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rickman
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 7:30 am   



I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still enter
it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the universe by
orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated causing energy to
be emitted before crossing the event horizon.

The black hole would immediately be pulled by gravity toward the center
of the earth. It would pick up matter as it fell. Unlike an object
falling in an evacuated tube it would not have enough momentum to rise
on the other side back to the surface of the earth. The matter picked
up on the way down would have less momentum on reaching the center.
Then as it rises up the other side it picks up more matter that
continues to slow the speed of the black hole before it reverses
direction at an even lesser distance from the center of the earth. The
result would be diminishing oscillations until it appears to be
stationary at the center.

While falling and on reaching the center I believe the theoretically
liquid core would fall into the black hole. However, the energy
released by falling into the black hole would create pressure that
limits the rate of matter entering the black hole. I have no idea how
fast or slow this would be. The earth might be stable like this for
many, many years as the earth's core falls into the black hole while
being repelled by the energy released. Or the entire earth might
collapse into the black hole as fast as it can fall.

--

Rick C

bitrex
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 7:30 am   



On 08/16/2016 01:04 AM, rickman wrote:
Quote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still enter
it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the universe by
orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated causing energy to
be emitted before crossing the event horizon.


A microscopic black hole, if such a thing could exist, would radiate
itself away via Hawking radiation before it had much of a chance to do
anything.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro_black_hole#Stability_of_a_micro_black_hole

bitrex
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 7:30 am   



On 08/16/2016 01:23 AM, bitrex wrote:
Quote:
On 08/16/2016 01:04 AM, rickman wrote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still enter
it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the universe by
orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated causing energy to
be emitted before crossing the event horizon.

A microscopic black hole, if such a thing could exist, would radiate
itself away via Hawking radiation before it had much of a chance to do
anything.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro_black_hole#Stability_of_a_micro_black_hole


Granted, we don't actually know if the laws of the universe are anything
like static and consistent over either long timescales, or at size
scales approaching the Planck length.

In fact, there are good reasons to argue that they aren't. You can
neatly solve a bunch of problems in cosmology and grand unification by
assuming that the universal constants and equations of relativity and
quantum mechanics only apply in constrained domains, not the whole universe.

John S
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 1:12 pm   



On 8/16/2016 12:04 AM, rickman wrote:
Quote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still enter
it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the universe by
orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated causing energy to
be emitted before crossing the event horizon.

The black hole would immediately be pulled by gravity toward the center
of the earth. It would pick up matter as it fell. Unlike an object
falling in an evacuated tube it would not have enough momentum to rise
on the other side back to the surface of the earth. The matter picked
up on the way down would have less momentum on reaching the center. Then
as it rises up the other side it picks up more matter that continues to
slow the speed of the black hole before it reverses direction at an even
lesser distance from the center of the earth. The result would be
diminishing oscillations until it appears to be stationary at the center.

While falling and on reaching the center I believe the theoretically
liquid core would fall into the black hole. However, the energy
released by falling into the black hole would create pressure that
limits the rate of matter entering the black hole. I have no idea how
fast or slow this would be. The earth might be stable like this for
many, many years as the earth's core falls into the black hole while
being repelled by the energy released. Or the entire earth might
collapse into the black hole as fast as it can fall.


What does the earth have to do with it?

David Brown
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 2:56 pm   



On 16/08/16 07:04, rickman wrote:
Quote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still enter
it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the universe by
orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated causing energy to
be emitted before crossing the event horizon.


The key point about a tiny black hole created by the LHC is that it
would be /tiny/. Really, really, /really/ tiny. So small that even
bacteria would need a bacteria microscope to see it, as one of my kids
used to say.

The collisions in the LHC are at 13 TeV. That's about 14 K atomic
masses - the weight of 1000 nitrogen atoms. So even assuming the entire
collision energy goes into making a black hole, it is not a very big
one. It is 2.3e-23 kg, with an event horizon radius of about 3.4e-50 m.
For comparison, a proton is about 0.9e-15 m in radius, and the Planck
length is 1.6 e-35 m.

So if and when a hydrogen nucleus, a proton, touches this black hole,
the acceleration due to gravity will be G.m/r, or 0.002 m/s. At room
temperature, atomic vibrations will be moving the proton in the region
of 10e-11 m at about 10e13 Hz, with RMS speeds of about 2200 m/s.

