember carrying it to the car several blocks away.


Quote:
The OP has no technical expertise. Other than the 4 amp fuses on the
rear of the unit, his chances of fixing it himself are low.

Having said the obvious, if there is sound at that channel of the
volume control, the fault is most likely an output IC (STK0050II) or
driver IC (STK3062).

New old stock replacements are rare and Chinese counterfeits are
likely to perform poorly if at all.


Some amplifier have Relais just to suppress the PWRon `plopping`.

Find out, if the Onkyo has it.

The contact (material) often is bad selected, designed, dirty or
broken...

Knocking these Relais while powered with the grip of a screwdriver from
different direction just to see if gives some scratching noise.

Some relais may be opened easily and press/move/clean the contacts.
Or find out the layout position of the contact and bridge them for the
faulty channel.


Saludos (an alle Vernünftigen, Rest sh. sig)
Wolfgang

--
Wolfgang Allinger, anerkannter Trollallergiker Smile reply Adresse gesetzt!
Ich diskutiere zukünftig weniger mit Idioten, denn sie ziehen mich auf
ihr Niveau herunter und schlagen mich dort mit ihrer Erfahrung! :p
(lt. alter usenet Weisheit) iPod, iPhone, iPad, iTunes, iRak, iDiot

Mark Zacharias
Guest

Mon Aug 10, 2015 5:00 pm   



"Trevor Wilson" <trevor_at_SPAMBLOCKrageaudio.com.au> wrote in message
news:d2q4njFrdq6U1_at_mid.individual.net...
Quote:
On 10/08/2015 7:13 AM, Tim R wrote:
On Sunday, August 9, 2015 at 12:21:40 AM UTC-4, Trevor Wilson wrote:

**Since you have declined to provide any useful information, I
doubt you can be helped. A model number would be nice. Some old
amps are well worth resurrecting. Some are not. Given that yours is
"old and extremely

Sorry about that, the model number was on the back.

It's an Onkyo TX-3000. I bought it for $5 at a thrift store years
ago, and still remember carrying it to the car several blocks away.

I just looked it up, the weight is 11.4 kg. The date is given as
1981, which may make it almost 35 years old.

I haven't opened it up to look yet.


**I guess our definition of "heavy" is very different. 11.4kg is not
heavy. 50kg is heavy. Either way, your Onkyo is an attractive,
retro-styled receiver. Keep an eye on eBay for typical selling prices.
That will provide an indication as to the viability of repair. Your first
option should be to obtain a service manual, or schematic and perform the
usual fault-finding process.

--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus



The OP has no technical expertise. Other than the 4 amp fuses on the rear of
the unit, his chances of fixing it himself are low.

Having said the obvious, if there is sound at that channel of the volume
control, the fault is most likely an output IC (STK0050II) or driver IC
(STK3062).

New old stock replacements are rare and Chinese counterfeits are likely to
perform poorly if at all.


Mark Z.

Tim R
Guest

Mon Aug 10, 2015 6:21 pm   



On Monday, August 10, 2015 at 8:35:33 AM UTC-4, dansabr...@yahoo.com wrote:
Quote:
My question revolved around whether an Onkyo is worth fixing (sounds like yes), is easy to fix (sounds like no) and whether a 35 year old piece of equipment has multiple other parts at the end of life.

This should be a simple fix. Where are you located? There are some of us that would be willing to repair it for you I'm sure at a reasonable cost.


Central Virginia, south of Richmond.

Cydrome Leader
Guest

Mon Aug 10, 2015 8:12 pm   



Tim R <timothy42b_at_aol.com> wrote:
Quote:
On Sunday, August 9, 2015 at 12:21:40 AM UTC-4, Trevor Wilson wrote:

**Since you have declined to provide any useful information, I doubt you
can be helped. A model number would be nice. Some old amps are well
worth resurrecting. Some are not. Given that yours is "old and extremely

Sorry about that, the model number was on the back.

It's an Onkyo TX-3000. I bought it for $5 at a thrift store years ago, and still remember carrying it to the car several blocks away.

I just looked it up, the weight is 11.4 kg. The date is given as 1981, which may make it almost 35 years old.

I haven't opened it up to look yet.


Start simple.

Check the speaker fuses on the rear. Swap good for bad to make sure the
amp module isn't also blown if that's an issue.

pfjw@aol.com
Guest

Mon Aug 10, 2015 9:17 pm   



On Monday, August 10, 2015 at 2:24:32 PM UTC-4, Shaun wrote:

Quote:
If it has Output ICs instead of discrete components; just throw it out, they
are not worth fixing any way.

I would have thought that on older model Onkyo would be discrete.

Shaun


It has ICs. And unless such are readily available and/or there are valid substitutions, it is emphatically NOT worth fixing if they are blown and you would have to pay someone else to diagnose, order parts, install the parts, test and give back.

On the other hand, fuses do get weaker with age and strain. It may well be that one or another of them is blown. DO NOT rely on visual inspection to determine if a fuse is good or not. A fuse that fails from age typically does so at the solder point, and that would be invisible. Check with a VOM, or simply install new fuses. If one is visibly blown, however, try to look for a cause before plugging in a new fuse.

Also, DO check solder joints both on the input and output side. Also at any speaker switches. One simple cold-solder or broken solder joint can condemn an otherwise good component to landfill for no good reason.

http://olx.pl/oferta/tuner-onkyo-tx-3000-CID99-ID9nSKW.html This is a picture of the guts, clearly showing the driver and output ICs. From my seat and with my eyes, it looks like a STK0050-II which is an off-the-shelf item usually selling in the US$8 - 12 range, or so. Maybe even less. Search for eBay item: 121715396881 as one readily available example.

