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Lead acid battery charger (or alternator) switching to trick

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Steve Walker
Guest

Fri Jul 12, 2019 8:45 pm   



On 12/07/2019 14:37, TMS320 wrote:
Quote:
On 12/07/2019 07:56, Daniel60 wrote:
Daniel60 wrote on 11/07/2019 7:09 PM:

Do Electric Cars have a 'standard' operating voltage?? Or does it
vary from one manufacturer to another??

Ah!! Good to read there is consistency ...... *NOT* !! ;-P
 More volts requires more cells. Better to standardise on the size of a
cell, set a maximum operating current and alter the number of cells
according to cost/power requirements.


Better still, standardised voltage and standardised packs where a small
town car may use one, while a larger, longer range car may use two or
three. Make the packs so they can be slid in or out - it doesn't matter
if each car puts them in at different locations, in different directions
or around different obstructions - and "battery stations" could use
robot arms, pre-programmed for all different models, to swap out
discharged batteries for fully charged ones. The service paid for at a
fixed sum, plus a rate for the increase in charge level.

That makes recharging an electric vehicle as fast as a petrol or diesel
one from the driver's point of view and ensures that failing batteries
are removed from circulation, with the cost spread amongst all drivers
rather than an individual being hit by a high fee.

It would also mean that as battery technology improved, all cars would
benefit, not just the latest model.

SteveW

Dave Plowman (News)
Guest

Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:45 am   



In article <qgalu9$j6e$1_at_dont-email.me>,
Steve Walker <steve_at_walker-family.me.uk> wrote:
Quote:
Better still, standardised voltage and standardised packs where a small
town car may use one, while a larger, longer range car may use two or
three. Make the packs so they can be slid in or out - it doesn't matter
if each car puts them in at different locations, in different directions
or around different obstructions - and "battery stations" could use
robot arms, pre-programmed for all different models, to swap out
discharged batteries for fully charged ones. The service paid for at a
fixed sum, plus a rate for the increase in charge level.

That makes recharging an electric vehicle as fast as a petrol or diesel
one from the driver's point of view and ensures that failing batteries
are removed from circulation, with the cost spread amongst all drivers
rather than an individual being hit by a high fee.

It would also mean that as battery technology improved, all cars would
benefit, not just the latest model.


Which would require cooperation between every maker in every country.
Just the thing all the Farages and Trumps of this world are dead against.
How dare anyone tell us how we should do things. And so on.

--
*If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything.*

Dave Plowman dave_at_davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.

Robin
Guest

Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:45 pm   



On 13/07/2019 11:15, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
Quote:
In article <qgalu9$j6e$1_at_dont-email.me>,
Steve Walker <steve_at_walker-family.me.uk> wrote:
Better still, standardised voltage and standardised packs where a small
town car may use one, while a larger, longer range car may use two or
three. Make the packs so they can be slid in or out - it doesn't matter
if each car puts them in at different locations, in different directions
or around different obstructions - and "battery stations" could use
robot arms, pre-programmed for all different models, to swap out
discharged batteries for fully charged ones. The service paid for at a
fixed sum, plus a rate for the increase in charge level.

That makes recharging an electric vehicle as fast as a petrol or diesel
one from the driver's point of view and ensures that failing batteries
are removed from circulation, with the cost spread amongst all drivers
rather than an individual being hit by a high fee.

It would also mean that as battery technology improved, all cars would
benefit, not just the latest model.

Which would require cooperation between every maker in every country.
Just the thing all the Farages and Trumps of this world are dead against.
How dare anyone tell us how we should do things. And so on.


How do you propose decisions should be made on what is to be produced
and when innovation is to be allowed? The same system that produced the
Trabant in 1957 - and carried on producing it until 1990?

--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid

Steve Walker
Guest

Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:45 pm   



On 13/07/2019 11:15, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
Quote:
In article <qgalu9$j6e$1_at_dont-email.me>,
Steve Walker <steve_at_walker-family.me.uk> wrote:
Better still, standardised voltage and standardised packs where a small
town car may use one, while a larger, longer range car may use two or
three. Make the packs so they can be slid in or out - it doesn't matter
if each car puts them in at different locations, in different directions
or around different obstructions - and "battery stations" could use
robot arms, pre-programmed for all different models, to swap out
discharged batteries for fully charged ones. The service paid for at a
fixed sum, plus a rate for the increase in charge level.

That makes recharging an electric vehicle as fast as a petrol or diesel
one from the driver's point of view and ensures that failing batteries
are removed from circulation, with the cost spread amongst all drivers
rather than an individual being hit by a high fee.

It would also mean that as battery technology improved, all cars would
benefit, not just the latest model.

Which would require cooperation between every maker in every country.
Just the thing all the Farages and Trumps of this world are dead against.
How dare anyone tell us how we should do things. And so on.


We manage to agree on the standards of petrol that cars have to be able
to run on now. We manage to impose (although not police) emissions
standards. Standards are not the same in every country, but someone
supplying from outside has to meet the standards in force in the UK.
There is nothing wrong with countries co-operating on standards - only
in having them imposed externally.

SteveW

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