These numbers are all simplistic, because they are based on a "billiard
balls" model of the particles. But I think the numbers speak for
themselves - the black hole would be so tiny, with such a low mass, that
it would have totally negligible influence on anything around it. It
would simply pass through matter (the earth included) without affecting
it measurably, in the same way that neutrinos do, continuing in a path
determined by its initial direction and speed when it was created. If
it were at rest relative to the earth, then it would immediately fall to
the centre of the earth, pass through to the other side, and oscillate
almost endlessly. While it /could/ get lucky and see direct hits from
particles that gradually increase its mass, the universe would have
passed away in heat death long before the growing black hole could have
any noticeable effect on the earth.


Taking a bit more quantum mechanics and detailed physics into account,
the minimum mass for a black hole is about 22 g, or 1e31 eV. I'm sure
the CERN folks would love to increase their power by a factor of a
million million million, but I suspect budget considerations would rule
that out - the tunnel would have to be approximately the same
circumference as the Milky Way.

Also note that cosmic rays are hitting us continuously, many with
energies far above 14 TeV. The highest measured energy was about 20
million times as high as the LHC can make, and it did not result in a
world-destroying black hole.


Quote:
The black hole would immediately be pulled by gravity toward the center
of the earth. It would pick up matter as it fell. Unlike an object
falling in an evacuated tube it would not have enough momentum to rise
on the other side back to the surface of the earth. The matter picked
up on the way down would have less momentum on reaching the center. Then
as it rises up the other side it picks up more matter that continues to
slow the speed of the black hole before it reverses direction at an even
lesser distance from the center of the earth. The result would be
diminishing oscillations until it appears to be stationary at the center.

While falling and on reaching the center I believe the theoretically
liquid core would fall into the black hole. However, the energy
released by falling into the black hole would create pressure that
limits the rate of matter entering the black hole. I have no idea how
fast or slow this would be. The earth might be stable like this for
many, many years as the earth's core falls into the black hole while
being repelled by the energy released. Or the entire earth might
collapse into the black hole as fast as it can fall.


Kind of like this?

<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wVEhafuF7A>

Marvellous sci-fi, but not /exactly/ as it would happen in reality!

Tim Williams
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 4:10 pm   



There are a great many reasons why it won't happen, or be as graphic as
fiction would like to depict:

- The energy level is some 12 to 38 orders of magnitude too low.

- A uBH will decay extremely quickly. For any energy levels we can observe
right now (in the EeV range, including cosmic rays), the size and lifetime
of such a state will be below the Planck length and time, respectively. It
might as well not exist at all, because there's no meaningful way to express
something that fine (much as there's no meaningful way to say that radio
waves, of finite wavelength, might come from an instantaneous point source:
how can you even know?).

- A uBH will be extraordinarily luminous. Besides radiating away all its
mass-energy within a proportionally small time scale, the intensity of that
radiation is the highest possible in the universe. Accretion is limited by
radiation pressure:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddington_luminosity
For a uBH, presumably its intensity is so great that its accretion is
negative -- it literally costs energy to try and stuff more into it!

- A small BH isn't actually scary. If one were to fly through our solar
system, and happened to intersect the Earth, it would be travelling faster
than escape velocity, so it can't come to a rest unless it absorbs enough
reaction mass to balance out. It will tend to carry right on through!

But because it's small (and any infalling matter becomes very quickly heated
as it micro-accretes, and mind this is assuming the BH is cool enough to
accrete room-temperature matter by its own gravity, without blowing it away
by its radiation), it doesn't consume much if any, as it passes.

- A BH big enough to threaten the Earth, must be of planetary scale, so that
it can, say, be captured into orbit, using other planets or moons as
reaction mass. An orbit inside of the Moon would eventually decay (fairly
quickly?) due to the larger tidal forces. (Although, Earth's spin carries
quite a bit of energy too, which is why the Moon is actually gaining
altitude. Or, if this thing entered a retrograde orbit, the spin would make
things worse.)

A planetary-size BH will be fairly cool, and not terribly big. If Earth's
mass were crushed to "zero" size, it would have an event horizon of about
1.5cm diameter, and would be cosmically stable -- cooler than the cosmic
microwave background. It would have no problem (eventually) devouring
planets, though again, it will be rate limited, not instantaneous.