So, check for mechanical issues. Check for obvious problems such as a loose wire, poor contact at an RCA jack or output connection, the usual suspects.. Check _all_ fuses. Then, if all else fails and you feel that replacing the modules would not be beyond your skills, purchase two (2) and have-at. The second one is if the 'other' one goes bad in the future. Maybe even keep a spare driver IC if you really like this beast.

I would offer to fix it, but between shipping and the 90+ days it would take me even to get around to it, you are far better off staying local.

Trevor, my heaviest tuner is 11.7 kg. My heaviest amp is just a hair under 26 kg. It's funny - my 200 WPC SS amp weighs only one kg. less than my 75-WPC tube amp at 24.9 kg.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Shaun
Guest

Tue Aug 11, 2015 12:24 am   



"Mark Zacharias" wrote in message
news:55c8844e$0$3646$4c5efc6d_at_fastusenet.org...

"Trevor Wilson" <trevor_at_SPAMBLOCKrageaudio.com.au> wrote in message
news:d2q4njFrdq6U1_at_mid.individual.net...
Quote:
On 10/08/2015 7:13 AM, Tim R wrote:
On Sunday, August 9, 2015 at 12:21:40 AM UTC-4, Trevor Wilson wrote:

**Since you have declined to provide any useful information, I
doubt you can be helped. A model number would be nice. Some old
amps are well worth resurrecting. Some are not. Given that yours is
"old and extremely

Sorry about that, the model number was on the back.

It's an Onkyo TX-3000. I bought it for $5 at a thrift store years
ago, and still remember carrying it to the car several blocks away.

I just looked it up, the weight is 11.4 kg. The date is given as
1981, which may make it almost 35 years old.

I haven't opened it up to look yet.


**I guess our definition of "heavy" is very different. 11.4kg is not
heavy. 50kg is heavy. Either way, your Onkyo is an attractive,
retro-styled receiver. Keep an eye on eBay for typical selling prices.
That will provide an indication as to the viability of repair. Your first
option should be to obtain a service manual, or schematic and perform the
usual fault-finding process.

--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus



The OP has no technical expertise. Other than the 4 amp fuses on the rear of
the unit, his chances of fixing it himself are low.

Having said the obvious, if there is sound at that channel of the volume
control, the fault is most likely an output IC (STK0050II) or driver IC
(STK3062).

New old stock replacements are rare and Chinese counterfeits are likely to
perform poorly if at all.


Mark Z.


If it has Output ICs instead of discrete components; just throw it out, they
are not worth fixing any way.

I would have thought that on older model Onkyo would be discrete.

Shaun


Guest

Tue Aug 11, 2015 12:43 am   



I got bad news and good news, though you already heards, it has ICs.

The good news is that if it didn't make any nasty noises, it is probably just the speaker fuse.

More good news is that if it cannot be fixed, a preamp level output can be had because the tone controls are separate from the power amp. What's more, the bad STK could be faked out to get a ittle bit more gain out of the STK3062. Not my favorite approach but would work. The 3062 is probably good, and if not there were enough of those around and not failing that it would be easier to find NOS.

I can rework it to take more modern chips. The FM is decent, has four gang tuning which is better than most. The chipset and design overall are good. All you need is a power only amp.

But change those speaker fuses first. They are usuallly under a rectangular cover on the back wiht one #1 phillips screw in the middle. They go simply from fatigue sometimes. Or if someome connecteed too many speakers to it.

Tell you this much, if you are lucky and it is just the fuse, change them both and then make sure to only use one pair of eight ohm speakers on it and make sure not to cover the vents. Keep it cool. If those STK power ICs have lasted this long they will probably last alot longer.

If they are bad I can retrofit new ICs in there. It would technically no longer be an Ohky amp but you still would have the Onkyo tuner and preamp. It would be easy to get pre level outputs but putting the amp in there would mean you can still use its internal speaker switching.

I cna do it but shipping from there to Ohio and back would not be cheap and you have to pack it as though it is going to be handled like a basketball, because it is. I retrofitted a Mitsubishi Interplay system for a guy in Pittsburgh and the round trip was $300, AND THEY UCKED IT UP ! It was insidious damag3 so a claim would be just too much trouble, plus what wuld they pay ? So we met at the state line and I fixed it and met again and everyone is happy. Shipping was rally high because that is a heavy unit with a (half decent) vertical linear tracking turntable. Your unit would not be as much, but you are really too far to meet.

The other thing is that on eBay they go from about $100 down to $32. But there is only one for sale now and it is for repair or parts. The $32 one, some people are not too bright and have a really short auction and don't put a reserve on it. Boss just did that with a vintage echoplex machine, I'll have to have a talk with him about that...

If you need and want this done, probably around a hundred bucks plus parts (probably fifty), and shipping both ways should be about a hundred. That is more than the thing will bring. If you like it allt then it is worth it. If not, don't throw it out, sell it to someone. Even for parts. Sometimes a knob can fetch $25. To get really good money you have to part it out and list all the goodies separately on eBay, or let someone do it.

You can probably get decent money out of the good STK, if one is bad.

So don't just throw it in the trash.


Guest

Tue Aug 11, 2015 12:47 am   



>"P.S. I have NOS STKs available if the ones listed up thread are accurate.. "

Do you happen to have an STK0100 II and if so, how much ? I am already fitting one into a Fisher CA-800 that used to have 0080s in it. The one I got I know is NOS. It might be nice to do both at the same time because I have to do some things to the heatsink because the 0100 is bigger.

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