I want to say xkcd did a calculation of that, but I don't see it offhand.
Give it a search, maybe.

Tim

--
Seven Transistor Labs, LLC
Electrical Engineering Consultation and Contract Design
Website: http://seventransistorlabs.com

"rickman" <gnuarm_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
news:nou6ss$1qu$1_at_dont-email.me...
Quote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still enter
it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the universe by
orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated causing energy to be
emitted before crossing the event horizon.

The black hole would immediately be pulled by gravity toward the center of
the earth. It would pick up matter as it fell. Unlike an object falling
in an evacuated tube it would not have enough momentum to rise on the
other side back to the surface of the earth. The matter picked up on the
way down would have less momentum on reaching the center. Then as it rises
up the other side it picks up more matter that continues to slow the speed
of the black hole before it reverses direction at an even lesser distance
from the center of the earth. The result would be diminishing
oscillations until it appears to be stationary at the center.

While falling and on reaching the center I believe the theoretically
liquid core would fall into the black hole. However, the energy released
by falling into the black hole would create pressure that limits the rate
of matter entering the black hole. I have no idea how fast or slow this
would be. The earth might be stable like this for many, many years as the
earth's core falls into the black hole while being repelled by the energy
released. Or the entire earth might collapse into the black hole as fast
as it can fall.

--

Rick C


Cursitor Doom
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 6:16 pm   



On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 01:04:28 -0400, rickman wrote:

Quote:
While falling and on reaching the center I believe the theoretically
liquid core would fall into the black hole. However, the energy
released by falling into the black hole would create pressure that
limits the rate of matter entering the black hole. I have no idea how
fast or slow this would be. The earth might be stable like this for
many, many years as the earth's core falls into the black hole while
being repelled by the energy released. Or the entire earth might
collapse into the black hole as fast as it can fall.


It's called a "strangelet" by those who've already considered this
possibility and if your analysis of the damped oscillation is correct,
then it's hard to see how we wouldn't be instantly (or more or less
instantly) destroyed. Fortunately the experts reckon they can create
strangelets with no adverse consequences. Smile

George Herold
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 6:30 pm   



On Tuesday, August 16, 2016 at 12:20:24 PM UTC-4, Tim Wescott wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 01:23:34 -0400, bitrex wrote:

On 08/16/2016 01:04 AM, rickman wrote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still
enter it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the
universe by orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated
causing energy to be emitted before crossing the event horizon.

A microscopic black hole, if such a thing could exist, would radiate
itself away via Hawking radiation before it had much of a chance to do
anything.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Micro_black_hole#Stability_of_a_micro_black_hole

If such a thing as Hawking radiation exists.

IIRC Hawking radiation mostly follows from thermo-dynamics.
It's like black body radiation... Black holes have some temperature.
(Finding the temperature of a black hole is the hard part... :^)

George H.
Quote:

There's still a lot we don't know about the border of relativity and
quantum mechanics, and it's on that border where Hawking radiation is
described. Most physicists _think_ that black holes evaporate, but no
one's observed it, and if our existing models are true then there ought
to be small black holes left over from the Big Bang, evaporating away
with an obvious radiation signature -- but we have seen no such signature.

--
Tim Wescott
Control systems, embedded software and circuit design
I'm looking for work! See my website if you're interested
http://www.wescottdesign.com


George Herold
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 7:42 pm   



On Tuesday, August 16, 2016 at 12:47:18 PM UTC-4, rickman wrote:
Quote:
On 8/16/2016 12:30 PM, George Herold wrote:
On Tuesday, August 16, 2016 at 12:20:24 PM UTC-4, Tim Wescott wrote:
On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 01:23:34 -0400, bitrex wrote:

On 08/16/2016 01:04 AM, rickman wrote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still
enter it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the
universe by orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated
causing energy to be emitted before crossing the event horizon.

A microscopic black hole, if such a thing could exist, would radiate
itself away via Hawking radiation before it had much of a chance to do
anything.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Micro_black_hole#Stability_of_a_micro_black_hole

If such a thing as Hawking radiation exists.
IIRC Hawking radiation mostly follows from thermo-dynamics.
It's like black body radiation... Black holes have some temperature.
(Finding the temperature of a black hole is the hard part... :^)

I'm not sure that is a valid way to look at it. Everything that makes
up a black hole is on the other side of the event horizon. It may well
have a temperature, but we'll never feel any effect from it as nothing
can cross back through the event horizon. In a sense, the event horizon
of a black hole is an infinite heat sink at 0 °K. There may be
radiation from the space around the black hole, but nothing from the
black hole itself.

--

Rick C


Ahh, Rick I understand you are a smart guy. There are plenty of other smart guys
out there. I think the best (clearest) explanation I've seen/ read
(and it's been a while) was in a set of video lectures by Leonard Susskind.
Googling he's got a bunch... I don't recall which ones. Advanced stat. mech.
or maybe QM.

Black holes have a temperature. That's pretty cool. (NPI)
Here's wiki...(I only looked at the first few paragraphs.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation

George H.

George Herold
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 9:45 pm   



On Tuesday, August 16, 2016 at 2:37:39 PM UTC-4, Tim Wescott wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 09:30:13 -0700, George Herold wrote:

On Tuesday, August 16, 2016 at 12:20:24 PM UTC-4, Tim Wescott wrote:
On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 01:23:34 -0400, bitrex wrote:

On 08/16/2016 01:04 AM, rickman wrote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still
enter it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the
universe by orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated
causing energy to be emitted before crossing the event horizon.

A microscopic black hole, if such a thing could exist, would radiate
itself away via Hawking radiation before it had much of a chance to
do anything.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Micro_black_hole#Stability_of_a_micro_black_hole

If such a thing as Hawking radiation exists.
IIRC Hawking radiation mostly follows from thermo-dynamics.
It's like black body radiation... Black holes have some temperature.
(Finding the temperature of a black hole is the hard part... :^)

Read Hawking's "A Brief History of Time". Computing Hawking radiation
from the amount of curvature of space and computing it from the ratio of
entropy to total surface area gives the same answers. At the time this
was a fall-on-the-floor astonishing result, and one that gave a lot of
credence to the result.

I never read that book.
I think this is the susskind video I watched,
https://cosmolearning.org/video-lectures/black-hole-thermodynamics/

Black holes don't start till ~55 minutes.
(The beginning is all good stat. mech. stuff...)

It might be a similar argument.

George H.


Quote:
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
http://www.wescottdesign.com

I'm looking for work -- see my website!


Tim Wescott
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 10:20 pm   



On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 01:23:34 -0400, bitrex wrote:

Quote:
On 08/16/2016 01:04 AM, rickman wrote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still
enter it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the
universe by orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated
causing energy to be emitted before crossing the event horizon.

A microscopic black hole, if such a thing could exist, would radiate
itself away via Hawking radiation before it had much of a chance to do
anything.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Micro_black_hole#Stability_of_a_micro_black_hole


If such a thing as Hawking radiation exists.

There's still a lot we don't know about the border of relativity and
quantum mechanics, and it's on that border where Hawking radiation is
described. Most physicists _think_ that black holes evaporate, but no
one's observed it, and if our existing models are true then there ought
to be small black holes left over from the Big Bang, evaporating away
with an obvious radiation signature -- but we have seen no such signature.

--
Tim Wescott
Control systems, embedded software and circuit design
I'm looking for work! See my website if you're interested
http://www.wescottdesign.com

Tim Wescott
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 10:23 pm   



On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 01:04:28 -0400, rickman wrote:

Quote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still enter
it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the universe by
orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated causing energy to
be emitted before crossing the event horizon.

The black hole would immediately be pulled by gravity toward the center
of the earth. It would pick up matter as it fell. Unlike an object
falling in an evacuated tube it would not have enough momentum to rise
on the other side back to the surface of the earth. The matter picked
up on the way down would have less momentum on reaching the center. Then
as it rises up the other side it picks up more matter that continues to
slow the speed of the black hole before it reverses direction at an even
lesser distance from the center of the earth. The result would be
diminishing oscillations until it appears to be stationary at the
center.

While falling and on reaching the center I believe the theoretically
liquid core would fall into the black hole. However, the energy
released by falling into the black hole would create pressure that
limits the rate of matter entering the black hole. I have no idea how
fast or slow this would be. The earth might be stable like this for
many, many years as the earth's core falls into the black hole while
being repelled by the energy released. Or the entire earth might
collapse into the black hole as fast as it can fall.


The whole "black holes in the LHC" thing came about because _if_ string
theory is correct, and _if_ some of the rolled-up dimensions are big
enough, then a black hole can form at LHC energies, and be detectable.
Such a black hole would decay rapidly, due to Hawking radiation.

If the standard model applies, then see David Brown's discussion.

There were no black hole events seen at the LHC, which puts an upper
limit on the size of any rolled-up dimensions in any higher-order models
of particle physics (like string theory).

--
Tim Wescott
Control systems, embedded software and circuit design
I'm looking for work! See my website if you're interested
http://www.wescottdesign.com

George Herold
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 10:36 pm   



On Tuesday, August 16, 2016 at 2:39:27 PM UTC-4, Tim Wescott wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 12:50:57 -0400, bitrex wrote:

On 08/16/2016 12:20 PM, Tim Wescott wrote:
On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 01:23:34 -0400, bitrex wrote:

On 08/16/2016 01:04 AM, rickman wrote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still
enter it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the
universe by orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated
causing energy to be emitted before crossing the event horizon.

A microscopic black hole, if such a thing could exist, would radiate
itself away via Hawking radiation before it had much of a chance to do
anything.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Micro_black_hole#Stability_of_a_micro_black_hole

If such a thing as Hawking radiation exists.

It kind of has to, or else what we think we know about quantum field
theory must be pretty much wrong

The main question is not whether Hawking radiation exists, but what
happens to the information.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_hole_information_paradox

Well, true, and it probably does, but it hasn't been observed yet.

Quantum field theory doesn't predict either dark energy or dark matter,
yet astronomical measurements say they must exist. So quantum field
theory is kind of behind the 8-ball right now on explaining how the
universe works.


Hmm.. Tim, this may not be correct, but I think QM field theory does predict
dark energy. ... it just gets it wrong by 60 orders of magnitude.. or some number
like that.... it's like the zero point motion of virtual particle in the vacuum.
(see link below)
Dark matter (presumably) is just some particle(s) that you have to add to the theory... QM theory doesn't predict the electron for instance.

I was reading this at home...
https://www.quantamagazine.org/20160705-feynman-diagrams-nature-of-empty-space/

George H.
Quote:

--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
http://www.wescottdesign.com

I'm looking for work -- see my website!


rickman
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 10:47 pm   



On 8/16/2016 12:30 PM, George Herold wrote:
Quote:
On Tuesday, August 16, 2016 at 12:20:24 PM UTC-4, Tim Wescott wrote:
On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 01:23:34 -0400, bitrex wrote:

On 08/16/2016 01:04 AM, rickman wrote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still
enter it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the
universe by orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated
causing energy to be emitted before crossing the event horizon.

A microscopic black hole, if such a thing could exist, would radiate
itself away via Hawking radiation before it had much of a chance to do
anything.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Micro_black_hole#Stability_of_a_micro_black_hole

If such a thing as Hawking radiation exists.
IIRC Hawking radiation mostly follows from thermo-dynamics.
It's like black body radiation... Black holes have some temperature.
(Finding the temperature of a black hole is the hard part... :^)


I'm not sure that is a valid way to look at it. Everything that makes
up a black hole is on the other side of the event horizon. It may well
have a temperature, but we'll never feel any effect from it as nothing
can cross back through the event horizon. In a sense, the event horizon
of a black hole is an infinite heat sink at 0 °K. There may be
radiation from the space around the black hole, but nothing from the
black hole itself.

--

Rick C

bitrex
Guest

Tue Aug 16, 2016 10:50 pm   



On 08/16/2016 12:20 PM, Tim Wescott wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 01:23:34 -0400, bitrex wrote:

On 08/16/2016 01:04 AM, rickman wrote:
I was explaining black holes to a friend who asked about the LHC and
thought about what might happen if a tiny black hole were created.

I believe matter falling into a microscopic black hole would still
enter it in a similar manner to large black holes elsewhere in the
universe by orbiting the tiny black hole while being accelerated
causing energy to be emitted before crossing the event horizon.

A microscopic black hole, if such a thing could exist, would radiate
itself away via Hawking radiation before it had much of a chance to do
anything.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Micro_black_hole#Stability_of_a_micro_black_hole

If such a thing as Hawking radiation exists.


It kind of has to, or else what we think we know about quantum field
theory must be pretty much wrong

The main question is not whether Hawking radiation exists, but what
happens to the information.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_hole_information_paradox

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